T Nation

Brown Rice vs. White Rice


#1

I everyone, I went to www.glycemicindex.com where they have a glycemic index calculator. If you typein brown rice [canadian], it gives a GI of 66. If you type in white rice [canadian,] it gives a GI of 55.

Keeping in mind that brown rice tastes like shit, why can't I eat white rice?

Am i missing something?

Thanks,

brainfreez


#2

I've always heard brown rice was a lot healthier. More enzymes, nutrients, and what not.


#3

look it up on the insulin inex too.


#4

Brown rice tastes fine if you actually buy real brown rice. The shit they generally sell in the markets kind of looks like white rice that they soaked in mud for a while to make it kind of pale brown.

I think the brown rice you're talking about is a long grain. If you can find a medium or short grain brown rice they generally taste better. Of course it isn't going to be as good as Arobrio rice or good Japanese sushi rice.

In which case you might as well say fuck the GI Index, make some risotto or slap a piece of tuna on the white rice and call it a day.

By the way, if you can find it, black rice is really good. It isn't like that black and brown wild rice--it is jet black, short or medium grain rice. You can find it at Asian markets for cheap or pay a shitload at a gourmet white people grocery store. It tastes really nutty. I've got no clue what the its GI is.


#5

Yep, the bran layer is removed to make white rice, while just the husk is removed for brown. So brown is sort of partially whole grain, whereas white is processed. Macro-nutrient profiles are similar I believe, but the bran layer in brown has the micronutrients in it.


#6

Brown rice is healthier, because it's nutritionally intact and it does have more fiber. But it's not a low GI food.

Long grain rice is lower GI than short grain. So long grain brown rice is a fair bit better than white sticky rice (like the kind in sushi), both nutritionally and as far as GI goes.

Throw a little wild rice into your brown and it's even better tasting and healthier.