T Nation

Call for the Geeks

Hi there.

I dunno if here’s the right place for my question, but it seems to be the right place.
Ok, so here’s the question:

Everybody knows you have to “reload” your glycogen reserves after training, so you’ll be able to train again the next day. So far, so good. Now here comes my question: If I don’t load carbohydrates after training, but limit myself to protein and fat, will that hinder anabolism?
If so, why? Like, biochemically I mean. Would the muscle lack nutrients? Would the body start converting muscle protein to glycogen in order to replenish the exhausted stores?

Now it’s up to the geeks. Looking forward to reading your replies.

By the way, english isn’t my native language, so don’t fret if there’s linguistical errors in the text.

Protein would be metabolized for energy, same thing with fats. Anabolism isn’t dependant on carbs.

Fat will slow down the rate at which your body digests protein, therefore having fat as your post-workout macro is not optimal. Just get a high GI carb source, problem solved.

Insulin is the anabolic hormone and Glucagon is the catabolic hormone. The reason you want to eat fast acting carbs and protein after you workout is because the carbs will cause insulin to increase, this then leads to a greater absorption of protein. The protein is then delivered to your muscles for growth and repair. (I’m assuming thats what you meant by “reload” glycogen.

Biochemically,
When you work out the body uses up the glucose for energy and when you run out of glucose the body goes to the glycogen reserves of the muscle and liver. When liver glycogen runs out the hormone glucagon is released. At this point your body is essentially in a catabolic state. Glucagon is released when your body senses really low levels of glucose in the blood. Glucogenesis then takes place and the body pretty much starts breaking down fats and protein to use as energy. If you continue working out then it’s pretty much protein being broken down because the body cannot breakdown fats during high intensity training.

Sooo… when you’re done training you want to supply the body with food as soon as possible. Preferable carbs/glucose because that’s the bodys preferred source of energy, and it increases insulin. It just takes too long for fats to be converted and during that time your body is eating up the protein as a fuel source so no growth and repair can occur. Thats why carbs and proteins after training is better than fats and protein.

Hope this helps, feel free to ask if you need anything elaborated.

[quote]angus_beef wrote:
Insulin is the anabolic hormone and Glucagon is the catabolic hormone. The reason you want to eat fast acting carbs and protein after you workout is because the carbs will cause insulin to increase, this then leads to a greater absorption of protein. The protein is then delivered to your muscles for growth and repair. (I’m assuming thats what you meant by “reload” glycogen.

Biochemically,
When you work out the body uses up the glucose for energy and when you run out of glucose the body goes to the glycogen reserves of the muscle and liver. When liver glycogen runs out the hormone glucagon is released. At this point your body is essentially in a catabolic state. Glucagon is released when your body senses really low levels of glucose in the blood. Glucogenesis then takes place and the body pretty much starts breaking down fats and protein to use as energy. If you continue working out then it’s pretty much protein being broken down because the body cannot breakdown fats during high intensity training.

Sooo… when you’re done training you want to supply the body with food as soon as possible. Preferable carbs/glucose because that’s the bodys preferred source of energy, and it increases insulin. It just takes too long for fats to be converted and during that time your body is eating up the protein as a fuel source so no growth and repair can occur. Thats why carbs and proteins after training is better than fats and protein.

Hope this helps, feel free to ask if you need anything elaborated.

[/quote]

[Slaps his head] Doh!
Yes, of course, didn’t think of the insulin response.

Thank you, just what I was looking for. Perfect!
Cheers,

Lukas