T Nation

Can I Get a DL Form Check?

The heavier sets failed to record for whatever reason, but here is one of my lighter singles if anyone wants to check my form. I did 370 two sets after and had a major nosebleed, which pretty much ended my day. I had to do a good warmup after that, and decided to do some triples with 315-335 since I was thrown off. I felt like I could have pulled more than that today if the nosebleed didn’t throw me off. Anyways, I know there is many lifters here that are experienced (I haven’t even been training a year and a half; I’m 17 years old and 158 lbs) and could hopefully give me some advice. Thanks.

Why are you using straps? Taking so long to put straps on could make you lose the little bit of stretch-reflex that you would normally get while setting up. Plus you don’t exactly have a ton of weight on the bar–if your grip can’t handle that little weight, you’ve got a problem.

[quote]OmniStyx wrote:
Why are you using straps? Taking so long to put straps on could make you lose the little bit of stretch-reflex that you would normally get while setting up. Plus you don’t exactly have a ton of weight on the bar–if your grip can’t handle that little weight, you’ve got a problem.[/quote]

I can hold that weight with a mixed grip, but I feel uncomfortable with it. For today, I used straps, since it was a max effort day, but I am trying to get more practice with a hook grip.

There are proponents of training with straps and proponents of training with mixed grip/chalk, you just need to find what works best for you and groove it in so that your set-up is quick and replicable. At any rate, I’d also agree that you’re taking a bit long to initiate the lift. Additionally, although it’s hard to tell with the belt and the sweater, there also appears to be some lumbar rounding going on. Really focus on welding that spine into a solid, neutral line.

I believe you can get your hips down a little bit more, wherein you can use your lower body even more on heavier attempts. Obviously not so low where your hips are too far from the bar.

I also think the setup with the straps is in the long run going to be detrimental rather than beneficial. It seems as if the set up takes way too long there is some credence of the grip and rip attitude towards pulling. It also seems that you may be pulling up with your toes a bit and not back with your heels.

[quote]kgildner wrote:
There are proponents of training with straps and proponents of training with mixed grip/chalk, you just need to find what works best for you and groove it in so that your set-up is quick and replicable. At any rate, I’d also agree that you’re taking a bit long to initiate the lift. Additionally, although it’s hard to tell with the belt and the sweater, there also appears to be some lumbar rounding going on. Really focus on welding that spine into a solid, neutral line.[/quote]

I would agree with you there. If my phone wasn’t having issues at the moment I would reply with video of a lighter deadlift, where it rounds less. Maybe later today.

Keep your hips a little bit lower and keep your back straight. And drop the straps, lowering the weights will ease this. Keep at it, training makes champion!

Listen to what everyone on here is saying for sure, but I also noticed that at the top of the lift you got on your toes, which is not good. try to keep your heels planted into the ground.

Absolutely need to drop the straps. The only thing it’s going to do is prevent you from increasing grip strength. And if you want to work on your hook grip, work on it. But using a hook grip with straps is not going to help it nearly as much as it would without the straps.

If the heaviest sets didn’t record and your lower back is already starting to round during the semi-heavy sets, I’m sure it’s worse on the max effort sets. The time to fix this issue is now while you’re young and just starting out, not a couple years from now when you’re lifting much more and the improper technique is already engrained. Work on your hip flexibility and lower-body mobility in general. DeFranco’s agile 8 is a great for this. Do it before any deadlift/squat workout (although I wouldn’t do the static stretch before lifting, just the first 7), and do all 8 a few other times a week. If you deadlift twice a week (some kind of DE or RE work on the 2nd day?), do lots and lots of singles somewhere at 50-80% and really focus on keeping that spine locked in. Same thing when you work up on max effort days, and consider doing just a bunch of singles at 90-92.5%, and not pulling true 1RMs until the form improves.

It’s better form than most you’ll see in the gym, and a lot of weight for your age/BW. But the time to perfect form and technique is now before the bad habits are engrained.

As Umbrata notes, you don’t want to be finishing with the weight on your toes like this. Really focus on driving through your heels. That should also help a bit with keeping your spine in a safe, straight alignment.

I don’t have time right now to reply individually to all of you, but it seems like really good advice, and that is what I came here for. Thankyou.