T Nation

Building Mass, Running Cross Country


#1

Hello,
I am a Cross Country runner who's looking to bulk up a little and gain 5 to 10 pounds of lean mass. I am currently recovery from an injury so I do a lot of swimming to make up for my running. I've been lifting 4 times a week and change up my workouts every 3 weeks.

This set of workouts currently are mostly medium-heavy reverse pyramid workouts. I swim around 4 miles a day, run 3, and bike about 14 to 20. I was wondering what foods I should eat to gain more mass without to much of the negative effects from all that cardio.


#2

Challanging indeed!
I’m not going to get into specific food choices. With that amount of work you are going to need a lot of calories. I suggest you begin at 20 calories per pound of bodyweight and proceed from there. (my guess is you will require more) I believe with that level of endurance work you can push the percentage of carbohydrate to 50% of total calories. Your protein should be at least 1 gram per pound (many would suggest up to 2, and they may be correct). Do not be foolish and avoid red meat, it should be a daily staple in your diet. Supplements should represent no more than 25% of your total calorie intake.


#3

I think your question will do better in the conditioning forum. They should have loads of info about how to make progress while doing all of that cardio.

GOOD LUCK!


#4

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
Challanging indeed!
I’m not going to get into specific food choices. With that amount of work you are going to need a lot of calories. I suggest you begin at 20 calories per pound of bodyweight and proceed from there. (my guess is you will require more) I believe with that level of endurance work you can push the percentage of carbohydrate to 50% of total calories. Your protein should be at least 1 gram per pound (many would suggest up to 2, and they may be correct). Do not be foolish and avoid red meat, it should be a daily staple in your diet. Supplements should represent no more than 25% of your total calorie intake. [/quote]

You do this a lot…give ultra-specific advice to people who you know very little about.

Really? 50% carbs? Based on what? Why not 60?

This guy is running CROSS COUNTRY and SWIMMING. How many big cross country guys have you seen lately?

Were they swimming?

I am all for giving good advice, but let’s be real here…you don’t know enough about this guy.


#5

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
Challanging indeed!
I’m not going to get into specific food choices. With that amount of work you are going to need a lot of calories. I suggest you begin at 20 calories per pound of bodyweight and proceed from there. (my guess is you will require more) I believe with that level of endurance work you can push the percentage of carbohydrate to 50% of total calories. Your protein should be at least 1 gram per pound (many would suggest up to 2, and they may be correct). Do not be foolish and avoid red meat, it should be a daily staple in your diet. Supplements should represent no more than 25% of your total calorie intake. [/quote]

You do this a lot…give ultra-specific advice to people who you know very little about.

Really? 50% carbs? Based on what? Why not 60?

This guy is running CROSS COUNTRY and SWIMMING. How many big cross country guys have you seen lately?

Were they swimming?

I am all for giving good advice, but let’s be real here…you don’t know enough about this guy.[/quote]

The situation as presented provides more than adequate information to provide specific ‘starting points’, and I never implied that they are more than that. It is common; perhaps routine that endurance athletes comsume a higher percentage of calories from carbohydrates (and yes he may need to eventually push it up to 60%).

If he had asked if people think it is possible to add muscle while maintaining that level of conditioning work, my answer would have been different. Although you and I agree about more than we disagree(I don’t like zercher stuff either…LOL); our styles are very different. What you frequently call a limit, I’d call a target or short term goal. We are all different, but we aren’t that different.

The advice I provide has proven to be effective over and over again, countless times. Ultimately the goal is for the individual to ‘become intimate with themselves’ and take ownership of the program. I stand behind my suggestions. Nothing radical in my advice to the OP, just basic ‘starting line’ stuff.


#6

[quote]dscasciano wrote:
I swim around 4 miles a day, run 3, and bike about 14 to 20[/quote]

you swim 4 miles, run 3 and bike up to 20 miles a day every day?

no way you’re putting on 10lbs of muscle doing all that lol


#7

dont call youself a cross county runner… your injured, not even running, swimming alot and doing a bit of biking, and your goal is to bulk up?

not a typical x-country trining program at all…

call yourself a guy thats doing a bit of everything to stay in average shape…


#8

[quote]spk wrote:
dont call youself a cross county runner… your injured, not even running, swimming alot and doing a bit of biking, and your goal is to bulk up?

[/quote]

By that logic, take someone who plays for the NFL. He gets injured in a play. He’s instantly no longer a football player and can’t honestly tell someone that he’s a football player again until he’s recovered and playing?