T Nation

Building a Log Bar

I have some trees to cut down this winter. I want a log bar. I am thinking of turning one of said trees into a log bar. Anybody tried it? Got any tips?

So far, I’ve decided that it’s going to be fairly short, around five feet, with loading pins on the ends. I would assume it needs to be at least 10" in diameter to give the handles a good mount.

Any ideas on the best way to mount the handles? The loading pins? Should I let the log age a bit? or paint it while it’s green?

Any suggestions are much appreciated.

EDIT: Just had a capital idea - fat handles!

If you scroll down a little, there’s direction for a wooden log.

http://www.ontariostrongman.ca/Resources/training/basic_primer.html#implements

Thanks. Good info in that link.

There are some things I’m going to do differently, though. I’m going to cut the log to four feet instead of five, and I’m going to balance the log from the center point. It’s gonna be plate loaded, so I don’t want the plates at unequal distances from the center. I’m also going to use 1.5" pipe for the handles.

Now I wanna go fire up the chainsaw…

http://www.slatershardware.com/Truelogs.html you can also get ready made ends and handles through Slater Stones.

Those are damn nice logs right there. Gives me some ideas on how to cut the handle wells. Thanks.

Got the logs cut. Managed to get three out of the trunk, but one of them may not be usable. Also got the ends coated to prevent checking (not shown in photo).

Finishing up the truing jig today. Hopefully tomorrow I’ll have some pics of the jig plus before, during and after pics of the logs.


hmmph. forgot to post the pic.


Truing jig installed on log.

Runners on the saw

After truing. It’s still rough, but it’s a consistent 10" diameter. I also haven’t cut it to 4’ yet. It weighs 190lbs as is. After it dries for a couple of months, I’ll cut it to length and smooth it out with a sander. In the meantime, I need to build a jig to cut the handle-well bevels, the handle holes, and the holes for the weight pins.

As I guessed, the smallest log doesn’t quite make the cut. I’m going to mill it into 4x4s and use it to make my new flat bench.


The ends look a little wonky because I couldn’t cut all the way to the end. I just didn’t want to take the time to make the modification to the jig because I was anxious to see if it was going to work (and how much of a pain in the ass it was going to be).

I have about $35 invested in this so far, and about 8 hours of work. That includes building the jigs, making corrections, trips to Lowe’s and everything

PS: If you’re wondering why I posted the picture again (I’m sure it’s killing you), it’s because this started as a double post.

Interesting stuff and nice work. Appreciate the updates, definitely be watching for more progression.

Damn nice work thus far

Thanks, fellas. The next update should be just after Christmas. The log should be ‘surface dry’ by then, so I’ll be able to sand it.

I found some interesting info dealing with logs. They shrink as the moisture content drops from 28% to 19%. The type of wood I’m dealing with (Black Gum or Tupelo) typically holds about 100% when green, which means the log weighs twice as much now as it would when it’s bone dry. As long as the static moisture content is below 28%, it won’t mold or rot. What that means to me is that once my log gets down to ~110lbs, I need to seal it so that it’s as heavy as possible without the possibility of rotting underneath the finish. Then, if I trim it to five feet, it’ll weigh about 100lbs or 80lbs if I trim it to four feet.

I have a Big Idea for sanding that’s going to be interesting if it works. That’ll have to be a video for sure. Stay tuned!

I hope you don’t mind me hijacking too much…

This thread is making consider building a log as well. I’d probably build a metal one. The two things I didn’t like about the log I was training with previously was that the handles weren’t knurled and the cutout sections weren’t smoothed so it would occasionally cut into my wrists.

  • Does anybody know if you can buy pre-knurled metal rods anywhere?
  • What could I pad those cutouts with? I think I’ve seen the hardware store selling strips of rubber molding that can line the metal.
  • Do most plates have a 2" inner diameter?

[quote]machiajelly wrote:

  • Does anybody know if you can buy pre-knurled metal rods anywhere?
  • Do most plates have a 2" inner diameter?[/quote]

Just buy a suitable barbell at a yard sale and cut it up. Perfect and cheap. You can also use the sleeves as your loading pins

[quote]- What could I pad those cutouts with? I think I’ve seen the hardware store selling strips of rubber molding that can line the metal.

Blank post?

Let’s try this again…

[quote]machiajelly wrote:

  • Does anybody know if you can buy pre-knurled metal rods anywhere?
  • Do most plates have a 2" inner diameter?[/quote]

Just buy a barbell at a yard sale. Use the end sleeves on your log bar, and cut whatever sections you need for your handles

click on ‘edge trim’ at the top

Oh, awesome, good call. Thanks.

Thats lookin good! Whats the total time from cutting to having a finished workable log to lift (in your estimation)?

Are you making backups in the event of your main log cracking or is that not likely?