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Can Test Make You Breathless?


#1

hey
so I've been getting breathless recently (last 2 weeks) and don't no why nothing has changed in my training, diet or weight gain, i no oral steroids can cause breathlessness but i am not taking any now i am just on 250mg of sust 3 times a week, is it possible this could be causing breathlessness?

Kerley


#2

I’ve experienced the same thing when I was on cycle. It also made my quads KILL when I was biking. It is probably a result of the high blood pressure.


#3

How’s your blood pressure?


#4

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#5

blood pressure is 109 over 94 is that high?


#6

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#7

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
Your diastolic is high-ish which would make sense due to ‘residual pressure’ in the system due to increased blood volume.

BBB[/quote]

but it’s nothing to worry about?

thanks guys


#8

94 is certainly something you don’t want long term. My systolic shoots up, but my diastolic is always between 70-80… typically towards 70 rather than 80.

Don’t forget it is the diastolic (the lower number) which is correlated with morbitity, moreso that systolic. Diastolic is the figure to watch in terms of end-organ damage, such as nephron/retinal damage.

What are your figures off-cycle?


#9

Very well put, Dave.

Kerley, it’s definitely not something that you want to ignore, but at the same time, BP results can vary widely depending on numerous internal or external factors, and that 94 might be an outlier. I had one nurse that used a cuff that was too small given my arm musculature and the readings dropped considerably when I had the physician re-test me. Point is, don’t sweat it, but follow up and take any necessary steps to make sure you’re not jeopardizing your health.


#10

[quote]Dave_ wrote:
94 is certainly something you don’t want long term. My systolic shoots up, but my diastolic is always between 70-80… typically towards 70 rather than 80.

Don’t forget it is the diastolic (the lower number) which is correlated with morbitity, moreso that systolic. Diastolic is the figure to watch in terms of end-organ damage, such as nephron/retinal damage.

What are your figures off-cycle?[/quote]

i don’t actually no the numbers but off cycle my GP says it fine when ever i get it checked.


#11

I’m actually having this problem as well.I always seem to be short of breath.Also my heart seems like it is beating a little faster and I have a hard time after working on getting my heart rate down.Might be normal when running test E at 750mgs a week(just switched to test prop at 350mgs a week) and Tren ace at 350mgs a week.adex at .5mgs ED.Just so u know where I’m at.Also my weight is 215 5’5" and about 18% body fat age 40.

I don’t think it is anything crazy but I am going to go to the walk in clinic to get this checked out just to be safe.

Can u give me an idea on what tests I should ask for?

I know the dr isn’t an idiot and he will more then likely run everything but I would like to have a list just in case he misses something.

Once I get the results and his diagnosis I would still like to post the results to get some feedback.

Hopefully I’m not hijacking ur thread but just thought it was a good place to post this question.

Thanks.

Also if there is already a list of tests posted on another thread I would appreciate the link.


#12

[quote]deafwoody wrote:
and Tren ace at 350mgs a week…
[/quote]

Good odds that it’s the tren. But as BBB mentioned earlier to Kerley, standard blood work looking at hematocrit & RBC levels would be a good starting point. Frankly, anyone that runs a lot of cycles should check up on that every year or so.


#13

All AAS do me… deca, test, tren… estrogen seems to have little effect as i have done non-aromatising cycles and suffered.

HOWEVER… when deca did it to me it was with doses around 500mg/wk BUT it was a product i highly suspect to be a low dose test… So chew on that.

300mg of organon Deca did not give that side - but of course the dose differs.


#14

Dave_, your a doctor right?

I was also until recently under the impression that diastolic BP is the stronger predictor of morbidity, but actually the cardiovascular risk factor assessment tools that GPs use in Australia (which are based off the Framingham study equations) only factor in systolic. Any insight into this?


#15

I also was taught this - simply as it is the pressure when the heart is not contracted… suggesting arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis rather than increased volumes…


#16

Depends on your age,

above 50 to 60 years old, systolic blood pressure is associated with higher morbidity.

younger individuals are more at risk for elevated blood pressure.

However, a low diastolic with a normal or elevated systolic blood pressure is not a good thing as pulse pressure (SBP-DBP) is also a associated with higher morbidity.

There is theoretical logic behing both systolic and diastolic bp to be risk factors. Mean arterial pressure is usually (grossly) measured as 1/3 SBP + 2/3, therefore DBP where DBP represents the majority of the pressure on the vascular wall. On the other hand, SBP while shorter can be much higher generating higher quantities of sheer stress on the vascular wall.

As for the OP’s symptoms, Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids can cause dyspnea through a variety of mechanism.

On the top of my head I would say,

Elevated hematocrit (secondary to increased RBC formation by AAS) which increases blood viscosity which increases the work of the heart to maintain blood flow.

Myocardial infarct or pulmonary embolism secondary to increased viscosity/activation of coagulation pathways by AAS

Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to elevated BP (2 to increased hematocrit and increased heart remoddeling by AAS) or myocarditis

There probably are other causes but they don’t spring to my mind right now.

Hope this helps,
AlexH