T Nation

Can't Deadlift Without Back Rounding


#1

I've tried studying the form many times, I've looked at tutorials online, including Eric Cressey's, but I cannot appropiate my form to where I can deadlift without rounding my back. I have long legs, so it takes more for me to bring the weight down. What can I do to fix this?


#2

work on your lats and core and mobility. Also practice light to get form down.


#3

Try a lighter weight. Or elevate the bar so you’re not starting from the floor.


#4

Pop your chest… This worked for one of the metrosexuals in my gym. And no, its not a joke. He really did got his form down when I told him to pop his chest.


#5

if you dont brace your abs, you won’t be able to keep form. So either brace your abs, get em stronger, or wear a belt.


#6

i suggest you lay off the heavy weights for now

throw in some supermans and back extensions for 2 weeks


#7

Stretch, get some flexibility in your back.
Raise the bar level definitely.


#8

[quote]bluefingas wrote:
Stretch, get some flexibility in your back.
Raise the bar level definitely.[/quote]

Flexibility in the back is not a requirement to do any compound exercise.

Most people have hamstrings too tight to hit the beginning of a deadlift or the bottom of a squat. Fewer people have glute tightness, which is usually accompanied by relatively flexible hamstrings. Most people also have some issues with certain hip flexors.

Without improving your flexibility in these exercises, deadlifting is absolutely impossible. If you arent going to stretch stop lifting right now and never do it again. You will eventually fuck up your knees and back almost guaranteed. There is no way around this, just do it. Static and dynamic stretch every day. Foam roll will also help.

Once you have the flexibility you will be able to hit the positions you want, but you still need to take it slow, because after flexibility, strength of the back is the next limiting factor. At first it will be hard for you to maintain a good stiff back, but if you take it slow it will get stronger very fast.


#9

OR there is another possibility. You are using too heavy a weight.


#10

do good mornings and 45 deg. extensions. get that lower back strong


#11

3 questions

How tall are you?
Are your hips getting too low, thus turning it almost into a squat?
Have you tried initiating the pull with your hips higher up (think just a little lower than a Romanian Dead)?


#12

[quote]Gambling wrote:
I’ve tried studying the form many times, I’ve looked at tutorials online, including Eric Cressey’s, but I cannot appropiate my form to where I can deadlift without rounding my back. I have long legs, so it takes more for me to bring the weight down. What can I do to fix this?[/quote]

Some of the best deadlifting advise I’ve come across is the Mark Rippitoe Starting Strength Lectures. The book is also well worth tracking down and you’ll find a host of videos on you-tube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX8jgCFXYTU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht363HslwnM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vue17RjRhwM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu3-64C7JEY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syt7A23YnpA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP4FwBkuK6o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ocCK4BSIMI


#13

[quote]RiVaL6 wrote:
i suggest you lay off the heavy weights for now

throw in some supermans and back extensions for 2 weeks[/quote]

“Supermans” super-suck.


#14

OP, how much weight are you trying to pull? Are you just weak as shit all over? Not trying to offend -much- but need to know. IME, a lot of beginners just have such poor general body strength they need tons of remedial work to be able to do the big movements.

Try raising the height up on a rack until you can pull without rounding. Then increase weight and slowly bring the height back down to the floor.

Stuff like back raises for time, planks, pushups and (in a perfect world) safety bar box squat will help too. Particularly if you test your isometric back raise and plank and you can’t hold it for 60 seconds, work on that.


#15

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
bluefingas wrote:
Stretch, get some flexibility in your back.
Raise the bar level definitely.

Flexibility in the back is not a requirement to do any compound exercise.

Most people have hamstrings too tight to hit the beginning of a deadlift or the bottom of a squat. Fewer people have glute tightness, which is usually accompanied by relatively flexible hamstrings. Most people also have some issues with certain hip flexors.

Without improving your flexibility in these exercises, deadlifting is absolutely impossible. If you arent going to stretch stop lifting right now and never do it again. You will eventually fuck up your knees and back almost guaranteed. There is no way around this, just do it. Static and dynamic stretch every day. Foam roll will also help.

Once you have the flexibility you will be able to hit the positions you want, but you still need to take it slow, because after flexibility, strength of the back is the next limiting factor. At first it will be hard for you to maintain a good stiff back, but if you take it slow it will get stronger very fast.

[/quote]

I second this. Sounds like a flexibilty issue to me.


#16

Get a broomstick or dowel rod and put it behind you and make sure it has three contact points: the back of your head, your upper back and your tailbone, now practice bending over without the stick losing contact with any of those points. Do it next to a mirror and you will be able to see where your problem is and then you’ll be able to adjust how your bending over. This usually really helps in developing the proper “hip hinge” and will help you keep your lumbar spine neutral. Hope that helps

-Darian


#17

[quote]DrThrash wrote:
Gambling wrote:
I’ve tried studying the form many times, I’ve looked at tutorials online, including Eric Cressey’s, but I cannot appropiate my form to where I can deadlift without rounding my back. I have long legs, so it takes more for me to bring the weight down. What can I do to fix this?

Some of the best deadlifting advise I’ve come across is the Mark Rippitoe Starting Strength Lectures. The book is also well worth tracking down and you’ll find a host of videos on you-tube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX8jgCFXYTU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht363HslwnM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vue17RjRhwM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu3-64C7JEY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syt7A23YnpA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP4FwBkuK6o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ocCK4BSIMI

[/quote]

Best first post ever.

OP, stretch your hamstrings daily and watch those. Now. If you can’t fix your deadlift from watching them and having someone give you lifting cues then you’ll need to get a coach.


#18

[quote]The other Rob wrote:
If you can’t fix your deadlift from watching them and having someone give you lifting cues then you’ll need to get a coach.[/quote]

That’s the thing. If he “knows” what to do and “can’t” fix it, then he needs to do something else. Just trying harder won’t help. (Not that that’s what you’re telling him to do.)


#19

[quote]The other Rob wrote:
DrThrash wrote:
Gambling wrote:
I’ve tried studying the form many times, I’ve looked at tutorials online, including Eric Cressey’s, but I cannot appropiate my form to where I can deadlift without rounding my back. I have long legs, so it takes more for me to bring the weight down. What can I do to fix this?

Some of the best deadlifting advise I’ve come across is the Mark Rippitoe Starting Strength Lectures. The book is also well worth tracking down and you’ll find a host of videos on you-tube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX8jgCFXYTU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht363HslwnM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vue17RjRhwM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu3-64C7JEY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syt7A23YnpA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP4FwBkuK6o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ocCK4BSIMI

Best first post ever.[/quote]

Cheers dude :wink:


#20

[quote]conorh wrote:
The other Rob wrote:
If you can’t fix your deadlift from watching them and having someone give you lifting cues then you’ll need to get a coach.

That’s the thing. If he “knows” what to do and “can’t” fix it, then he needs to do something else. Just trying harder won’t help. (Not that that’s what you’re telling him to do.)[/quote]

If the videos don’t help then your earlier post pretty much covers everything he should be doing. Just saying Rip really knows his stuff and pretty much specialises in getting rank beginners lifting properly. Most people can benefit from watching his videos, even those who think they know what they are doing.