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Brian Shaw @ 2012 WSM

During the WSM finals telecast, Phil Pfister alluded to Brian Shaw’s possible biceps injury as a reason for his sub-par performance. But I never heard anyone â?? including Shaw â?? confirm it. Was that the case? If so, he probably needs to back off on training a bit. Same goes for Derek Poundstone.

I just wish Derek Poundstone would win WSM for once. I mean he’s won everything else at least one time, but for some reason the WSM just eludes him.

Shaw tore his bicep and had surgery earlier in the year. Don’t think it was a matter of backing off, he just wasn’t back up to full strength yet.

He has nerve damage in his hand/arm as a result of the surgery or rushing the comeback, he has talked about it on twitter.

If only Shaw spent more time browsing the forums, so that he could find genius training advice such as this

Poundstone overtrains – and often injures himself in the gym. He’s still one of the strongest guys around, but he needs to be smarter in his training, so he’ll peak at WSM.

Derek strikes Derek again. He’s hurt. But he’s going to risk further injury anyway.

ironmind.com/ironmind/opencms/Articles/ 2013/Mar/Derek_Poundstone-Into_WSM_on_1_Arm.html

You can actually hear his bicep tear in the Arnold video, it’s gnarly.

To be honest Brain was just beaten by better men on the day.
He has had his moment and now it’s the turn of Lalas and Thor to take over.

[quote]cunniff1981 wrote:
To be honest Brain was just beaten by better men on the day.
He has had his moment and now it’s the turn of Lalas and Thor to take over.[/quote]

I definitely disagree. I’ve compared the performances from Shaw from 2010/2011 to 2012. He was significantly better in the previous two years. If he can properly heal up, he should be fine for the coming year.

I think Poundstone hasn’t won and won’t win for two main reasons.

  1. He peaked in 2008 when he should have/could have/would have, but didn’t, win. Every year he has done worse than the previous year.

  2. His training has caught up with him. He injures himself too often. If he had manged his injuries better a few years ago, he could have had another shot at winning, but I think his chance passed him by.

I hope I’m wrong about him, but all the evidence is against him. Then again, I also though Phil Pfister would never win and he had that fluke/amazing performance in 2006. It’s like he was a different man that year.

It’s an odd comparison, but I think Strongman is a bit like Jeopardy. How well a competitor does depends a lot on the categories. No one is going to beat Big Z in the static events. Whereas, the smaller guys tend to do better in the events that favor speed and athleticism. Personally, I’d like to see the governing bodies start testing for performance enhancing drugs. Would Pudzianowski have won ANYTHING if he hadn’t been popping steroids like jelly beans? To paraphrase the late, great Steve Reeves: If you can’t be strong with just your God-given testosterone, take up another sport – like ping-pong.

[quote]Staraj wrote:
It’s an odd comparison, but I think Strongman is a bit like Jeopardy. How well a competitor does depends a lot on the categories. No one is going to beat Big Z in the static events. Whereas, the smaller guys tend to do better in the events that favor speed and athleticism. Personally, I’d like to see the governing bodies start testing for performance enhancing drugs. Would Pudzianowski have won ANYTHING if he hadn’t been popping steroids like jelly beans? To paraphrase the late, great Steve Reeves: If you can’t be strong with just your God-given testosterone, take up another sport – like ping-pong. [/quote]

It would kind of defeat the obejct of the competition if the winnner isn’t actually the strongest man in the world if they did that.

People like to see super human feats of strength, not just regular guys lifting weights that you could see someone in the gym lifting.

[quote]Staraj wrote:
It’s an odd comparison, but I think Strongman is a bit like Jeopardy. How well a competitor does depends a lot on the categories. No one is going to beat Big Z in the static events. Whereas, the smaller guys tend to do better in the events that favor speed and athleticism. Personally, I’d like to see the governing bodies start testing for performance enhancing drugs. Would Pudzianowski have won ANYTHING if he hadn’t been popping steroids like jelly beans? To paraphrase the late, great Steve Reeves: If you can’t be strong with just your God-given testosterone, take up another sport – like ping-pong. [/quote]

It’s interesting to note that Big Z isn’t the biggest guy out there. A lot of the top guys like Brian Shaw, Terry Hollands, Haflor Bjornsson, and Mike Jenkins are heavier than he is. Definitely some of the events favor certain athletes, but it’s often not what you would expect. Big Z can move.

As far as PEDs, the problem with testing for them is that the testing never catches everything. While philosophically that isn’t a good reason to not test, it does present a pragmatic hurdle. Instead of creating an even playing field where everyone is all natural, drug testing creates an arms race where opportunities are more disparate since only those with access to the best drugs and strategies are able to compete while using PEDs. Those with less access are forced to compete natural. Nobody can say if Pudzianowski would have been dominant in a drug tested field, but that doesn’t change the fact that popping PEDs doesn’t instantly make you able to do the things that Mariusz did. He was dominant in a non-drug tested field, which isn’t really any less impressive (the fact that much of his dominance took place while some of the best strongmen were in a different organization is a bigger asterisk on his performance, in my opinion).

To compare it to a different sport, I don’t think that the French hated Lance Armstrong because he cheated. They hated him because he cheated better than they did. While some people always get caught, there will always be others that get through. Does that really seem more fair to you than just letting everyone take the best drugs they can get a hold of and then compete on that basis?

This has to be the longest thread by a persistent troll that I’ve ever seen.

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
This has to be the longest thread by a persistent troll that I’ve ever seen.[/quote]
Lol, I actually never noticed how bad the OP was trolling until you pointed it out. I wasn’t even reading his posts, I was just reading everyone elses.

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
This has to be the longest thread by a persistent troll that I’ve ever seen.[/quote]
Lol, I actually never noticed how bad the OP was trolling until you pointed it out. I wasn’t even reading his posts, I was just reading everyone elses.[/quote]

Can we use this as a 2013 WSM and future speculation thread? I like theorizing about future compeitions in various sports.

I think if Big Z competes, he’ll be on the podium for sure. He said himself that he’ll retire as soon as he stops getting stronger. Lalas probably has to win this year or next if he ever wants to win, but he’ll basically have to win every event his size doesn’t give him a disadvantage.

I think Shaw is also peaking, but has at least 1 more potential victory in the tank. On the note of giants, Thor has 6-7 years until he peaks, so he could potentially be the next great Icelandic strongman.

Dark horses for next year are Misha, Mike Jenkins, Derek Poundstone, and Laurence Shahlaei. If Britain is going to win in the next couple years, it’s going to be Shahlaei. He’s getting better every year while Hollands appears to have peaked. They do have a great future in a few years with Eddie Hall though, he hadn’t even trained for Strongman specifically back in 2012.

What do you guys think?

The first time I laid eyes on Hafbor Bjornsson, I thought he was destined for the top of the WSM podium. Look at the size of his mitts! But I’ve been disappointed with his overhead pressing. And like the other tall guys, he’s at a disadvantage in the dead lift. Maybe like Pfister, it’s just a matter of time for him. Pound for pound, I think Vytautas Lalas is the strongest guy on the circuit. However, there are no pound-for-pound awards. Mike Jenkins looks like a comer, but he needs more experience, so he can compete smarter. He’s got raw strength a plenty. Sooooo . . . unless Derek stops hurting himself or Brian gets on another roll – and all things (drugs) being equal – Big Z is still the man.

[quote]Staraj wrote:
The first time I laid eyes on Hafbor Bjornsson, I thought he was destined for the top of the WSM podium. Look at the size of his mitts! But I’ve been disappointed with his overhead pressing. And like the other tall guys, he’s at a disadvantage in the dead lift. Maybe like Pfister, it’s just a matter of time for him. Pound for pound, I think Vytautas Lalas is the strongest guy on the circuit. However, there are no pound-for-pound awards. Mike Jenkins looks like a comer, but he needs more experience, so he can compete smarter. He’s got raw strength a plenty. Sooooo . . . unless Derek stops hurting himself or Brian gets on another roll – and all things (drugs) being equal – Big Z is still the man.[/quote]
Remember how young Hafthor is though. Historically WSM champions have been well into their 30’s at least. In fact it is almost unheard of for a man in his 20’s to even be competing at the top level in strongman, much less getting a podium spot (3rd place in 2012). It just takes such a long time to build the kind of strength for the sport that it’s nearly impossible to have in your 20’s. Not to mention the years of experience with events and sport specific techniques. Brian Shaw is stronger than ever; I saw him at the Arnold. I would also say Mike Jenkins has plenty of experience and is a little more qualified than “a comer” given that he beat all the top guys and won the Arnold last year as well.

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]Staraj wrote:
The first time I laid eyes on Hafbor Bjornsson, I thought he was destined for the top of the WSM podium. Look at the size of his mitts! But I’ve been disappointed with his overhead pressing. And like the other tall guys, he’s at a disadvantage in the dead lift. Maybe like Pfister, it’s just a matter of time for him. Pound for pound, I think Vytautas Lalas is the strongest guy on the circuit. However, there are no pound-for-pound awards. Mike Jenkins looks like a comer, but he needs more experience, so he can compete smarter. He’s got raw strength a plenty. Sooooo . . . unless Derek stops hurting himself or Brian gets on another roll – and all things (drugs) being equal – Big Z is still the man.[/quote]
Remember how young Hafthor is though. Historically WSM champions have been well into their 30’s at least. In fact it is almost unheard of for a man in his 20’s to even be competing at the top level in strongman, much less getting a podium spot (3rd place in 2012). It just takes such a long time to build the kind of strength for the sport that it’s nearly impossible to have in your 20’s. Not to mention the years of experience with events and sport specific techniques. Brian Shaw is stronger than ever; I saw him at the Arnold. I would also say Mike Jenkins has plenty of experience and is a little more qualified than “a comer” given that he beat all the top guys and won the Arnold last year as well.[/quote]

Yeah, but I think Hafthor’s age means he could have a dominant period in WSM in the upcoming years. He has 6-7 years to peak!

[quote]BCP27 wrote:

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]Staraj wrote:
The first time I laid eyes on Hafbor Bjornsson, I thought he was destined for the top of the WSM podium. Look at the size of his mitts! But I’ve been disappointed with his overhead pressing. And like the other tall guys, he’s at a disadvantage in the dead lift. Maybe like Pfister, it’s just a matter of time for him. Pound for pound, I think Vytautas Lalas is the strongest guy on the circuit. However, there are no pound-for-pound awards. Mike Jenkins looks like a comer, but he needs more experience, so he can compete smarter. He’s got raw strength a plenty. Sooooo . . . unless Derek stops hurting himself or Brian gets on another roll – and all things (drugs) being equal – Big Z is still the man.[/quote]
Remember how young Hafthor is though. Historically WSM champions have been well into their 30’s at least. In fact it is almost unheard of for a man in his 20’s to even be competing at the top level in strongman, much less getting a podium spot (3rd place in 2012). It just takes such a long time to build the kind of strength for the sport that it’s nearly impossible to have in your 20’s. Not to mention the years of experience with events and sport specific techniques. Brian Shaw is stronger than ever; I saw him at the Arnold. I would also say Mike Jenkins has plenty of experience and is a little more qualified than “a comer” given that he beat all the top guys and won the Arnold last year as well.[/quote]

Yeah, but I think Hafthor’s age means he could have a dominant period in WSM in the upcoming years. He has 6-7 years to peak!

[/quote]
Well that was kind of my point lol.