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Can Paxil Affect Muscle Gains?

I’m taking Paxil for a chemical imbalance and was wondering if it will affect my muscle gains or will it screw with my neurochemicals and make me gain some fat?

Though different antidepressants vary, all of them do seem to cause weight gain. It has something to do with hormone restriction and reduced metabolism (plus some cravings).

I was on Paxil for 5 years with no increase in BF% (maybe because I started the meds at 16). I switched to Effexor three years ago and gained 30 lbs. in 6 months. I lost most of it when I started lifting 2 years ago, but I gain fat more easily than I should, I think.

I’ve seen no evidence that antidepressants affect muscle gain. It hasn’t been a problem for me. I just reduce my caloric intake to 300-400 cals below what is recommended for gaining at my size and fat gain is not a huge problem.

Not sure about the weight gains, but don’t stop taking it cold turkey.

[quote]mwyatt wrote:
Though different antidepressants vary, all of them do seem to cause weight gain. It has something to do with hormone restriction and reduced metabolism (plus some cravings).

I was on Paxil for 5 years with no increase in BF% (maybe because I started the meds at 16). I switched to Effexor three years ago and gained 30 lbs. in 6 months. I lost most of it when I started lifting 2 years ago, but I gain fat more easily than I should, I think.

I’ve seen no evidence that antidepressants affect muscle gain. It hasn’t been a problem for me. I just reduce my caloric intake to 300-400 cals below what is recommended for gaining at my size and fat gain is not a huge problem.

[/quote]

I read it increases dopamone and changes you norpinepherine out put, anyone lse know anything about the hormonal or body changes it does?

[quote]muscle818 wrote:
I read it increases dopamone and changes you norpinepherine out put, anyone lse know anything about the hormonal or body changes it does?[/quote]

It actually decreases dopamine output, leading to increased prolactin, which can then lead to lower testosterone levels. This can be a good thing if you naturally have too much dopamine floating around. It’s a little simplistic as there are many other variables going on.

If it leads to a more stable mental life, I wouldn’t worry about the whole hormonal thing though. Leading a happier life is much more important than a few pounds of muscle.

[quote]mwyatt wrote:
Effexor three years ago and gained 30 lbs. in 6 months.[/quote]

I gained a bit more than that when put on Effexor, but I was told it was just b/c my general well being an having an appetite back. So I would think that anti-depressants, work in that matter that you feel well an your appetite (if it was low to begin with)returns.

It’s a little more complex than that.
You see, Antidepressants and anti-psychotics were mostly created to alter an area of the brain called the Hypothalamus Pituitary-Adrenal Axis (HPA),which is a system of hormones and glands. As anyone well knows,these hormones within the HPA regulate serotonin.

This HPA system has a group of steroid hormones called Glucocorticoids, which regulate carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. However, this HPA system really needs to be in balance for the body to function properly,like it should.

Although the human brain usually makes up 2% of our overall body mass, our brain will use up to around 50% of glucose in the body,which is depended on by the brain for energy. The activation of the adrenal system inhibits glucose uptake by tissue by inhibiting insulin release.

Insulin resistance is produced, but hepatic glucose production is also increased.
Then Neuroglycopenia happens. Due to the decrease in brain glucose, it will activate other portions of the brain that release proteins, which stimulate food intake,etc.

I’m thinking when this happens,an increase in body weight is pretty much inevitable-especially when the increase in fat mass generates a feedback signal to insulin and other hormones.
The feedback signal is activated, which results in continued insulin resistance, hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

Then there’s liptin, which is also altered by glucocorticoid.