T Nation

Can of Peaches?

I buy a bulk can of sliced peaches and after a workout or for breakfast I will eat around 30 slices. Its roughly around 350 calories of pure sliced peaches. Then I read this in an article

-The only thing I recommend you limit is your consumption of fructose, especially in the form of high fructose corn syrup. Since fructose does nothing to replenish skeletal muscle glycogen stores and can easily be converted to fat, it’s not something you want to consume a great deal of.-

Is the can of peaches beneficial? Is it a good way to increase insulin levels and restore glycogen? Or is it just gonna make me fat?
thanks

[quote]Hawkson101 wrote:
I buy a bulk can of sliced peaches and after a workout or for breakfast I will eat around 30 slices. Its roughly around 350 calories of pure sliced peaches. Then I read this in an article

-The only thing I recommend you limit is your consumption of fructose, especially in the form of high fructose corn syrup. Since fructose does nothing to replenish skeletal muscle glycogen stores and can easily be converted to fat, it’s not something you want to consume a great deal of.-

Is the can of peaches beneficial? Is it a good way to increase insulin levels and restore glycogen? Or is it just gonna make me fat?
thanks[/quote]

Fruit is pretty much delicate from a nutritional standpoint. The Hheat used in the canning process to sufficiently destroy micro-organisms and food enzymes also generally affects other properties of foods adversely. Its not such a deal with stuff like Tuna, but fruit, you might as well not bother if you are looking for some nutrional aspects beyond the sugar.

This is my take on it as a food scientist rather than someone trying to give you nutritional advice.

Ask someone else about the Fructose, liver thing or maybe someome will read this and add some comments.

I’m in general agreement with the initial statement. Fructose does not do much to replenish muscle glycogen content. Aside from that, they are usually packed in juice which is loaded with more sugar. For breakfast if you want fruit try eating a peach.

For post-workout why not just buy some dextrose and mix it with your protein (assuming you’re not buying Surge to support the site that gives all sorts of free info). It’s cheap and you can usually get it at make-your-own-wine shops and bulk food stores.

As a warning, high fructose corn syrup is sometimes found in Gatorade powder in Canada which is sometimes recommended for post-workout.

I didn’t know you were a food scientist Stigg, but there again why would I??

Might be a bit of a dopey question seeing as how they aren’t in cans, but what do you know about the “new” way of packing peaches and pineapple in those little plastic tubs, the ones that are supposedly packed in their own juice. Asda & Tesco do them over here. I’d guess that they’d be a better choice than canned but only marginally or good enough to eat?

[quote]Mr Beeks wrote:
I didn’t know you were a food scientist Stigg, but there again why would I??

Might be a bit of a dopey question seeing as how they aren’t in cans, but what do you know about the “new” way of packing peaches and pineapple in those little plastic tubs, the ones that are supposedly packed in their own juice. Asda & Tesco do them over here. I’d guess that they’d be a better choice than canned but only marginally or good enough to eat?

[/quote]

These are no better than regular canned. The only benefit is, you can easily seal them in their container if you don’t polish them all off in one go. I know the ones you mean, they say ‘1kg Fridge Fruit’ on the label, talk about re-inventing the wheel.