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Cardio for Improving Working Set Cardio?

what do you find improves your working set cardio the most? HIIT or low intensity cardio?

my cardio is horrible for squatting/deadlifting and it is starting to hold me back (heart rate gets too high before muscles fatigue)

i would think HIIT would improve cardio the most for lifting, since its brief (1-2 minutes) of elevated heart rate similar to lifting, so I started doing interval training (60 minutes, 2 high(180-190 heart rate) 2 low) on some off days, is this a good way?

Get stronger to add reps.

You are that out of shape that you can’t complete your sets because you are out of breath and your heart rate is elevated?

Your heart rate is going to be going through the roof with high intensity training, you are going all out.

I’m really not understanding this post.

It sounds to me that you either need to start doing regular cardio because you are out of shape, get stronger so you can do more reps, or just man up.

How many reps are we talking?

How do you measure your heart rate in the middle of squatting?

[quote]fr0gger666 wrote:
what do you find improves your working set cardio the most? HIIT or low intensity cardio?

my cardio is horrible for squatting/deadlifting and it is starting to hold me back (heart rate gets too high before muscles fatigue)

i would think HIIT would improve cardio the most for lifting, since its brief (1-2 minutes) of elevated heart rate similar to lifting, so I started doing interval training (60 minutes, 2 high(180-190 heart rate) 2 low) on some off days, is this a good way?

[/quote]

The only time I really had this problem was when I was really fat.

The Principle of Specificity

The Specificity Principle simply states that exercising a certain body part or component of the body primarily develops that part. The Principle of Specificity implies that, to become better at a particular exercise or skill, you must perform that exercise or skill. A runner should train by running, a swimmer by swimming and a cyclist by cycling. While it’s helpful to have a good base of fitness and to do general conditioning routines, if you want to be better at your sport, you need to train specifically for that sport.

If you want to improve your high rep squat and deadlift; do more high rep squat and deadlift.

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
If you want to improve your high rep squat and deadlift; do more high rep squat and deadlift. [/quote]

This.

However, in my experience the evil steady state cardio will significantly improve your recovery time pretty between sets.

Bro you need to do some normal cardio. Unlike most of these people I understand what you’re saying. If I was you I would jump rope. It’s gonna be hard as fuck for the first week or two but eventually you’ll be able to go for a while without completely getting winded, and at that point you’ll be able to finish your squats without getting winded.

[quote]Aopocetx wrote:
Bro you need to do some normal cardio. Unlike most of these people I understand what you’re saying. If I was you I would jump rope. It’s gonna be hard as fuck for the first week or two but eventually you’ll be able to go for a while without completely getting winded, and at that point you’ll be able to finish your squats without getting winded.[/quote]

Adding normal cardio alone never helped me as much as simply doing more reps with less rest especially when I do more of a cycle through exercises like I did in Colorado.

Cardio is good for some and evil for others. It causes me to lose muscle. It took me years to learn how to train to get the same effect without muscle loss.

Training twice a day (ding lighter weight in the morning with less rest) worked the best.

It all comes down to personal experience.

Steady state cardio trains your aerobic glycolitic metabolic pathway. If you get winded doing long sets of squats or deadlifts, you want to train your anaerobic glycolitic pathway, which means you would benefit most from doing HIIT, or just including more higher rep squats and deads in your training.

That’s a good suggestion Prof X, less rest in between sets. I still think some hard cardio (jump rope or sprinting) for a short time every couple days (so as to not burn too many calories) would potentially help him considering his heart is VERY weak in pumping oxygen.

[quote]aeyogi wrote:
Steady state cardio trains your aerobic glycolitic metabolic pathway. If you get winded doing long sets of squats or deadlifts, you want to train your anaerobic glycolitic pathway, which means you would benefit most from doing HIIT, or just including more higher rep squats and deads in your training.[/quote]

This.

Steady state cardio is for fat people who want to stay fat and really serious lifters who don’;t mind losing some muscle to stay lean.

That is honestly how I feel about it now.

I would rather make changes to my diet alone first than start steady state cardio.

[quote]Aopocetx wrote:
That’s a good suggestion Prof X, less rest in between sets. I still think some hard cardio (jump rope or sprinting) for a short time every couple days (so as to not burn too many calories) would potentially help him considering his heart is VERY weak in pumping oxygen.[/quote]

True, nothing wrong with jumping rope…but guys who have limited time already put all of that extra “time” into their usual training.

I personally wouldn’t add something if I can just increase what I am already doing that I know works.

I on the other hand, look and feel better when doing regular cardio both LISS and HIIT.

And this is in regard to whether I am adding size, or shredding up.

So everyone is different.

Wait, I thought getting winded when doing high rep squats and deads were normal?

How high reps are we talking here?

[quote]whatever2k wrote:
Wait, I thought getting winded when doing high rep squats and deads were normal?

How high reps are we talking here?[/quote]

I’m with this guy too. I am feeling it big time after a set of squats even low rep. I feel my pulse beating through my head and body for a few seconds after the lift.

You’re getting close to your max heart rate with activities like these.

If you do legs and don’t get winded, you didn’t do legs.

[quote]austin_bicep wrote:

[quote]whatever2k wrote:
Wait, I thought getting winded when doing high rep squats and deads were normal?

How high reps are we talking here?[/quote]

I’m with this guy too. I am feeling it big time after a set of squats even low rep. I feel my pulse beating through my head and body for a few seconds after the lift.

You’re getting close to your max heart rate with activities like these.[/quote]

Exactly! I dont think it matters how good shape you are in. A 30 rep set of squats with a challenging weight is gonna gas anyone the fuck out.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
If you do legs and don’t get winded, you didn’t do legs.[/quote]

Second that, and it was the case with me both when I did no cardio and now when I do a good amount of cardio. Difference is that I am now able to recover faster inbetween sets and hence do more volume in less time.

If your that out of shape first, see if it’s your upper body too. If you do 20 reps upper body and heart gets tired before your muscles then you should do high rep training all around. Otherwise, you can just stick with lower body.

The second most important part is frequency. Which is why people benefit from cardio. Usually when they want to improve it they do it 3 - 5x a week. If you only do squats on leg day it’s not going to help your heart much. So HIIT you can less frequently to improve, steady state you will need at least 3x a week, which is the same with just adding more reps.

I say all this to say you can simply add 5 minutes of light weight squats before every workout for a few weeks and your cardio should go right up.