T Nation

Boxing Training Camps


#1

What is the boxing equivalent of going to thailand and training Muay Thai?

Going to cuba? Would you be able to train there as a foreigner?

Mexico? Again, is it set up like thailand were there are gyms very welcoming to foreigners to come and train?

I'm looking at going to thailand for 3 weeks, maybe a month to train and want to add the boxing equivalent to my bucket list.


#2

[quote]Kirks wrote:
What is the boxing equivalent of going to thailand and training Muay Thai?

Going to cuba? Would you be able to train there as a foreigner?

Mexico? Again, is it set up like thailand were there are gyms very welcoming to foreigners to come and train?

I’m looking at going to thailand for 3 weeks, maybe a month to train and want to add the boxing equivalent to my bucket list.
[/quote]
Boxing training camps haven’t been commercialized as much as that in other sports. (in so much as nobody has yet exploited the idea!)
You must make your own arrangements, but most gyms are welcoming once you pay the monthly fee.

One handy alternative are the training camps offered by the like of John Tandy, who do a package to house, feed and train fighters (John’s being in Tenerife I think?)
Lee Murtagh certainly attends one in Tenerife before many of his fights.

But to more specifically answer your questions.
Yes Cuba is an option with paid schools surrounding the capital for English speaking people.
There are open gyms around Mexico city- I believe even the Romanza is welcoming.

But if I were to do a training camp, I actually wouldn’t go to one of these- I would instead select to travel to somewhere more comfortable- like London or Manchester and attend TKO or Peacocks (who both have nice rates for everyday use and good rates for one to ones ) and also avail of some world class strength and conditioning facilities in an area easily navigable by efficient public transport.
Regardless which side of the pacific you are from there are options


#3

[quote]Kirks wrote:
What is the boxing equivalent of going to thailand and training Muay Thai?
[/quote]

Kenny Weldon’s place here in Houston.


#4

[quote]Kirks wrote:
What is the boxing equivalent of going to thailand and training Muay Thai?

Going to cuba? Would you be able to train there as a foreigner?

Mexico? Again, is it set up like thailand were there are gyms very welcoming to foreigners to come and train?

I’m looking at going to thailand for 3 weeks, maybe a month to train and want to add the boxing equivalent to my bucket list.
[/quote]

Well no, it’s not really the same thing - as far as I know, there aren’t a whole lot of sponsored “boxing team” type things like they do in Thailand, but most coaches are very welcoming as long as you’re ready to work and not going to waste their time.

I suggest you read “A Fighter’s Heart” by Sam Sheridan, he did the Thailand thing and then did something with Virgil Hill in Oakland that is probably as close as you could come to the equivalent here.

Basic advice - get a cheap shitty apartment near where you want to train and train there.

In LA it’s the Wild Card Boxing Gym, in Oakland it’s Virgil Hill’s place, in Houston there are some great trainers, up here in NJ there’s several good gyms for amateurs, namely Aces Boxing Club in Boonton, Global Boxing Gym in North Bergen, Elite Heat in Newark, etc., in New York City there’s the Church Street Gym and what’s left of Gleason’s (it ain’t what it used to be), etc.

If you wanted to go abroad - and I’m not really sure why you would because America puts out some of the best boxers - I would say going to Mexico City to train with Nacho Beristain is probably the best thing to do. Kinda similar to what they did on this “Fight Quest.” I forget who the other coach is on this one, but he’s also well-known and renowned.

Typically you can just call the gym and ask what’s going on and how you get to train there. Boxing gyms are not very pretentious.


#5

Here is another video on boxing in Mexico. But keep in mind that while there’s a kabillion of you MMA types looking to make your Thailand pilgrimmages every year nowadays, an American going to Mexico to box is still kind of rare (as far as I understand) and it’s still dangerous considering Mexican kidnappings, cartels, etc.

Watch your ass if you do go.


#6

and dont laugh if you see marquez drinking his own piss


#7

[quote]Aussie Davo wrote:
and dont laugh if you see marquez drinking his own piss[/quote]

hahah hey! He said he doesn’t do that anymore…


#8

Thanks for the replies guys.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

If you wanted to go abroad - and I’m not really sure why you would because America puts out some of the best boxers - I would say going to Mexico City to train with Nacho Beristain is probably the best thing to do. Kinda similar to what they did on this “Fight Quest.” I forget who the other coach is on this one, but he’s also well-known and renowned.
[/quote]

I’m from Australia. So I will have to go abroad. This is why going to Thailand is easy for me but to do the same for boxing is going to be a bucket list item for now, cos I’ll probably have to work it in with other travels.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Here is another video on boxing in Mexico. But keep in mind that while there’s a kabillion of you MMA types looking to make your Thailand pilgrimmages every year nowadays, an American going to Mexico to box is still kind of rare (as far as I understand) and it’s still dangerous considering Mexican kidnappings, cartels, etc.

Watch your ass if you do go.
[/quote]

I’m not an MMA type, but cheers anyway. I started Muay Thai at the start of the year and I loved it so much I started boxing about a month ago or so ago. And I want to experience doing the ‘real’ way (for lack of a better term).


#9

[quote]Kirks wrote:
Thanks for the replies guys.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

If you wanted to go abroad - and I’m not really sure why you would because America puts out some of the best boxers - I would say going to Mexico City to train with Nacho Beristain is probably the best thing to do. Kinda similar to what they did on this “Fight Quest.” I forget who the other coach is on this one, but he’s also well-known and renowned.
[/quote]

I’m from Australia. So I will have to go abroad. This is why going to Thailand is easy for me but to do the same for boxing is going to be a bucket list item for now, cos I’ll probably have to work it in with other travels.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Here is another video on boxing in Mexico. But keep in mind that while there’s a kabillion of you MMA types looking to make your Thailand pilgrimmages every year nowadays, an American going to Mexico to box is still kind of rare (as far as I understand) and it’s still dangerous considering Mexican kidnappings, cartels, etc.

Watch your ass if you do go.
[/quote]

I’m not an MMA type, but cheers anyway. I started Muay Thai at the start of the year and I loved it so much I started boxing about a month ago or so ago. And I want to experience doing the ‘real’ way (for lack of a better term). [/quote]

OK, my mistake, I thought you were an American.

Like I said, if you want to do it “real” way, then, as recommended, read “A Fighter’s Heart,” see how he did it, and do something similar.

Coming to America to learn to box is reasonable, because no matter how dangerous the ghetto, it’s still probably safer than Mexico City.

My recommendation is LA at the Wildcard or Oakland with Virgil Hill.


#10

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

OK, my mistake, I thought you were an American.

Like I said, if you want to do it “real” way, then, as recommended, read “A Fighter’s Heart,” see how he did it, and do something similar.

Coming to America to learn to box is reasonable, because no matter how dangerous the ghetto, it’s still probably safer than Mexico City.

My recommendation is LA at the Wildcard or Oakland with Virgil Hill.[/quote]

I’ll look into the book, cheers. I was thinking America might be good because there does seem to be a lot more gyms and it’s a lot more mainstream. Boxing is well down the list of sports in Aus, and when you have 1/10th of the population as America, it means that it’s more of a niche market. So while there are gyms here, and we do have some world class fighters, it’s sort of few and far between. It’s a sport I’d love to experience in it’s ‘heartland’ at a top gym.

I am looking at working a snow season in Canada so spending some time in the states training would work in pretty well.

Thanks.


#11

[quote]Kirks wrote:
I’ll look into the book, cheers. I was thinking America might be good because there does seem to be a lot more gyms and it’s a lot more mainstream. Boxing is well down the list of sports in Aus, and when you have 1/10th of the population as America, it means that it’s more of a niche market. So while there are gyms here, and we do have some world class fighters, it’s sort of few and far between. It’s a sport I’d love to experience in it’s ‘heartland’ at a top gym.

I am looking at working a snow season in Canada so spending some time in the states training would work in pretty well.

Thanks.[/quote]
If in Canada there are some pretty good boxing coaches available- acclaimed mma gym tri start have sylvain gagnon who did some work with Jean Pascal.
The tri star is obviously very open to guys paying to train.

Also if you’re paying to train; get to Ireland; I’ll coach ya pal haha :smiley:


#12

If you’re here during snow season look around Big Bear, CA. Larry Goosen and Emanuel Steward both used to have great camps up there. Since Steward died last year I’m not sure if there’s a go-to like Kronk anymore, but it used to have a reputation as a place that turned out soul-crushingly agressive fighters with bottomless gastanks. If one of Steward’s people still has a gym up there I’d look into it. My one experince with altitude training was a good one, and I recommend it.


#13

Awesome. Cheers.


#14

Well, Utah is the best place for training in boxing gyms.


#15

Im here in Thailand and I can tell you American Boxing is being taught at many of the Muay Thai camps. Everything is being incorporated into one training site…MMA, Strength Training, Muay Thai, and Boxing. The more traditional camps and schools are just good ole Thai boxing and Muay Chaiya.

Most of the guys I have spoken with from UK, Russia, and USA already have some boxing training so they tend to opt towards the other skill sets. However, most have said the American Boxing skills taught here are very good.

Edit: …to add…Thailand is a one stop shop for everything fighting. Guys are here on 1 year visas and extending just for all the training available.

I grew up in Newark, NJ, USA so to me the boxing there is the best. Otherwise, I would head to the UK


#16

[quote]reconbyfire wrote:
Im here in Thailand and I can tell you American Boxing is being taught at many of the Muay Thai camps. Everything is being incorporated into one training site…MMA, Strength Training, Muay Thai, and Boxing. The more traditional camps and schools are just good ole Thai boxing and Muay Chaiya.

Most of the guys I have spoken with from UK, Russia, and USA already have some boxing training so they tend to opt towards the other skill sets. However, most have said the American Boxing skills taught here are very good.

Edit: …to add…Thailand is a one stop shop for everything fighting. Guys are here on 1 year visas and extending just for all the training available.

I grew up in Newark, NJ, USA so to me the boxing there is the best. Otherwise, I would head to the UK[/quote]
AMERICAN boxing?

I do not recognise this sport.


#17

here is an old discussion about the same exact thing-

training in cuba.

http://128.121.26.57/free_online_forum/sports_boxing_fighting_mma_combat/training_in_cuba

Rules for travel and hostility towards ‘english speakers’ has diminished allot.
there are a TON of places to train in that area but its going to be
boxing and judo