T Nation

Calcium Supps for Lactose Intolerance?

I’m lactose intolerant and as such have pretty much cut out dairy produce from my diet. My main concern is that dairy is one of the main sources of calcium in our diet, and that calcium is essential for bone health and to some degree muscle health, nerve transmission and blood clotting.

Would you recommend that someone like me who eats no dairy take some form of calcium supplement? If so, would there be potential benefits transferring over into my performance (I sprint and lift weights) as opposed to just future health benefits with bone density?

[quote]Hamster of DOOM wrote:
I’m lactose intolerant and as such have pretty much cut out dairy produce from my diet. My main concern is that dairy is one of the main sources of calcium in our diet, and that calcium is essential for bone health and to some degree muscle health, nerve transmission and blood clotting.

Would you recommend that someone like me who eats no dairy take some form of calcium supplement? If so, would there be potential benefits transferring over into my performance (I sprint and lift weights) as opposed to just future health benefits with bone density?

[/quote]
Get yoru calcium from green leafy veggies. This is one of the best most bioavailable sources.

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:

[quote]Hamster of DOOM wrote:
I’m lactose intolerant and as such have pretty much cut out dairy produce from my diet. My main concern is that dairy is one of the main sources of calcium in our diet, and that calcium is essential for bone health and to some degree muscle health, nerve transmission and blood clotting.

Would you recommend that someone like me who eats no dairy take some form of calcium supplement? If so, would there be potential benefits transferring over into my performance (I sprint and lift weights) as opposed to just future health benefits with bone density?

[/quote]
Get yoru calcium from green leafy veggies. This is one of the best most bioavailable sources.[/quote]

This is good advice.
Also when you eat chicken legs, suck out the marrow. I think it’s really tasty so that’s a plus also.

have you tried any whey isolates? they should be lactose-free

Also, try vitamin D-3. D truly helps the body absorb and utilize calcium in your diet. I take 4-5 caps per day. I’ve noticed I’m cutting my nails every 5 days on this regimen, so I know it’s working. And I take NO calcium supps, nor do I drink milk (though I do eat a yogurt every day and an occasional bowl of ice cream).

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
Also, try vitamin D-3. D truly helps the body absorb and utilize calcium in your diet. I take 4-5 caps per day. I’ve noticed I’m cutting my nails every 5 days on this regimen, so I know it’s working. And I take NO calcium supps, nor do I drink milk (though I do eat a yogurt every day and an occasional bowl of ice cream). [/quote]
Yeah, ^THIS^ and vitamin K2 are the two key regulators of proper calcium metabolism (including healthy osteoblast production and healthy uptake of other key components of STRONG bone tissue It also helps keep CONNECTIVE TISSUE AND MUSCLE TISSUE free from calcification. <–I’d suspect most ppl that have spent some time under the iron would greatly benefit from K2)).

[quote]Bone mineralization

Three vitamin-K dependent proteins have been isolated in bone: osteocalcin, matrix Gla protein (MGP), and protein S. Osteocalcin (also called bone Gla protein) is a protein synthesized by osteoblasts (bone-forming cells). The synthesis of osteocalcin by osteoblasts is regulated by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3 or calcitriol. The mineral-binding capacity of osteocalcin requires vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation of three glutamic acid residues. The function of osteocalcin is unclear but is thought to be related to bone mineralization. MGP has been found in bone, cartilage, and soft tissue, including blood vessels. The results of animal studies suggest MGP prevents the calcification of soft tissue and cartilage, while facilitating normal bone growth and development. The vitamin K-dependent anticoagulant protein S is also synthesized by osteoblasts, but its role in bone metabolism is unclear. Children with inherited protein S deficiency suffer complications related to increased blood clotting as well as decreased bone density (7, 10, 11).

Cell growth

Gas6 is a vitamin K-dependent protein that was identified in 1993. It has been found throughout the nervous system, as well in the heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, and cartilage. Although the exact mechanism of its action has not been determined, Gas6 appears to be a cellular growth regulation factor with cell-signaling activities. Gas6 appears to be important in diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and protection against apoptosis (6). It may also play important roles in the developing and aging nervous system (12, 13). Further, Gas6 appears to regulate platelet signaling and vascular homeostasis (14).[/quote]