T Nation

Butter Causes an Insulin Response?


#1

I have been reading several studies today that show that adding butter to carbs, while it lowers the GI, does so largely by increasing the insulin secretion in response to the mixed meal. (the same for protein by the way).

Here is one: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8325201

This is troubling because it would mean that adding fat or protein to a moderate carb meal could cause a progression of insulin resistance as more insulin is secreted in response. Good blood sugars yes, but progression toward insulin resistance.

Does anyone out there have some knowledge that debunks this or at least ameliorates my concern?


#2

Try adding vinegar. Again, this is a large amount of butter plus about 50 grams of white bread in the first study, but while the butter lowers peak blood sugar it does so partly by stimulating insulin, though calorie per calorie not as much as more carbs would it appears.


#3

I have read that there are specific forms of CLA that are linked to increase type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk. Could be related to the CLA in the butter?


#4

Stuff like this is not worth even thinking about.


#5

This is important if you are in insulin resistant person who uses lower carb higher fat diets in an attempt to improve insulin sensitivity. Butter may lower the peak blood sugar after a meal, but if it stimulates insulin it is not going to improve your insulin sensitivity to just load up on butterfat, because your cells will still be seeing a lot of post meal insulin.

If you have good insulin sensitivity then butter can help prevent spikes that damage cells or destroy pancreatic beta cells and lead to insulin dependence.

If you are insulin resistant though the goal is to protect the pancreas from spikes, and then also to raise insulin sensitivity over time. Since being overweight and under active is the main way to achieve that, then butter is probably a lot better than carbs, but there may be a good reason to find non-insulin stimulating ways of reducing blood sugar spikes for at least a period of time tom improve sensitivity. Some of those are adding acid like vinegar to a meal, adding pectin and cellulose fiber, eating “some” carbs (lower than 100 grams reduces insulin sensitivity). The best is to move one’s ass after eating, or before eating or at least some every day. Intense work improves sensitivity for several hours.


#6

[quote]mertdawg wrote:
I have been reading several studies today that show that adding butter to carbs, while it lowers the GI, does so largely by increasing the insulin secretion in response to the mixed meal. (the same for protein by the way).

This is troubling because it would mean that adding fat or protein to a moderate carb meal could cause a progression of insulin resistance as more insulin is secreted in response. Good blood sugars yes, but progression toward insulin resistance.

Does anyone out there have some knowledge that debunks this or at least ameliorates my concern?[/quote]

You’re talking about non-diabetic individuals, correct?

These data indicate that butter does not significantly affect the quantitative glucose and insulin response.

I recall reading that insulin response can be affected by, not just macronutrients, but also sight and smell of food. Maybe the buttery potato looked more delicious and that can (partly) explain the difference. Then again, that could be a complete BS supposition. Probably more likely is that the researchers were idiots or worse, they had an agenda.


#7

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
insulin response can be affected by, not just macronutrients, but also…[/quote]
Puff the magic dragon http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23684393


#8

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:

[quote]mertdawg wrote:
I have been reading several studies today that show that adding butter to carbs, while it lowers the GI, does so largely by increasing the insulin secretion in response to the mixed meal. (the same for protein by the way).

This is troubling because it would mean that adding fat or protein to a moderate carb meal could cause a progression of insulin resistance as more insulin is secreted in response. Good blood sugars yes, but progression toward insulin resistance.

Does anyone out there have some knowledge that debunks this or at least ameliorates my concern?[/quote]

You’re talking about non-diabetic individuals, correct?

These data indicate that butter does not significantly affect the quantitative glucose and insulin response.

I recall reading that insulin response can be affected by, not just macronutrients, but also sight and smell of food. Maybe the buttery potato looked more delicious and that can (partly) explain the difference. Then again, that could be a complete BS supposition. Probably more likely is that the researchers were idiots or worse, they had an agenda.[/quote]

The first source is saying that butter delays the blood sugar and insulin curves, but does not otherwise alter them. That is important. I do believe there is an agenda against saturated and animals fats. It also states that MUFA plant and PUFA plant without much saturated fat (olive and corn) reduce the amount of insulin and the blood sugar curve, so while butter does not raise the insulin used to handle carbs, nor raise the spike (important because some out there in modern medicine claim that it reduces insulin sensitivity after a meal which it couldn’t given those 2 facts), relative to Olive and Corn combined with carbs it does “raise” the insulin response and blood sugar excursion. Its odd because butter is largely Oleic. And there is evidence that myristic I think reduces insulin sensitivity but oleic increases it, so for butter they balance out. I’ve read that assertion in other places as well.

The second says that Lard, safflower and corn oil do not increase the insulin response which “seems to be unique to butter”