T Nation

Calf Sprain, Tear or Something

I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.

Give it a few days. If pain persists… come back here.

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WTF, I’m here everyday anyway!

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric).

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

I should probably mention I am a Physical Therapist, Board Certified Specialist in Orthopaedics and Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist.

-Frank Merritt, PT, OCS, CSCS

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction. You are absolutely correct in that sprains refer to ligaments. I was juggling several things when I responded to the OP, I brain cramped.

I’m not questioning your background in the subject. However, you’ll note that many of the theories I stated are in line with yours.

There is an important distinction, however. My posts were much more general - and for good reason. It is a risk to try and give exact medical diagnosis and specific medical advice over an internet forum.

The main difference between my post and yours is that mine pointed the compass in (to the best of my knowledge) the right direction. Your post attempts to give the exact gps coordinates. If you are correct, you become the hero for the day. But if you’re wrong, there is the chance you expose yourself legally.

I’m confident the OP isn’t the litigating sort. And I’m equally confident your intentions are in the right place. Be advised: things may not be so rosy in future encounters with other people online.

This is a respectful heads up, from one Strength and Conditioning Professional to another.

OP, FWIW, I sincerely feel it’s in your best interest to hedge your bets and see a medical professional first and foremost. As I and frmerritt noted, it most likely is not a grade 3 issue. Even if it is only grade 1, it’s best to know exactly where the injury is.

At the fundamental level, this is the difference between myself and the other poster. You can accuse me of being a nervous Nelly. However, I subscribe to the belief that another IN PERSON view of the situation (even if I am convinced I know what is going on) is ultimately in the client’s best interest. You only have one body. It’s up to you to decide whether or not it’s worth it to know EXACTLY what’s going on as opposed what is Most Likely going on.

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction. You are absolutely correct in that sprains refer to ligaments. I was juggling several things when I responded to the OP, I brain cramped.

I’m not questioning your background in the subject. However, you’ll note that many of the theories I stated are in line with yours.

There is an important distinction, however. My posts were much more general - and for good reason. It is a risk to try and give exact medical diagnosis and specific medical advice over an internet forum.

The main difference between my post and yours is that mine pointed the compass in (to the best of my knowledge) the right direction. Your post attempts to give the exact gps coordinates. If you are correct, you become the hero for the day. But if you’re wrong, there is the chance you expose yourself legally.

I’m confident the OP isn’t the litigating sort. And I’m equally confident your intentions are in the right place. Be advised: things may not be so rosy in future encounters with other people online.

This is a respectful heads up, from one Strength and Conditioning Professional to another.

OP, FWIW, I sincerely feel it’s in your best interest to hedge your bets and see a medical professional first and foremost. As I and frmerritt noted, it most likely is not a grade 3 issue. Even if it is only grade 1, it’s best to know exactly where the injury is.

At the fundamental level, this is the difference between myself and the other poster. You can accuse me of being a nervous Nelly. However, I subscribe to the belief that another IN PERSON view of the situation (even if I am convinced I know what is going on) is ultimately in the client’s best interest. You only have one body. It’s up to you to decide whether or not it’s worth it to know EXACTLY what’s going on as opposed what is Most Likely going on.
[/quote]

Having worked closely alongside highly regarded Orthopaedic physicians for over 20 years and experienced many 1st and 2nd degree strains (none of which required significantly complicated medical intervention),it is my professional opinion that it is entirely unnecessary to schedule an appointment with a medical doctor for anything LESS serious than an injury (strain or “sprain”) in the 2nd degree unless you are pill shopping. This is precisely what I initially advised. Read up on the commonly taught and very GENERAL method of RICE used to treat all low grade sprains and strains. There is nothing liable regarding the advice I have given and I encourage you to continue to inquire from any and all professionals along with more reputable research online to best educate yourself regarding commonly seen musculoskeletal injuries and improved rehab outcomes.(And, once again, it is still my advice to see an Orthopedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain- which you can easily determine by reading up on the classification criteria online). Good luck!

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction. You are absolutely correct in that sprains refer to ligaments. I was juggling several things when I responded to the OP, I brain cramped.

I’m not questioning your background in the subject. However, you’ll note that many of the theories I stated are in line with yours.

There is an important distinction, however. My posts were much more general - and for good reason. It is a risk to try and give exact medical diagnosis and specific medical advice over an internet forum.

The main difference between my post and yours is that mine pointed the compass in (to the best of my knowledge) the right direction. Your post attempts to give the exact gps coordinates. If you are correct, you become the hero for the day. But if you’re wrong, there is the chance you expose yourself legally.

I’m confident the OP isn’t the litigating sort. And I’m equally confident your intentions are in the right place. Be advised: things may not be so rosy in future encounters with other people online.

This is a respectful heads up, from one Strength and Conditioning Professional to another.

OP, FWIW, I sincerely feel it’s in your best interest to hedge your bets and see a medical professional first and foremost. As I and frmerritt noted, it most likely is not a grade 3 issue. Even if it is only grade 1, it’s best to know exactly where the injury is.

At the fundamental level, this is the difference between myself and the other poster. You can accuse me of being a nervous Nelly. However, I subscribe to the belief that another IN PERSON view of the situation (even if I am convinced I know what is going on) is ultimately in the client’s best interest. You only have one body. It’s up to you to decide whether or not it’s worth it to know EXACTLY what’s going on as opposed what is Most Likely going on.
[/quote]

Having worked closely alongside highly regarded Orthopaedic physicians for over 20 years and experienced many 1st and 2nd degree strains (none of which required significantly complicated medical intervention),it is my professional opinion that it is entirely unnecessary to schedule an appointment with a medical doctor for anything LESS serious than an injury (strain or “sprain”) in the 2nd degree unless you are pill shopping. This is precisely what I initially advised. Read up on the commonly taught and very GENERAL method of RICE used to treat all low grade sprains and strains. There is nothing liable regarding the advice I have given and I encourage you to continue to inquire from any and all professionals along with more reputable research online to best educate yourself regarding commonly seen musculoskeletal injuries and improved rehab outcomes.(And, once again, it is still my advice to see an Orthopedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain- which you can easily determine by reading up on the classification criteria online). Good luck![/quote]

I think we agree that the OP is most likely not suffering from grade 3 injury.

However, the fact is we cannot know for certain whether or not it’s grade 1 or grade 2.

My original response to the OP on the subject was to have it examined to determine exactly the severity.

Your original response on the subject was to RICE/use NSAIDs and then see someone if the OP feels the issue is greater than a grade 1 issue. I’ll take the liberty of quoting you here:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

As I stated to the OP in last night’s post, the fundamental difference between my suggestion and yours is that I strongly feel the OP should be examined in person first. You differ in that the OP should be examined AFTER doing what your treatment - and I quote here:

“See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.”

With due respect to the OP, I don’t believe he is qualified to make that determination.

Furthermore, neither you nor I (or anyone else) can tell from a few internet posts whether this is grade 1 or 2.

Despite the book knowledge and the experience working with orthos, I feel you are neglecting a key element in this matter: human nature.

It is human nature to want to get back in the game sooner rather than later. It is human nature to want to believe (unless one is a hypochondriac) that your injury is not as severe as it might be.

By following my suggestion to get examined first, the OP removes this element and increases the probability of a more expeditious healing time. If it is grade 1, then the OP has sacrificed what? An hour or two out of his day and the cost of a co-payment. This, I strongly believe, is a small investment on his long term health.

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction. You are absolutely correct in that sprains refer to ligaments. I was juggling several things when I responded to the OP, I brain cramped.

I’m not questioning your background in the subject. However, you’ll note that many of the theories I stated are in line with yours.

There is an important distinction, however. My posts were much more general - and for good reason. It is a risk to try and give exact medical diagnosis and specific medical advice over an internet forum.

The main difference between my post and yours is that mine pointed the compass in (to the best of my knowledge) the right direction. Your post attempts to give the exact gps coordinates. If you are correct, you become the hero for the day. But if you’re wrong, there is the chance you expose yourself legally.

I’m confident the OP isn’t the litigating sort. And I’m equally confident your intentions are in the right place. Be advised: things may not be so rosy in future encounters with other people online.

This is a respectful heads up, from one Strength and Conditioning Professional to another.

OP, FWIW, I sincerely feel it’s in your best interest to hedge your bets and see a medical professional first and foremost. As I and frmerritt noted, it most likely is not a grade 3 issue. Even if it is only grade 1, it’s best to know exactly where the injury is.

At the fundamental level, this is the difference between myself and the other poster. You can accuse me of being a nervous Nelly. However, I subscribe to the belief that another IN PERSON view of the situation (even if I am convinced I know what is going on) is ultimately in the client’s best interest. You only have one body. It’s up to you to decide whether or not it’s worth it to know EXACTLY what’s going on as opposed what is Most Likely going on.
[/quote]

Having worked closely alongside highly regarded Orthopaedic physicians for over 20 years and experienced many 1st and 2nd degree strains (none of which required significantly complicated medical intervention),it is my professional opinion that it is entirely unnecessary to schedule an appointment with a medical doctor for anything LESS serious than an injury (strain or “sprain”) in the 2nd degree unless you are pill shopping. This is precisely what I initially advised. Read up on the commonly taught and very GENERAL method of RICE used to treat all low grade sprains and strains. There is nothing liable regarding the advice I have given and I encourage you to continue to inquire from any and all professionals along with more reputable research online to best educate yourself regarding commonly seen musculoskeletal injuries and improved rehab outcomes.(And, once again, it is still my advice to see an Orthopedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain- which you can easily determine by reading up on the classification criteria online). Good luck![/quote]

I think we agree that the OP is most likely not suffering from grade 3 injury.

However, the fact is we cannot know for certain whether or not it’s grade 1 or grade 2.

My original response to the OP on the subject was to have it examined to determine exactly the severity.

Your original response on the subject was to RICE/use NSAIDs and then see someone if the OP feels the issue is greater than a grade 1 issue. I’ll take the liberty of quoting you here:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

As I stated to the OP in last night’s post, the fundamental difference between my suggestion and yours is that I strongly feel the OP should be examined in person first. You differ in that the OP should be examined AFTER doing what your treatment - and I quote here:

“See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.”

With due respect to the OP, I don’t believe he is qualified to make that determination.

Furthermore, neither you nor I (or anyone else) can tell from a few internet posts whether this is grade 1 or 2.

Despite the book knowledge and the experience working with orthos, I feel you are neglecting a key element in this matter: human nature.

It is human nature to want to get back in the game sooner rather than later. It is human nature to want to believe (unless one is a hypochondriac) that your injury is not as severe as it might be.

By following my suggestion to get examined first, the OP removes this element and increases the probability of a more expeditious healing time. If it is grade 1, then the OP has sacrificed what? An hour or two out of his day and the cost of a co-payment. This, I strongly believe, is a small investment on his long term health.

[/quote]

As trivial and juvenile as this difference of opinion might seem to the casual observer, I do find it to be an interesting debate. I continue to disagree with you for the primary reason that I feel people need to empower themselves with an increased knowledge of their own human body and not rely dependently on others to always tell them what to do. Like it or not, we now live in the age of the Internet- a very valuable resource and, admittedly, risky if you are one to believe everything you read or quickly jump to conclusions. I personally feel people- especially those setting a fitness related goal- need to get better educated about the human body from the moment they enter into formal Education- the only physical thing they enter into this world with. I also feel most physician examinations- especially the first visit- are cursory and not thorough by any degree. I feel the person experiencing the lower grade injury and disability has a much better idea of their true symptoms and limitations than a general practitioner spending 5 minutes to gloss over the patient history and not even perform a hands-on, thorough evaluation. It is not how it should be and isn’t at all what I would hope for in an ideal medical community system but it is the most common reality of our current society- especially in the U.S. I feel the pendulum is shifting and the common “patient” has the opportunity to learn a wealth of information about their own body and health and should have the increased responsibility to do so. If for no other reasons than to lower health care costs, minimize drug seeking behavior and, in many cases, stop wasting the time of skilled professionals for low grade injuries that will likely heal best naturally using the human body’s own defense mechanisms.

I do appreciate your perspective and I mean no offense- just a healthy debate amongst Professionals and one that I feel should definitely be examined more closely in the higher echelons of our government. (For the record, countries like Australia do not have government funded worker’s compensation benefits for injured workers and their unemployment rate is less than 3%).

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction. You are absolutely correct in that sprains refer to ligaments. I was juggling several things when I responded to the OP, I brain cramped.

I’m not questioning your background in the subject. However, you’ll note that many of the theories I stated are in line with yours.

There is an important distinction, however. My posts were much more general - and for good reason. It is a risk to try and give exact medical diagnosis and specific medical advice over an internet forum.

The main difference between my post and yours is that mine pointed the compass in (to the best of my knowledge) the right direction. Your post attempts to give the exact gps coordinates. If you are correct, you become the hero for the day. But if you’re wrong, there is the chance you expose yourself legally.

I’m confident the OP isn’t the litigating sort. And I’m equally confident your intentions are in the right place. Be advised: things may not be so rosy in future encounters with other people online.

This is a respectful heads up, from one Strength and Conditioning Professional to another.

OP, FWIW, I sincerely feel it’s in your best interest to hedge your bets and see a medical professional first and foremost. As I and frmerritt noted, it most likely is not a grade 3 issue. Even if it is only grade 1, it’s best to know exactly where the injury is.

At the fundamental level, this is the difference between myself and the other poster. You can accuse me of being a nervous Nelly. However, I subscribe to the belief that another IN PERSON view of the situation (even if I am convinced I know what is going on) is ultimately in the client’s best interest. You only have one body. It’s up to you to decide whether or not it’s worth it to know EXACTLY what’s going on as opposed what is Most Likely going on.
[/quote]

Having worked closely alongside highly regarded Orthopaedic physicians for over 20 years and experienced many 1st and 2nd degree strains (none of which required significantly complicated medical intervention),it is my professional opinion that it is entirely unnecessary to schedule an appointment with a medical doctor for anything LESS serious than an injury (strain or “sprain”) in the 2nd degree unless you are pill shopping. This is precisely what I initially advised. Read up on the commonly taught and very GENERAL method of RICE used to treat all low grade sprains and strains. There is nothing liable regarding the advice I have given and I encourage you to continue to inquire from any and all professionals along with more reputable research online to best educate yourself regarding commonly seen musculoskeletal injuries and improved rehab outcomes.(And, once again, it is still my advice to see an Orthopedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain- which you can easily determine by reading up on the classification criteria online). Good luck![/quote]

I think we agree that the OP is most likely not suffering from grade 3 injury.

However, the fact is we cannot know for certain whether or not it’s grade 1 or grade 2.

My original response to the OP on the subject was to have it examined to determine exactly the severity.

Your original response on the subject was to RICE/use NSAIDs and then see someone if the OP feels the issue is greater than a grade 1 issue. I’ll take the liberty of quoting you here:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

As I stated to the OP in last night’s post, the fundamental difference between my suggestion and yours is that I strongly feel the OP should be examined in person first. You differ in that the OP should be examined AFTER doing what your treatment - and I quote here:

“See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.”

With due respect to the OP, I don’t believe he is qualified to make that determination.

Furthermore, neither you nor I (or anyone else) can tell from a few internet posts whether this is grade 1 or 2.

Despite the book knowledge and the experience working with orthos, I feel you are neglecting a key element in this matter: human nature.

It is human nature to want to get back in the game sooner rather than later. It is human nature to want to believe (unless one is a hypochondriac) that your injury is not as severe as it might be.

By following my suggestion to get examined first, the OP removes this element and increases the probability of a more expeditious healing time. If it is grade 1, then the OP has sacrificed what? An hour or two out of his day and the cost of a co-payment. This, I strongly believe, is a small investment on his long term health.

[/quote]

As trivial and juvenile as this difference of opinion might seem to the casual observer, I do find it to be an interesting debate. I continue to disagree with you for the primary reason that I feel people need to empower themselves with an increased knowledge of their own human body and not rely dependently on others to always tell them what to do. Like it or not, we now live in the age of the Internet- a very valuable resource and, admittedly, risky if you are one to believe everything you read or quickly jump to conclusions. I personally feel people- especially those setting a fitness related goal- need to get better educated about the human body from the moment they enter into formal Education- the only physical thing they enter into this world with. I also feel most physician examinations- especially the first visit- are cursory and not thorough by any degree. I feel the person experiencing the lower grade injury and disability has a much better idea of their true symptoms and limitations than a general practitioner spending 5 minutes to gloss over the patient history and not even perform a hands-on, thorough evaluation. It is not how it should be and isn’t at all what I would hope for in an ideal medical community system but it is the most common reality of our current society- especially in the U.S. I feel the pendulum is shifting and the common “patient” has the opportunity to learn a wealth of information about their own body and health and should have the increased responsibility to do so. If for no other reasons than to lower health care costs, minimize drug seeking behavior and, in many cases, stop wasting the time of skilled professionals for low grade injuries that will likely heal best naturally using the human body’s own defense mechanisms.

I do appreciate your perspective and I mean no offense- just a healthy debate amongst Professionals and one that I feel should definitely be examined more closely in the higher echelons of our government. (For the record, countries like Australia do not have government funded worker’s compensation benefits for injured workers and their unemployment rate is less than 3%).[/quote]

Thanks for the feedback. I can certainly see your stance in this matter.

For those who read my posts on this forum, one of the common threads is that I want to empower the individual with a level of knowledge so that he can be a more active participant if he decides to visit someone in person.

In an earlier post, I used the metaphor of “pointing the compass in the right direction.” Within the parameters of an online forum, I strongly believe this is best practice. In other words:

  1. Determine the issue to my best ability.

  2. Provide enough information so the OP has a better understanding of the matter. This also helps the OP research on his own.

As callous as this may sound, I certainly don’t have the time to spoon feed every nuance of what MAY be the case based on an internet post. In fact, this is a slippery slope.

I can tell you that this forum has been known, on occasion, to be a magnet for individuals who start a thread about a certain ailment, receives extensive help from a well-intentioned professional, and eventually makes that professional his de facto health provider. Eventually, you’ll end up with a patient that you are treating online. This is exceptionally dangerous.

Based on what the OP described, I determined it was most likely not a grade 3. There was - and is - no way of determining if he has grade 1 or 2 via an online forum. This is why I advised the OP to have it examined first and foremost. As I stated earlier, the OP will sacrifice an hour or two of his day and the cost of a co-payment. I believe this to be a fair investment since we are talking about his body and not some kitchen appliance that can be easily replaced.

Now anyone can say, “go see a doc” and leave it at that. What I did was arm the OP with a base of knowledge so he can research the matter on his own and, should he choose to be examined, be much more of an active participant. I prefer to teach a man to fish as opposed to giving him one every day.

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

[quote]56x11 wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
I searched and didn’t find anything…

Yesterday I was doing calf raises on a sort of donkey-type 45 degrees sled machine and felt my left calf sort of pop, like it ripped a bit. Of course the immediate pain was pretty bad, but right after it wasn’t like I was rolling on the floor or anything, and I felt it and nothing came off like a tendon …but it basically feels like that muscle just finished pressing 50 elephants all day and it’s tight and I can’t stretch it at all or it hurts like hell.[/quote]

It could be a strain (damage to the muscle), a sprain (damage to the tendon or ligament), or a combination of the two. The popping sensation is not good, my friend. In other words, don’t make light of your situation.

There are degrees of strains and sprains. Don’t bank on this, but it does not sound like a grade 3 (the worst-case scenario); it’s quite possibly a grade 1 or 2. Have it examined in person.

All the gym rats (not that I’m accusing you of being one) know about the gastrocs; some of the more enlightened gym rats know about the soleus. However, there are also two tibialis muscles, three peroneus muscles, two extensors, and two flexors. Alot going on down there. Based on how you injured yourself, it most likely involves muscles and/or connective tissue that plantar flex (but I cannot guarantee this as the dorsiflexors are involved in the eccentric). [/quote]

Sprains refer to ligaments and capsule- not tendon or muscle. There isn’t a ligament or capsule “felt in the calf”… aside from the interosseus membrane between the tibia and fibula. Most calf tears (strains) occur at or near the musculotendinous junction (about 1/3 up from heel) though some occur mid muscle belly. You would know a Grade II or III tear in the muscle or tendon because you would have great difficulty walking (Gr III is a complete rupture). Achilles tears (near the heel) ofton present as tendinitis (microtearing), tendinosis (degradation mid tendon and palpable “nodule”), or ruptures (definitely visible and permanent without surgery).

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction. You are absolutely correct in that sprains refer to ligaments. I was juggling several things when I responded to the OP, I brain cramped.

I’m not questioning your background in the subject. However, you’ll note that many of the theories I stated are in line with yours.

There is an important distinction, however. My posts were much more general - and for good reason. It is a risk to try and give exact medical diagnosis and specific medical advice over an internet forum.

The main difference between my post and yours is that mine pointed the compass in (to the best of my knowledge) the right direction. Your post attempts to give the exact gps coordinates. If you are correct, you become the hero for the day. But if you’re wrong, there is the chance you expose yourself legally.

I’m confident the OP isn’t the litigating sort. And I’m equally confident your intentions are in the right place. Be advised: things may not be so rosy in future encounters with other people online.

This is a respectful heads up, from one Strength and Conditioning Professional to another.

OP, FWIW, I sincerely feel it’s in your best interest to hedge your bets and see a medical professional first and foremost. As I and frmerritt noted, it most likely is not a grade 3 issue. Even if it is only grade 1, it’s best to know exactly where the injury is.

At the fundamental level, this is the difference between myself and the other poster. You can accuse me of being a nervous Nelly. However, I subscribe to the belief that another IN PERSON view of the situation (even if I am convinced I know what is going on) is ultimately in the client’s best interest. You only have one body. It’s up to you to decide whether or not it’s worth it to know EXACTLY what’s going on as opposed what is Most Likely going on.
[/quote]

Having worked closely alongside highly regarded Orthopaedic physicians for over 20 years and experienced many 1st and 2nd degree strains (none of which required significantly complicated medical intervention),it is my professional opinion that it is entirely unnecessary to schedule an appointment with a medical doctor for anything LESS serious than an injury (strain or “sprain”) in the 2nd degree unless you are pill shopping. This is precisely what I initially advised. Read up on the commonly taught and very GENERAL method of RICE used to treat all low grade sprains and strains. There is nothing liable regarding the advice I have given and I encourage you to continue to inquire from any and all professionals along with more reputable research online to best educate yourself regarding commonly seen musculoskeletal injuries and improved rehab outcomes.(And, once again, it is still my advice to see an Orthopedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain- which you can easily determine by reading up on the classification criteria online). Good luck![/quote]

I think we agree that the OP is most likely not suffering from grade 3 injury.

However, the fact is we cannot know for certain whether or not it’s grade 1 or grade 2.

My original response to the OP on the subject was to have it examined to determine exactly the severity.

Your original response on the subject was to RICE/use NSAIDs and then see someone if the OP feels the issue is greater than a grade 1 issue. I’ll take the liberty of quoting you here:

[quote]frmerritt wrote:

If pain, tightness and tenderness to palpation is constant and consistent, I recommend immediate regular icing (cold pack with compression) in elevation on mild stretch (dorsiflexion) 15 min, 3 to 4 times daily. An anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen or naproxen) for the first 2 to 3 days taken at a prescription level. Contrast heat and cold from the 3rd day on. Introduce light exercise for circulation (biking) then eccentric loading (also very light at first).

See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.[/quote]

As I stated to the OP in last night’s post, the fundamental difference between my suggestion and yours is that I strongly feel the OP should be examined in person first. You differ in that the OP should be examined AFTER doing what your treatment - and I quote here:

“See an Orthopaedic Medical Doctor if you feel it is more serious than a 1st degree strain.”

With due respect to the OP, I don’t believe he is qualified to make that determination.

Furthermore, neither you nor I (or anyone else) can tell from a few internet posts whether this is grade 1 or 2.

Despite the book knowledge and the experience working with orthos, I feel you are neglecting a key element in this matter: human nature.

It is human nature to want to get back in the game sooner rather than later. It is human nature to want to believe (unless one is a hypochondriac) that your injury is not as severe as it might be.

By following my suggestion to get examined first, the OP removes this element and increases the probability of a more expeditious healing time. If it is grade 1, then the OP has sacrificed what? An hour or two out of his day and the cost of a co-payment. This, I strongly believe, is a small investment on his long term health.

[/quote]

As trivial and juvenile as this difference of opinion might seem to the casual observer, I do find it to be an interesting debate. I continue to disagree with you for the primary reason that I feel people need to empower themselves with an increased knowledge of their own human body and not rely dependently on others to always tell them what to do. Like it or not, we now live in the age of the Internet- a very valuable resource and, admittedly, risky if you are one to believe everything you read or quickly jump to conclusions. I personally feel people- especially those setting a fitness related goal- need to get better educated about the human body from the moment they enter into formal Education- the only physical thing they enter into this world with. I also feel most physician examinations- especially the first visit- are cursory and not thorough by any degree. I feel the person experiencing the lower grade injury and disability has a much better idea of their true symptoms and limitations than a general practitioner spending 5 minutes to gloss over the patient history and not even perform a hands-on, thorough evaluation. It is not how it should be and isn’t at all what I would hope for in an ideal medical community system but it is the most common reality of our current society- especially in the U.S. I feel the pendulum is shifting and the common “patient” has the opportunity to learn a wealth of information about their own body and health and should have the increased responsibility to do so. If for no other reasons than to lower health care costs, minimize drug seeking behavior and, in many cases, stop wasting the time of skilled professionals for low grade injuries that will likely heal best naturally using the human body’s own defense mechanisms.

I do appreciate your perspective and I mean no offense- just a healthy debate amongst Professionals and one that I feel should definitely be examined more closely in the higher echelons of our government. (For the record, countries like Australia do not have government funded worker’s compensation benefits for injured workers and their unemployment rate is less than 3%).[/quote]

Thanks for the feedback. I can certainly see your stance in this matter.

For those who read my posts on this forum, one of the common threads is that I want to empower the individual with a level of knowledge so that he can be a more active participant if he decides to visit someone in person.

In an earlier post, I used the metaphor of “pointing the compass in the right direction.” Within the parameters of an online forum, I strongly believe this is best practice. In other words:

  1. Determine the issue to my best ability.

  2. Provide enough information so the OP has a better understanding of the matter. This also helps the OP research on his own.

As callous as this may sound, I certainly don’t have the time to spoon feed every nuance of what MAY be the case based on an internet post. In fact, this is a slippery slope.

I can tell you that this forum has been known, on occasion, to be a magnet for individuals who start a thread about a certain ailment, receives extensive help from a well-intentioned professional, and eventually makes that professional his de facto health provider. Eventually, you’ll end up with a patient that you are treating online. This is exceptionally dangerous.

Based on what the OP described, I determined it was most likely not a grade 3. There was - and is - no way of determining if he has grade 1 or 2 via an online forum. This is why I advised the OP to have it examined first and foremost. As I stated earlier, the OP will sacrifice an hour or two of his day and the cost of a co-payment. I believe this to be a fair investment since we are talking about his body and not some kitchen appliance that can be easily replaced.

Now anyone can say, “go see a doc” and leave it at that. What I did was arm the OP with a base of knowledge so he can research the matter on his own and, should he choose to be examined, be much more of an active participant. I prefer to teach a man to fish as opposed to giving him one every day.

[/quote]

I don’t consider my offering free advice that is commonly understood by anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of rehabilitation to be assuming the responsibility as their therapist or being “exceptionally dangerous”. But thanks for your advice Daddy-o. Please explain to me how you “empowered the individual with knowledge”? By telling him to immediately run to someone else for help?! And as far as “determining the issue to your best ability” and “providing enough information so the OP has a better understanding of the matter”- your post was definitely lacking (and blatantly incorrect) at both.

At worst, should it be a “Grade II” strain, there is no harm in following my advice and going straight to treatment as soon as possible, rather, it will most likely expedite healing and minimize scar tissue formation significantly. Other posts also recommended to wait a couple days- so why not make best use of that time and treat it conservatively?? Furthermore, in most cases of Grade II, the only difference an overly conservative physician would probably recommend is an immobilization walking boot for a short period, which is highly debatable to be of significant benefit with current evidence-based rehab protocol. Are you a therapist or a “certified” trainer, by the way?? What is your background, experience and expertise on this matter??? Do you have any actual rehab credential or professional expertise to be offering injury and rehab advice???

And how the hell do you see your advice of sending the OP to the doctor as “teaching a man to fish”??? I think most would agree that “empowering” and “teaching” would be directing one toward researching and learning about the ailment and coming to an informed decision as to the best direction and intervention on your own.

Wow, thanks for the advice both of you, it’s very considerate and of course helpful.

I can walk but just need to be careful not to step too far as that can hurt, but I notice only a very minor amount of welling and no bruising, so I think I’ll soon be walking completely normally (It happened on Tuesday and it’s Saturday today), I try dorsiflexion and the first two days I could only get my foot to be at a right angle to my leg…like it would be if you were standing, but can now bring it up farther.

But damn if remembering that feeling when it gave…like ripping a cooked steak with your fingers…isn’t the worst part!
I’m 40 and my calves are actually rather well developed and I did warm up thoroughly that day and the weight I was pushing was 225lbs so the idea of going back to calf raises is daunting.

I am 41 myself… very common for men ages 35 to 45 to experience calf and Achilles strains- much less elastin in our tissues as we get older so it really doesn’t take much force to create tearing- typically just a quick change in direction will do it (too quickly from eccentric to concentric). I have experienced a Grade II calf strain on the right (mid muscle belly) just cutting lightly while playing basketball and a significant Achilles tendinosis on the left (mid tendon degradation) just from occasional jogging on concrete and jumping lightly in Boot Camp. The calf strain took about 10-14 days to calm down, the Achilles tendinosis between 4 to 6 months to return to 90% (most elect for surgery as it is often recommended that the scar tissue within the Achilles be “cleaned out” and new tendon grafted in it’s place). Personally, I almost always opt for rehab first and would only consider surgery for my injuries when I have exhausted all other approaches for at least 6 weeks and am functionally limited beyond a tolerable and predictable level…