T Nation

Calcium: Helpful or Dangerous?

I was wondering if anyone had researched the effects of calcium in relation to cancer. I’ve found contradictory answers.

In an issue of Men’s Health “they” state: “You may be able to lower your prostate-cancer risk by limiting your calcium intake and eating more fruit. Harvard researchers studied 47,000 men and found that those who consumed 2,000 mg of calcium a day were almost twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those who consumed 1,000 mg (about three glasses of milk).”

Other searches on google turned up results in favor of calcium by various sources but gave no clear limit. Does anyone know of solid research on calcium and its effects?

Thanks.

[quote]P1 wrote:
I was wondering if anyone had researched the effects of calcium in relation to cancer. I’ve found contradictory answers.

In an issue of Men’s Health “they” state: “You may be able to lower your prostate-cancer risk by limiting your calcium intake and eating more fruit. Harvard researchers studied 47,000 men and found that those who consumed 2,000 mg of calcium a day were almost twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those who consumed 1,000 mg (about three glasses of milk).”

Other searches on google turned up results in favor of calcium by various sources but gave no clear limit. Does anyone know of solid research on calcium and its effects?

Thanks.[/quote]

You haven’t really provided any meaningful information concerning the study at hand.

What were the sources of calcium? If there even is an issue, was it the calcium or the things associated with the calcium consumption? How were people chosen for inclusion in the study? Is this an aggregate “study of studies” as opposed to a “real” study?

Who can say at this point.

[quote]vroom wrote:
P1 wrote:
I was wondering if anyone had researched the effects of calcium in relation to cancer. I’ve found contradictory answers.

In an issue of Men’s Health “they” state: “You may be able to lower your prostate-cancer risk by limiting your calcium intake and eating more fruit. Harvard researchers studied 47,000 men and found that those who consumed 2,000 mg of calcium a day were almost twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those who consumed 1,000 mg (about three glasses of milk).”

Other searches on google turned up results in favor of calcium by various sources but gave no clear limit. Does anyone know of solid research on calcium and its effects?

Thanks.

You haven’t really provided any meaningful information concerning the study at hand.

What were the sources of calcium? If there even is an issue, was it the calcium or the things associated with the calcium consumption? How were people chosen for inclusion in the study? Is this an aggregate “study of studies” as opposed to a “real” study?

Who can say at this point.[/quote]

Along with that, this could be coincidental. You don’t take one study and use that as proof. If similar results continue to build up over several studies pointing to the same cause for the results, then you can make definitive statements.

You can pretty much find a study done somewhere that “proves” almost anything you want it to prove. Scientists can have biases also.

The point of my reference was not to prove anything but to show what I’ve found and see peoples opinions on it and also see if anyone else knows of any more solid evidence.

[quote]P1 wrote:
The point of my reference was not to prove anything but to show what I’ve found and see peoples opinions on it and also see if anyone else knows of any more solid evidence.[/quote]

That’s fine. My point was to tell you that one study doesn’t raise any alarms at all, especially when there is much important information left out of their findings. You could spend the next 50 years grabbing random studies that alone might hint at this or that.

Unless there are SEVERAL studies showing the same or similar effects, I wouldn’t run around basing how I live my life on individual studies. It is pointless.

The theory goes, that by supplementing with more calcium, it can induce a vitamin D deficiency, and vitamin D has a protective effect against prostate cancer. As long as you get lots of sun I wouldn’t worry about your calcium intake unless it’s excessive.