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Bulgarian Power Burst Training


#1

Hi guys,

Recently I heard of a system bearing the pompous name "Bulgarian Power Burst Training". Now, I'm from Bulgaria but nobody here seems to be acquainted with this program. So, I'm discombobulated - how can a system arrogate to be Bulgarian and still nobody in Bulgaria knows of it. Can some of you apprise me with the details of the system? What does it look like? Is it good for getting stronger in the three powerlifts? I currently bench press 145kg (320 pounds) and I would wish to augment that to 340 -350. I weigh 200 pounds (90kg). I don't seek hypertrophy - just relative strength. This is the apposite time to say that I'm not a professional athlete and train after work just to keep in shape.

Also, why is it that I burn out on Westside so quickly? Even though I rotate ME exercises as prescribed I end up weak on the third or fourth week at the most. It's the same thing with traditional Bulgarian weightlifting training - this one has you doing several maximum efforts per day!!! That's why I currently use Russian cycles high in volume, lower in intensity. Have you got any suggestions for reaching my goal?

Thanks to everyone who takes the time to answer. All the best with your training.

Martin


#2

Martin,

i bought the original Bulgarian Burst manual when it came out in the early 90's....you have to workout 3 times a day, which is not do-able for most people's time schedules. unless you don't have any daily committments, i would suggest it...


#3

I, too, spent forty dollars (back in the day!) for the all paper product. I think I still have it. It's funny but if you go to my original One Lift a Day program, you will find the same basic ideas (by the way... that wasn't meant like "I invented it" or anything...just that the information was old).

45 minute workouts
Fairly long rests, but the author got around this by doing supersets...

Ah, I didn't like it.

The author went to Bulgaria and adapted the O lifting to bodybuilding...a bad marriage. He said that half the lifters diet was fat, and then recommended more carbs...that kind of thing. I personally think most of the great "East European" secrets that came out of the early 1990's were from guys selling stuff. It's funny to hear a guy like Yuri Sedyk say: "I never heard of him" when you read to him a quote from somebody that "worked" with Yuri.

Of course, I do that, too...


#4

Are you going to failure on everything including assistance exercises? This will surely cause you to burn out.

Also check what you are doing outside the gym too much work, partying or stress might hinder your recuperation.


#5

Don't max every week, use 2 exercises per mini cycle, on the first week work up to a 1RM then back off to 90% and do 3 singles, then on the second week of the same exercise deload by working up to a 3RM. On the first week the only assistance work should be lats and/or upper back, on the second week do regular assistance work, also, if you start feeling beat up skip DE day...


#6

You might find this interesting. An repost of an old post by Christian Thibaudeau
about (real) Bulgarian loading secrets for strength:

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=588042


#7

Thanks, Slotan. Very informative article. And it has quite a lot of truth in it. What you refer to as a daily max is the maximum amount of weight that may be overcome without a strong will effort. Of course that's too obscure and personal. They say the feel for it comes with experience. But then again going for a heavy weight so often can be quite demanding. Do you happen to have any more strength articles of this sort? What do you think of Westside?