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Can't Deadlift 405 for a Single

I can do 385 x 4 but can’t hit 405 for a single. I’ll get it maybe 2 inches off the floor then nothing.

Is this because I’m slow twitch dominant?

Anyone have the same problem? How’d you remedy it?

Thanks for any help.

What about doing heavy rack lockouts to get used to the weight. Then slowly lower the pins over a couple weeks until your close to the ground.

Maybe focus on some higher rep romanian deadlifts/stiff (10 rep area) legged deadlifts (Matt kroc does this sometimes). Alongside his heavy ass DB rows. Matt says these kind of things help his deadlift strength. Learn from the best lol.

Some heavy reps on leg curls/seated/standing also just to help add size on them(6-8 reps).

I imagine doing some work and getting stronger on some similar movements and then coming back to it you should come back alot stronger.

edit: forgot about deficit pulls to. those could help pulling off the floor

deficit deads and squats are good for power off the floor. Whenever I focus more on my squat, my deadlift goes up.

You have this posted in the wrong section.

[quote]BlackLabel wrote:
You have this posted in the wrong section.[/quote]

My sincerest apologies.

As a guess you are experiencing Golgi tendon organ inhibition.

What this is, is that there are “stretch sensors,” so to speak, that work to protect the tendons via sending a signal inhibitory to muscle contraction upon the tendon stretching what is deemed to be too much.

Ordinarily it is not the case that the tendon really cannot tolerate anything more: it’s just that the Golgi tendon organs limiting the process have not become habituated to the forces involved.

So at 385 you’re staying under their limit: at 405 you are past, though the muscles are almost surely strong enough.

The inhibition can be trained out.

[quote]Carlitosway wrote:
What about doing heavy rack lockouts to get used to the weight. Then slowly lower the pins over a couple weeks until your close to the ground.

Maybe focus on some higher rep romanian deadlifts/stiff (10-12) legged deadlifts (Matt kroc does this sometimes). Alongside his heavy ass DB rows. Matt says these kind of things help his deadlift strength. Learn from the best lol.

Some heavy reps on leg curls/seated/standing also(6-8 reps).

I imagine doing some work on some similar movements and then coming back to it you should come back alot stronger.
[/quote]

I switch between deads and rack pulls from week to week. I like the stiff legged-deadlift idea though.

My lame gym’s DBs only go up to 110.

Thanks.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
As a guess you are experiencing Golgi tendon organ inhibition.

What this is, is that there are “stretch sensors,” so to speak, that work to protect the tendons via sending a signal inhibitory to muscle contraction upon the tendon stretching what is deemed to be too much.

Ordinarily it is not the case that the tendon really cannot tolerate anything more: it’s just that the Golgi tendon organs limiting the process have not become habituated to the forces involved.

So at 385 you’re staying under their limit: at 405 you are past, though the muscles are almost surely strong enough.

The inhibition can be trained out.
[/quote]

Ah hah!

I figured it was something like that, because if I don’t start from the floor, I can get 405 a couple of times.

Thanks Bill.

[quote]thephantom wrote:
deficit deads and squats are good for power off the floor. Whenever I focus more on my squat, my deadlift goes up. [/quote]

Okay. I think I’ll start incorporating deficit deads and deficit stiff leg deads.

Thanks for the help.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
As a guess you are experiencing Golgi tendon organ inhibition.

What this is, is that there are “stretch sensors,” so to speak, that work to protect the tendons via sending a signal inhibitory to muscle contraction upon the tendon stretching what is deemed to be too much.

Ordinarily it is not the case that the tendon really cannot tolerate anything more: it’s just that the Golgi tendon organs limiting the process have not become habituated to the forces involved.

So at 385 you’re staying under their limit: at 405 you are past, though the muscles are almost surely strong enough.

The inhibition can be trained out.
[/quote]

as saliva dribbles Gosh darnit Billy?! Ya sur R smrt rite thurr fella.:smiley:

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
As a guess you are experiencing Golgi tendon organ inhibition.

What this is, is that there are “stretch sensors,” so to speak, that work to protect the tendons via sending a signal inhibitory to muscle contraction upon the tendon stretching what is deemed to be too much.

Ordinarily it is not the case that the tendon really cannot tolerate anything more: it’s just that the Golgi tendon organs limiting the process have not become habituated to the forces involved.

So at 385 you’re staying under their limit: at 405 you are past, though the muscles are almost surely strong enough.

The inhibition can be trained out.
[/quote]

That’s excellent! I have the same trouble as the OP; can do triples but even if I up the weight slightly, just can’t get the pull. Will the rack lockouts help? I’m also doing heavy static holds in the cage.

Whoa nelly! Make sure form is textbook, please for your sake. Its lame to barely rep out 315 on the squat for 6 when a few months ago it was a breeze. What helped me push past sticking points, were rack pulls. I rarely pull from the floor now though but when I did it helped crack that 405 mark. Cheers.

-GB

Yes, rack pulls may well help.

You also might find that – reverse of deficit deadlifts – having the bar even only slightly higher may allow you to handle the 405. You might try first seeing if simply ditching the shoes and going barefoot (or in socks) does it for you. Many would be surprised at how much lift even most sneakers have. If not sufficient, while it’s a moderate pain, the barbell can also be set up on top of up to three plates lying flat per side (maybe more but that is the most I’ve used for any purpose.) On becoming able to lift the heavier weight, then reduce the added height.

Separate from height methods:

It can also help to become more accustomed to a weight very close to the maximum you can handle, or presently about this 385 lb. Since you can do it for four reps it should be no overly taxing for you to do say 10 sets of 2.

You can also use half deadlifts going only to just under the knees, but use a significantly lighter weight allowing you to rip the bar off the floor (make sure you are well set and already tensed before doing so as there is no need to generate shock load.) You can let off the pull before the bar reaches the knees and let it pretty much coast to the just-under-knees point. Though the weight is lighter, the acceleration means the actual force generated can be easily your 385. Becoming used to quick forceful movements can allow you to handle slower forceful movements, as when loaded to for example the 405.

pull 385 x 6

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
pull 385 x 6
[/quote]

x2. I was going to mention this. Get your reps up higher with 385 and 405 will come.

Second going barefoot. Easy 5-10 lbs right there.

Warmup progression makes a big difference too. You definitely don’t want to be going to failure before 405, but you also need to get used to weights close to it.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Yes, rack pulls may well help.

You also might find that – reverse of deficit deadlifts – having the bar even only slightly higher may allow you to handle the 405. You might try first seeing if simply ditching the shoes and going barefoot (or in socks) does it for you. Many would be surprised at how much lift even most sneakers have. If not sufficient, while it’s a moderate pain, the barbell can also be set up on top of up to three plates lying flat per side (maybe more but that is the most I’ve used for any purpose.) On becoming able to lift the heavier weight, then reduce the added height.[/quote]

Heh, unfortunately the folks at California Family Fitness don’t let me deadlift is socks anymore. Yes, I know, time to join a new gym.

I like the 10 sets of 2 idea. I doubt I could get 10 sets, as for some reason pulling the 385 off the floor is what really drains me, not the subsequent reps.

I also think part of the problem is fear. I jacked up my back about 7 - 8 months ago. I couldn’t deadlift and was in pain on and off for 2 months. Whenever I go for a max pull now I always have the thought in the back of my mind, “if it doesn’t go up, don’t force it”.

Thanks for your ideas, I hope to hit it in the next month.

Oops, forgot the other quote tag. n/m just realized you can edit. Cool.

[quote]elusive wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
pull 385 x 6

x2. I was going to mention this. Get your reps up higher with 385 and 405 will come.[/quote]

Hehe, you guys are probably right.

[quote]markdp wrote:
elusive wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
pull 385 x 6

x2. I was going to mention this. Get your reps up higher with 385 and 405 will come.

Hehe, you guys are probably right.[/quote]

more like definately right

plus unless youre a PLer who gives a shit what you lift for one?

i used to only be able to pull 405x2

then it was 385x5

385x9

405x5

405x8

425x7

all those were done DOH w/o straps, i used to try and hit 3 sets of 6 reps then progess after but i did better after doing 1 all out set of 6-8 deadlifts are really hard and taxing to do more than one set of 5+ reps of

i dont know what i DL now but im pretty sure i could get 500 off the floor and do easy reps with 425, especially if i used straps.