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Boxing/ Training Question

Bit of background,

long time advanced sports player, fairly advanced bodybuilder/ weight trainer, beginner boxer.

Since i started boxing when we train, my shoulders are killing me from punching/ keeping my guard up (yes I’m that new at it)

Should i be:

a) not training shoulders in the gym to keep them as fresh as possible for boxing plus thinking they will get enough of a work out.

b) training them to try to make them stronger so the aren’t so f-ing sore.

Cheers

b

I would lay off weight training for your shoulders except for some light prehab exercises such as ones for your rotator cuffs (which are supposed to be light anyways) as well as caution you against overdoing it in the beginning.

Everyone is different, however, it was a bit too much for me to be doing heavy striking even every other day when I first started. I had to break up my training sessions into twice a week in the beginning until my shoulders and other moving parts were able to catch up.

Now I am able to lift twice weekly in addition to training striking four times a week along with all the other crap I do for BJJ

Unfortunately I had to learn the hard way with a torn rotator cuff which I suffered in a jiu-jitsu match off of a hip toss, but I feel the injury was precipitated by excessive(for me) boxing training.

For the moment limit the shoulder training…don’t drop it completely. The sorenes your feeling is normal. Everybody goes through it when they first take up boxing…especially if your using 16oz gloves. It will pass quickly.

OMC

[quote]slimjim wrote:
I would lay off weight training for your shoulders except for some light prehab exercises such as ones for your rotator cuffs (which are supposed to be light anyways) as well as caution you against overdoing it in the beginning.

Everyone is different, however, it was a bit too much for me to be doing heavy striking even every other day when I first started. I had to break up my training sessions into twice a week in the beginning until my shoulders and other moving parts were able to catch up.

Now I am able to lift twice weekly in addition to training striking four times a week along with all the other crap I do for BJJ

Unfortunately I had to learn the hard way with a torn rotator cuff which I suffered in a jiu-jitsu match off of a hip toss, but I feel the injury was precipitated by excessive(for me) boxing training.[/quote]

Agreed

Ditch all isolation exercises. I never train my shoulders when I’m concentrating on boxing.

They’re getting fucked up when you bench, press and squat so why do anything else?

Thanks for the replies guys

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
Thanks for the replies guys[/quote]

Just want to stress how important it is to take time off from lifting and make sure you can handle the workload.

Between shadowboxing, padwork, heavy bag, etc. your rotators are going to get beat on, as well as your front deltoids (and to a lesser extent, your rear delts from pulling punches back.)

Make sure you start doing some rotator cuff work when you get your workload up. Would have saved me a lot of trouble had I done so also.

The lifting comes second. It’s hard sometimes, but you have to remember that.

In general people overdo shoulder training, but to really answer your question we need more info. How many days you train shoulders, how many days you train striking, what the volume is like, if your are on a split, etc. I have found that modified EDT (Staley) works well for striking conditioning, if you’re not overdoing the striking specific training.