T Nation

Calling All Fencers!!!

I am calling all fencers to share their weightlifting routines,plyometric training and conditioning and other training they do beside fencing on this thread.

Such information is very rare on the net and as you all know many fencers use traditional only fencing routine.
So,any bit of advice is very valuable!


Fencers weight lifting routine should target posterior chain and legs.muscle imbalance (left side-right side) should be addresssed.
Plyometric training should be utilisized for both legs and upper-body.
specific agility and quickness program must be used for lunging nad recovering.

Howdy BALBOS it’s been a long time. Man how I wished you had been killed in some tragic goat herding accident.

So you ask how fencers train in one post, and then proceed to tell them how they should train in the next…??

Post count for Balbos +2

Sorry, “texas-supreme”.

There is no fencing specific weightlifting routine on internet.
Routines of National Fencing Teams are being kept secret.
Lifting weights is not so important in fencing,anyway

[quote]texas-supreme wrote:
I am calling all fencers to share their weightlifting routines,plyometric training and conditioning and other training they do beside fencing on this thread.

Such information is very rare on the net and as you all know many fencers use traditional only fencing routine.
So,any bit of advice is very valuable![/quote]

Im not a “modern” fencer. However i do Historycal and Ancent Sword combat.

I mean I have done :wink:

I train on old (from 1400 AD to 1700AD) books. The weapon are different, heavier and you need to improve control and resistence on both shoulder/arm and legs

my weapon of choices are the “one hand and half” sword and the small axes (“francisca”)

the better results I get from training was improve the grip and the shoulder resistence. Also abs workout is very important…

Hello anyone in Melbourne Australia
Could you tell me any good fencing schools as I’d like to learn

[quote]hammerhead wrote:
There is no fencing specific weightlifting routine on internet.
Routines of National Fencing Teams are being kept secret.
Lifting weights is not so important in fencing,anyway

                 [/quote]

Weightlifting is not important in fencing??!! Are you joking?

[quote]hammerhead wrote:
There is no fencing specific weightlifting routine on internet.
Routines of National Fencing Teams are being kept secret.
Lifting weights is not so important in fencing,anyway
[/quote]

I’m afraid I’d have to disagree with you there. I fenced on the collegiate circuit for three years, and there is quite a bit of explosion that is necessary to compete at the higher levels. True, there are a number of fencers who get by on technique alone, as I’d wager that’s the most important aspect of fencing. But I have, on a number of occasions, seen better ‘fencers’ beaten by better athletes. In fact, seeing as I didn’t fence before college, I was often the one who won by being the better athlete. The explosion I acquired from lifting was instrumental in that. Sometimes strictly technique fencers just get ‘outrun’ on strip and get tired and their technique goes. Other times they get overpowered.

Obviously, the degree to which explosion is important varies depending on weapon. I fenced sabre, explosion was crucial.

As far as training specifics…squats and squat jumps, deadlifts, dips, grip work, agility work and loads of stretching-- all provided great benefits.

TW

[quote]hammerhead wrote:
There is no fencing specific weightlifting routine on internet.
Routines of National Fencing Teams are being kept secret.
Lifting weights is not so important in fencing,anyway

                 [/quote]

Power is very important in fencing.
Top fencers usually broad jump over 3 meters.One-leg strength and power is crucial.

A sound fencing weightlifting routine would include–
1.Olympic lifts,variations of Olympic lifts and its hybrids
2.power lifts+ rows,military press,weighted chins and dips
3.pistols,one-arm push-ups,dumbell unilateral variations of main strenght exercises
4.specific ab,oblique and grip work
5.strongman GPP conditioning
6.isometric work with weights and body weight

Also on the subject of conditioning–
many top fencers do
1.long runs
2.rowing
3.swimmimng
4.cycling
5.callistenics

I wonder if this is counter-productive to quickness and power needed for fencing,but I guess it works for them.
Keeth Smart,for example,does 2 hours of running,cycling and weightlifting every day in addition to 4 hours of fencing-practice!

Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?

[quote]Lou Garu wrote:
Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?[/quote]

Are you suggesting that competitive fencing is not testosterone-fueled?
Or hard-core?

[quote]Sabre T wrote:
hammerhead wrote:
There is no fencing specific weightlifting routine on internet.
Routines of National Fencing Teams are being kept secret.
Lifting weights is not so important in fencing,anyway

I’m afraid I’d have to disagree with you there. I fenced on the collegiate circuit for three years, and there is quite a bit of explosion that is necessary to compete at the higher levels. True, there are a number of fencers who get by on technique alone, as I’d wager that’s the most important aspect of fencing. But I have, on a number of occasions, seen better ‘fencers’ beaten by better athletes. In fact, seeing as I didn’t fence before college, I was often the one who won by being the better athlete. The explosion I acquired from lifting was instrumental in that. Sometimes strictly technique fencers just get ‘outrun’ on strip and get tired and their technique goes. Other times they get overpowered.

Obviously, the degree to which explosion is important varies depending on weapon. I fenced sabre, explosion was crucial.

As far as training specifics…squats and squat jumps, deadlifts, dips, grip work, agility work and loads of stretching-- all provided great benefits.

TW
[/quote]

Could you be more specific and post your fencing routine,weight lifting routine,conditioning routine and cross-training routine!

[quote]luburic wrote:
Lou Garu wrote:
Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?

Are you suggesting that competitive fencing is not testosterone-fueled?
Or hard-core?[/quote]

No, just that’s it’s the kind of sport only found in the media and on TV in the U.S. at about 2 AM in between curling and tractor pulls.

[quote]Kuz wrote:
luburic wrote:
Lou Garu wrote:
Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?

Are you suggesting that competitive fencing is not testosterone-fueled?
Or hard-core?

No, just that’s it’s the kind of sport only found in the media and on TV in the U.S. at about 2 AM in between curling and tractor pulls.[/quote]

So,it seems that you watch television a lot.
Try playing some sport,instead.

[quote]luburic wrote:
hammerhead wrote:
There is no fencing specific weightlifting routine on internet.
Routines of National Fencing Teams are being kept secret.
Lifting weights is not so important in fencing,anyway

Power is very important in fencing.
Top fencers usually broad jump over 3 meters.One-leg strength and power is crucial.

A sound fencing weightlifting routine would include–
1.Olympic lifts,variations of Olympic lifts and its hybrids
2.power lifts+ rows,military press,weighted chins and dips
3.pistols,one-arm push-ups,dumbell unilateral variations of main strenght exercises
4.specific ab,oblique and grip work
5.strongman GPP conditioning
6.isometric work with weights and body weight
[/quote]

I forgot one great fencing-specific exercise- HEAVY BARBELL LUNGES!
Also barbell step- ups,bulgarian split-squats,reverse lunges,overhead squat

[quote]luburic wrote:
Kuz wrote:
luburic wrote:
Lou Garu wrote:
Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?

Are you suggesting that competitive fencing is not testosterone-fueled?
Or hard-core?

No, just that’s it’s the kind of sport only found in the media and on TV in the U.S. at about 2 AM in between curling and tractor pulls.

So,it seems that you watch television a lot.
Try playing some sport,instead.
[/quote]

head shaking

Your reading comprehension needs some work, but then again, so does your English. Just because it’s on, doesn’t mean I watch it.

I am fairly confident in my sporting abilities. I’m terribly sorry if I haven’t gotten around to do something as “neat” as fencing. Probably too busy playing soccer, golf, football, mountain biking…

[quote]Kuz wrote:
luburic wrote:
Kuz wrote:
luburic wrote:
Lou Garu wrote:
Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?

Are you suggesting that competitive fencing is not testosterone-fueled?
Or hard-core?

No, just that’s it’s the kind of sport only found in the media and on TV in the U.S. at about 2 AM in between curling and tractor pulls.

So,it seems that you watch television a lot.
Try playing some sport,instead.

head shaking

Your reading comprehension needs some work, but then again, so does your English. Just because it’s on, doesn’t mean I watch it.

I am fairly confident in my sporting abilities. I’m terribly sorry if I haven’t gotten around to do something as “neat” as fencing. Probably too busy playing soccer, golf, football, mountain biking…[/quote]

Man,all respect to you,but this thread is about fencing and preparing for fencing,not about ignorant self-proclaimed athletes bashing olympic combat sport with great history.

Golf,you say? Yeah,thats hard-core for sure!!
Golf,you say

[quote]Kuz wrote:
luburic wrote:
Lou Garu wrote:
Am I on T-Nation or watching ESPN 5?

Are you suggesting that competitive fencing is not testosterone-fueled?
Or hard-core?

No, just that’s it’s the kind of sport only found in the media and on TV in the U.S. at about 2 AM in between curling and tractor pulls.[/quote]

Are you talking about biceps-curling?
Or bowling?
Ha ha ha !!! Tractor pulls?! Whats that? Is that tractor race?