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Calf Strectch Question

When I try to ass to grass squat, even without weight, I can’t. I know of the stretches to do, but they are all associated with tight hamstrings or calves. The pain I’m feeling though is along my shin area. After going down to horizontal, well just past, I have to really start bending forward with my upper body to balance the weight so I don’t flop onto my back.It’s when I do this that the pain starts. This is what I have to do to feel the spot thats causing problems during deep squats:

Is this still the considered part of the calf muscle or is it something else?

[quote]Skrussian wrote:
When I try to ass to grass squat, even without weight, I can’t. I know of the stretches to do, but they are all associated with tight hamstrings or calves. The pain I’m feeling though is along my shin area. After going down to horizontal, well just past, I have to really start bending forward with my upper body to balance the weight so I don’t flop onto my back.It’s when I do this that the pain starts. This is what I have to do to feel the spot thats causing problems during deep squats:

Is this still the considered part of the calf muscle or is it something else? [/quote]

Do you stretch your shins?

If you don’t that could be the problem. There are 2 that I use:

http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=body_89lazy

If you go to the “Stretches before a lower body workout” section I use the second stretch for my shins but I do it in a much more compact manner (it looks similar to someone about to run the 100m.

http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=05-085-training

The second one is the first picture in this article.

Combined with some foam rolling you should notice some dramatic differences.

[quote]Skrussian wrote:

Is this still the considered part of the calf muscle or is it something else? [/quote]

That looks like a soleus stretch. The calf is made up of the gastroc and the soleus.

The gastrocnemius is the more visible part of the calf (the two heads you see when you stand on your toes). It attaches to your achilles, and is both stretched and strengthened when the knee is straight.

The soleus lies just under the gastroc, closer to bones. The soleus is stretched and strengthened with a bent knee position.

Are you experiencing pain on the front of the lower leg (shin) or on the side of the lower leg close to the bone? Also, is in medial or lateral pain?

[quote]Skrussian wrote:

Is this still the considered part of the calf muscle or is it something else? [/quote]

That looks like a soleus stretch. The calf is made up of the gastroc and the soleus.

The gastrocnemius is the more visible part of the calf (the two heads you see when you stand on your toes). It attaches to your achilles, and is both stretched and strengthened when the knee is straight.

The soleus lies just under the gastroc, closer to bones. The soleus is stretched and strengthened with a bent knee position.

Are you experiencing pain on the front of the lower leg (shin) or on the side of the lower leg close to the bone? Also, is in medial or lateral pain?

front of the lower leg

[quote]Skrussian wrote:
front of the lower leg[/quote]

Towards the inside front of the lower leg or the outside?

It’s on both. Today I tried angling my feet a bit more outwards and it worked, but should I be looking to keep it below a certain angle so I don’t put a lot of stress on the hip sockets? I’d say they’re maybe around 20-25 degrees from straight right now.