T Nation

Building Strength in the Squat and More

Hey!

So a couple of 16 year old boys on my volleyball team are gonna start lifting this summer. I was thinking of letting them squat Mon, wed, fri 3x5 or 5x5, then probably doing pulls 1-2 times a week(heavy pulls/explosive pulls) and some box jumps. Does anybody have experience with coaching new beginners?

Thanks :wink:

Bump

Why box jumps? Why not regular jumps?

[quote]kollib wrote:
So a couple of 16 year old boys on my volleyball team are gonna start lifting this summer. I was thinking of letting them squat Mon, wed, fri 3x5 or 5x5, then probably doing pulls 1-2 times a week(heavy pulls/explosive pulls) and some box jumps. Does anybody have experience with coaching new beginners?[/quote]
I don’t jump young athletes right into free weights. We build structural stability, coordination, strength, and anatomical adaptation with bodyweight exercises first.

Three days a week
Squat 2x15 (No weight, keep both feet flat on the floor.)
Push-up 2x15 (On your toes, go until the chest almost touches the floor.)
Lunge 2x15 (Alternate legs, 1 rep left/1 rep right.)
Neutral-grip pull-up 2x15 (assisted if necessary. Could be substituted with inverted rows.)
Plank 2x15-count (Hold the top part of a push-up, on the toes, arms straight, keep the whole body straight. Count to 15.)
Burpee/squat thrust 2x15

Once everyone can finish that without hitting failure on any exercise, I’d probably progress your guys to something super-basic like Starting Strength or Bill Starr’s original Big Three program (from “The Strongest Shall Survive”).

Dan John’s Southwood program would be another good option to consider:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]kollib wrote:
So a couple of 16 year old boys on my volleyball team are gonna start lifting this summer. I was thinking of letting them squat Mon, wed, fri 3x5 or 5x5, then probably doing pulls 1-2 times a week(heavy pulls/explosive pulls) and some box jumps. Does anybody have experience with coaching new beginners?[/quote]
I don’t jump young athletes right into free weights. We build structural stability, coordination, strength, and anatomical adaptation with bodyweight exercises first.

Three days a week
Squat 2x15 (No weight, keep both feet flat on the floor.)
Push-up 2x15 (On your toes, go until the chest almost touches the floor.)
Lunge 2x15 (Alternate legs, 1 rep left/1 rep right.)
Neutral-grip pull-up 2x15 (assisted if necessary. Could be substituted with inverted rows.)
Plank 2x15-count (Hold the top part of a push-up, on the toes, arms straight, keep the whole body straight. Count to 15.)
Burpee/squat thrust 2x15

Once everyone can finish that without hitting failure on any exercise, I’d probably progress your guys to something super-basic like Starting Strength or Bill Starr’s original Big Three program (from “The Strongest Shall Survive”).

Dan John’s Southwood program would be another good option to consider:


[/quote]

Thanks for the reply :wink: