T Nation

Carbs, Fiber, and 'Active' Carbs

Hi little buddies,

So today I was eating this protein bar, and on the back the label is telling me there is 22 grams of carbs, however 18 grams of that is dietary fiber, leaving only 4 “active” carbs.

I just want to check with you guys if this is all correct and that when I count my macros I should only count the “active carbs”. Is there chance that any of those 18 grams of dietary fiber could be digested and turned into “active” carbs??

tweet

Not all nutrition labels are accurate, but generally speaking they should be. As for fiber, there is soluble and insoluble, where one passes through undigested, and the other gets digested by gut bacteria. But in either case, neither will become “active” as you called it.

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Not all nutrition labels are accurate, but generally speaking they should be. As for fiber, there is soluble and insoluble, where one passes through undigested, and the other gets digested by gut bacteria. But in either case, neither will become “active” as you called it. [/quote]
Both get fermented by gut bacteria.

But as Ecchastang said, you should not count any type of fiber as “active carbs”

Thanks friends.

At the moment I am a bit skeptic about a particular protein bar on the market that really promotes the fact that the majority of carbs are “un-active carbs”, making the bar a “real low carb” bar. Hence Im doing my research.

tweet

Just for maximum clarification, the fiber can yield up to 1 calorie per gram when fermented in the gut, however it delivers this in the form of fat: Butyrate. So if you get 25 grams of carbs you might get 25 calories, but its non-insulogenic. It may even buffer insulin and as well the soluble fiber probably prevents the absorption of as many calories as it provides by binding to fatty acids and carrying them out of the colon.

There is a theory around that the butyrate produced from fiber fermentation is THE reason why soluble fiber is beneficial to health. Butyrate is the main nutrient that feeds and protects the cells lining the colon.