T Nation

Canadian Dollar Rises Against US


#1

Canada: Can you feel a Biotest Order happening soon?

http://www.cbc.ca/money/story/2009/06/01/canada-dollar-rise-june.html

Currently: 100.00 USD = 108.570 CAD

Can't wait for the usual summer oil price surge and the inverse of the current price to be a reality. If it weren't for the shipping and taxes we might pay less for our supps than the Americans!

Imagine if Biotest would ship as gift...


#2

yeah, we Canadians always get jipped/ dinged with shipping and customs fees.

I'm actually planning my next order this month, I should really monitor the currency trends.


#3

Man, I'd love to order some Biotest stuff. But like said, those shipping charges are a bitch.


#4

Expecting a child in mid-July :slight_smile: ... & just ran out of Surge. The wife & I just consolidated our debts so the CCs are out the window. Gotta sell some stuff on eBay & shit to put some $$ together to reup on the good stuff. Really want to try the Surge Workout Fuel (fingers crossed)

Wish me luck.

**Rattler: Shipping charges are actually on par & decent - this comes from a guy that works as shipper receiver & deals with Fedex/UPS/USPS all day long, dude. Can't really complain unless you are only buying one bottle of stuff, buying in bulk or splitting an order with another person works too to disperse costs...


#5

I'm lucky a buddy with a post office box in Michagan picks up my orders for me.Flameout is worth every penny.After years of heavy factory work my elbows were fucked,Flameout has helped alot.


#6

The trend in US Canadian is going to continue. Soon it will be .80 U.S. to 1 Canadian, I guarantee it.


#7

It will likely continue, but going that low would actually be very bad news for Canadians because a great deal of their economic activity thrives when the USD is stronger (oil sands, timber-related products, auto manufacturing). For example, many of the large Canadian companies posted really poor results in 2007 and the first half of 2008, specifically for this reason alone. A revisitation of a 1:1 ratio so quickly could be enough to sink many of those companies.

So, a 0.8 exchange rate might be good for Canadians' purchasing power, it may be very costly economically. Not to mention that it could have very negative implications for all of the infrastructure projects that the provinces have planned over the next few years since most of the debt-funding for these projects is expected to come from non-Canadian banks.

DB


#8

The manufacturing sector represents 14% of Canada's GDP, I know it's a sizable chunk but I feel that the media tends to over hype of the ill effects of a strong Canadian dollar. It really all depends on what economic perspective you want to take. Personally I feel like Canadians import far more than we export, which means we are exporting a lot of our wealth to other nations (wealth that is mainly derived from natural resources). Slashes in commodity prices are far worse for Canadians than an increase in the strength of our dollar.

Plus, with free trade and globalization Canadians should be looking to invest in something other than manufacturing which will likely be outsourced soon enough anyway.


#9

Fortunately or unfortunately, what any one of us thinks doesn't change the fact that Canada exports more than it imports and the U.S. purchases approximately 80% of the Canadian export goods. A strengthening CAD (vis-a-vis the USD) means that Canadian products are becoming less affordable for Americans and therefore, less attractive. It's basic macro-economics.

Agriculture and Industry account for nearly 1/3rd of Canadian GDP. These industries tend to be susceptible to wide swings in currencies. How much of that market can you afford to lose before it takes a toll on your economy? If I knew the answer, I wouldn't need to work for a living.

DB