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Building Type IIa Muscle Fibers for Mass

I believe it is the type IIb muscle fibers that are the fast twitch and have to largest capacity for mass. These fibers are generally built with heavy weight such as the 1-8 rep range and with heavy compound lifts.

Type IIa muscle fibers are the fast twitch muscle fibers that are built more from the 8-12 rep range and respond well to isolation exersises. they have a less capacity for hypertrophy.

So if I was an ectomorph and not on steroids would I want to be training the type IIb fibers mainly or the type IIa fibers?

Or if I was an ectomorph on steroids would I want to be training the type IIb fibers or the type IIa fibers primarily?

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Lift weights. Your body will make that decision for you.


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Regardless of how you train, your type IIx fibers will transition to IIa. The IIx fibers are the default fiber type and pretty useless in the grand scheme of things because of how hard they are to recruit.

p90x brah

I’ll never understand how some people get so misguided…

THIS IS WHAT MATTERS!

Screw the eating to gain, training hard and intelligently, this is where we are all missing out!

Math Analogy!

Hey guys I understand that X=2.
So X+4=6.

…but I heard about these imaginary number things, so what if X is i?
All I know is i^2=1?
So obvi, square root of 1 is 1 right??
So, X (which is really i), plus 4, is 5!

But, wait what if X is really a Euclidean Vector? I don’t know the parallelogram law of addition, hell I can’t even figure out the direction of displacement between X and 4…
Fuck!

Stick to basic Algebra, brah.

[quote]kingbeef323 wrote:
I’ll never understand how some people get so misguided…[/quote]

King, your arm is insane! You’ve been growing!

[quote]kingbeef323 wrote:
I’ll never understand how some people get so misguided…[/quote]

Waterbury articles

[quote]iVoodoo wrote:
Math Analogy!

Hey guys I understand that X=2.
So X+4=6.

…but I heard about these imaginary number things, so what if X is i?
All I know is i^2=1?
So obvi, square root of 1 is 1 right??
So, X (which is really i), plus 4, is 5!

But, wait what if X is really a Euclidean Vector? I don’t know the parallelogram law of addition, hell I can’t even figure out the direction of displacement between X and 4…
Fuck!

Stick to basic Algebra, brah.
[/quote]

BTW i^2 = -1 :smiley:

So I think that means high reps for toning…

Not s single microbiology brah ITT

[quote]roon12 wrote:

[quote]iVoodoo wrote:
Math Analogy!

Hey guys I understand that X=2.
So X+4=6.

…but I heard about these imaginary number things, so what if X is i?
All I know is i^2=1?
So obvi, square root of 1 is 1 right??
So, X (which is really i), plus 4, is 5!

But, wait what if X is really a Euclidean Vector? I don’t know the parallelogram law of addition, hell I can’t even figure out the direction of displacement between X and 4…
Fuck!

Stick to basic Algebra, brah.
[/quote]

BTW i^2 = -1 :smiley:

So I think that means high reps for toning…
[/quote]
Haha!

[quote]iVoodoo wrote:
Math Analogy!

Hey guys I understand that X=2.
So X+4=6.

…but I heard about these imaginary number things, so what if X is i?
All I know is i^2=1?
So obvi, square root of 1 is 1 right??
So, X (which is really i), plus 4, is 5!

But, wait what if X is really a Euclidean Vector? I don’t know the parallelogram law of addition, hell I can’t even figure out the direction of displacement between X and 4…
Fuck!

Stick to basic Algebra, brah.
[/quote]

Well, I can run a mile in like 9 minutes. But that’s when I’m out of shape. So like, 7 minutes when I’m in shape. I’m running about 10 miles an hour. I would whack 80 in half, and that’s 40.

So our equation will basically look something like this:

20,000=500e^(ln8/5)(t), solve for t

We can divide both sides by 500, giving us

40=e^(ln8/5)(t)

Which leads us to

ln40=lne^(ln8/5)(t)

We can then divide both sides by ln(8/5)

7.8586=t

So 58 minutes.

[quote]howie424 wrote:

[quote]iVoodoo wrote:
Math Analogy!

Hey guys I understand that X=2.
So X+4=6.

…but I heard about these imaginary number things, so what if X is i?
All I know is i^2=1?
So obvi, square root of 1 is 1 right??
So, X (which is really i), plus 4, is 5!

But, wait what if X is really a Euclidean Vector? I don’t know the parallelogram law of addition, hell I can’t even figure out the direction of displacement between X and 4…
Fuck!

Stick to basic Algebra, brah.
[/quote]

Well, I can run a mile in like 9 minutes. But that’s when I’m out of shape. So like, 7 minutes when I’m in shape. I’m running about 10 miles an hour. I would whack 80 in half, and that’s 40.

So our equation will basically look something like this:

20,000=500e^(ln8/5)(t), solve for t

We can divide both sides by 500, giving us

40=e^(ln8/5)(t)

Which leads us to

ln40=lne^(ln8/5)(t)

We can then divide both sides by ln(8/5)

7.8586=t

So 58 minutes.
[/quote]

Well if you take the derivative you can see the instantaneous rate of change at a given time. That’s the key for the progression model.

LOGARITHMIC LIFTING BITCHES!

[quote]Decinator wrote:
Not s single microbiology brah ITT[/quote]

True, but any talk of that (outside of a graduate-degree program) is almost certainly majoring-in-the-minors…

[quote]VikingsAD28 wrote:
Lift weights. Your body will make that decision for you.[/quote]

GREAT way to put it. Anaerobic training, heavy weights, sprinting, explosive-type movements etc will all target those fast-twitch fibers and even force an adaptive response. But what the other posters are getting at is that no level of discussion will ever substitute for just doing the damn thing, and regularly at that.