Brad Pitt Physique

“Today, super-slow’s popularity is growing. Celebrities like actor Brad Pitt use the technique as a way to build muscle quickly.”

“After my boring safety note, I know that many of you are wondering, “Ok, so how do I get muscles like Brad Pitt had in ‘Troy’?” As a matter of fact, Brad used a relatively new method of lifting weights called super-slow weight lifting. Developed in 1982 by personal trainer Ken Hutchins, this technique can help you build 50% more muscle in 10 weeks than regular lifting can.”

http://www.gmtoday.com/content/NSL/2003/May/64.asp

Any opinons on this sort of training?

The general consensus seems to be that super-slow training super sucks. But, like anything, it may work for a few weeks.

i don buy it. i guess where it could work would be in the eccentric phase, but you will be so busted from the concentric, and your loads will be too low, then the effect will be poor.

The best program is the one that you will actually perform regularly. I tried Super Slow and was SUPER BORED!

Yea, it worked for a while, no better or worse than any new routine that I have tried. The problem was getting to the Gym, this has never been a problem for me, until I tried Super Slow.

Seriously…I hated it! I will never do it again and you can’t make me :slight_smile:

who wants to look like Brad Pitt anyway
:slight_smile:

Personally, I’ve never asked myself how Brad Pitt got anything. Well, except for Jennifer Aniston. And it looks as if Brad don’t know how o hold on to her.

I agree with Deanosumo, just another gimmick.

if you read the article, super slow is placed into context and the article is in now way advertising.

And if you are on a bunch of AAS then even super slow will work well.

Yeah, the local news was hyping this type of training up as the best thing you could possibly do. It killed me because the guy that was hyping it was pathetic. He said it was the only way to train, while doing super slow reps on the Hammer Strength bench with a whole 35lbs on each side. He was extremely ripped though. He sported a nice 12 pack. You know, skin and ribs. Fucking Yoda’s.

Oh yeah, who want’s to look like Brad Pitt? My physique is way better than his, and 90% of this site should be too. All the tools are right in front of you.

WHEW!!!

I’m glad this wasn’t another "I-want-to-look-like-Brad-Pitt-in-“Fight Club” thread!

(I would have had to pull my hair out!!!)

Mufasa

I don’t know if it’s still archived, by waaaaaaay back (as in, the first few months of the forum being around) Tim Patterson actually had a few pretty involved posts about Super Slow training.

If memory serves, Tim actually worked with Hutchins for a while (and, in fact, in Hutchins original book, he was mentioned by name, unless it was another Tim Patterson).

In any event from what I recall, Tim, having been very experienced with HIT, Super Slow, and a wide variety of other training styles/methods/paradigms/philosophies had concluded that Super Slow can be effective for brief periods of time, but ultimately is not exceptionally great for hypertrophy. Quite good for rehab and teaching form, though.

From my own experience with my athletes and myself, I personally believe that SuperSlow has merit when used within the context of other programs. That is, I would never have someone training solely with the SuperSlow system, but will often incorporate SuperSlow reps (or even merely a SS concentric) into a training program.

It works very well as a finisher - a few 10 up/10 down pullups at the end of a biceps or back workout is a great exhaustion method, and can often lead to great gains.

I would not recommend training with Super Slow exclusively for those that are looking to put on size; as previously mentiond, the loads will be much too low.

Again, do a search for Tims old posts. I know he had a lot to say on the subject. Or, failing that, it’s possible that he’ll repost some stuff.

[quote]miniross wrote:
if you read the article, super slow is placed into context and the article is in now way advertising.

And if you are on a bunch of AAS then even super slow will work well.[/quote]

you meant in “no way” right? I skimmed the article and your right they have quotes in the article from critics of the technique.
Its like a lot of other ideas in fitness, take an idea hype it up so it sounds like its the only thing out there that will work, then sell it and rake in the dough.

I’m not saying I agree with Super-Slow, but this Nietzel guy who speaks out against it in the article is just as ignorant as the rest of them:

“According to Neitzel, fitness experts warn participants won’t bulk up as much when involved in super-slow, but say you will get stronger. The bulkiness comes from a lot of volume in the lifts.”

Oh, well then I guess I can go back to the ridiculous-volume pro workouts in the muscle rags now when I want to get bigger. Whatever…

On another note, it’s a pretty widely accepted fact that an extended eccentric portion of a lift induces greater hypertrophy (as well as strength gains) than the concentric portion of the lift (over the long haul, provided ample recovery; it’s very easy to overtrain eccentrically), and if Super-Slow gets a few people to concentrate more on their eccentrics, then cheers. Most people think the concentric lift is the only part, hence all of the swinging, bouncing, and dropping you see in the gym.

P.S. Someone is bound to say “Prove it…”, but I have too much going on with school and other shit to go rooting around for journal references. If you’re really that interested though, go search for it yourself, you’ll find it. Hell I think even Thibs wrote about this…

I realized after reading Romaniello’s post that I forgot to add I do agree, however, that Super-Slow should not be done for extended periods (although I did say too much eccentric emphasis can lead to overtraining). I too believe it can be useful periodically to change up training, and push the muscles to new growth…

Isn’t there an article here on T-nation that deals with super slow from a while back. I think it concluded the hypertrophy gains are equivalent to other programs while the strength gains were nonexistent.

It does have value! I like it very much. But, like a true HIT workout it’s not something you do week in & week out. I add a superslow workout about every 6 weeks. It’s for SURE a great way to mix it up & fool your muscles!

[quote]Jersey5150 wrote:
miniross wrote:
if you read the article, super slow is placed into context and the article is in now way advertising.

And if you are on a bunch of AAS then even super slow will work well.

you meant in “no way” right? I skimmed the article and your right they have quotes in the article from critics of the technique.
Its like a lot of other ideas in fitness, take an idea hype it up so it sounds like its the only thing out there that will work, then sell it and rake in the dough.[/quote]

yes