T Nation

Boxing and Training

So a couple a of weeks ago I got into boxing for the most part because I always wanted to. All of my life I have focused on weight lifting with the occasional team sports but, I have seem to have gotten bored with it. Now that I started boxing I feel like I have gotten new life. The training and everything involved is new to me so it is great. However, I am having trouble putting together a good plan. I have the basics of boxing down but, I want to focus on my skills and technique. How does this look?

Mon: Boxing Work-Strength Training-Plyometrics

Tues: Boxing Work-Conditioning-Core Training

Wed: Foot Work-Strength Training-Plyometrics

Thur: Boxing Work-Conditioning-Core Training

Fri: Boxing Work-Strength Training-Plyometrics

Sat: Boxing Work-Conditioning-Core Training

Sun:Off

I was also wondering if it made a difference if I trained in the morning and did my running at later in the day.

Now I do not know if it makes a difference but,if it seems like to much I am used to high volume and I have a lot of time I go to school from 7-12 in the morning and thats it no job. How ever if it still seems like overkill I am open to suggestions. Any feed back is appreciated.

Do yourself a favor man and cut that volume back.

Strength training comes last, especially when you’re new and just learning all of the skills. Don’t be surprised if you can only lift once a week, if that.

Don’t worry- you’ll be able to go back eventually. But remember that skills and conditioning are #1 and #2 in boxing, not weightlifting.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Do yourself a favor man and cut that volume back.

Strength training comes last, especially when you’re new and just learning all of the skills. Don’t be surprised if you can only lift once a week, if that.

Don’t worry- you’ll be able to go back eventually. But remember that skills and conditioning are #1 and #2 in boxing, not weightlifting.[/quote]

x2

You can also roll your strength and conditioning into one (sandbag work + sprits etc.). I favor a three day a week plan… sparring and conditioning each day. Then do technique work whenever you can.

Fixed.

i went down from 5 days to 3 for boxing and i feel much fresher and able to get a better quality workout in. i do the crossfit wod everyday along with my pushups/situps/shadowboxing as conditioning.

I’ve been boxing for about a year now. I agree that you should focus on technique and conditioning more than strength training. I would limit strength work to twice a week and build from there. let your body recover from the bag work and sparring; have complete recovery days.

good job man, you have to find the thing that you enjoy to keep you motivated. just a few tips i would suggest:
For your strength training i would do a couple of full body workouts, you could probably get away with just two a week without losing strength for a while.

Power cleans, deadlifts, bench press, overhead press, squats. Work on your max strength in theses sessions, nothing over 6 reps, that’ll hold your strength and size, your boxing and conditioning work will bring your power/speed up.
As said already, cut down the volume a bit, except for skill work, do that as much as you can.

You prob already do, but just incase you do get a good boxing coach.
Wat kind of plyometrics are you doing?, normally 1 day rest beween plyo sessions is not enough.
wat are you running for? other than maybe some sprints running will be no good for you.

OP, wat did you go with? how has it been going for you?

Check with your boxing trainer for a strength training routine. If he can’t give you one, find another boxing gym.

The best way to get better at boxing is to box = sparring and drills. Outside of the boxing gym, you should be doing interval training for cardio and strength training.

Sparring = #1 way to get better…

My old coach used to get us to do alternate strenth training on different nights.

I understand that you’re inspired because I was exactly the same. I found new things to get excited about. Let your coach know exactly what you are doing, especially with the running.

My routine was once:
Mon to Fri - 20min run, 20 min skip, 10 min stretch before one hour training sess. Strength training (however long it took for us to finish the list).
Sat - 10k run

My coach MADE told me to stop… but I had to stop because I got really sick. You will reach a point where you overtrain so much it affects your immune system.

I used to do lots of running just because I enjoyed it. Unfortunately you will be more inclined to benefit from stair/hill sprints than any other type of running.

Remember to train for your sport. Boxing is about reaction and recovery. You want to come back to your last round as fresh as your first.

My old coach set up a training plan leading up to fights aswell…

CHECK OUT ROSSBOXING.COM

Your plan should be determined by if your leading up to a fight or in between competition. Until you have established that a lot of the advice you will get (with the exception of prioritising technique) will be wrong or misplaced.

Example (Me)

Not currently building up to fight and taking time out to strenghten other aspects of my game.

Weight training about 4-5 times per week but focusing on strenght and explosiveness.

Pad work/sparring about 2-3 times a week (this is my conditioning and some technique) I don’t run in this training phase as it is unnecessary.

:Example (client who is pro fighter)

Building up to fight.

Weight training has changed focus to sport specific strenght, power endurance and cardiovascular endurance using padwork and in some cases cardio machines mixed into conditioning circuits which take the form of rounds similar or greater than that of competition.

Traditional running is still limited as fighting is not a steady state activity and crossover is limited. Wind sprints are the only exception to this…in certain cases.

Hope this gives you some ideas mate. Best of luck with your future bouts if any.

-OMC

[quote]OMC wrote:
Your plan should be determined by if your leading up to a fight or in between competition. Until you have established that a lot of the advice you will get (with the exception of prioritising technique) will be wrong or misplaced.

Example (Me)

Not currently building up to fight and taking time out to strenghten other aspects of my game.

Weight training about 4-5 times per week but focusing on strenght and explosiveness.

Pad work/sparring about 2-3 times a week (this is my conditioning and some technique) I don’t run in this training phase as it is unnecessary.

:Example (client who is pro fighter)

Building up to fight.

Weight training has changed focus to sport specific strenght, power endurance and cardiovascular endurance using padwork and in some cases cardio machines mixed into conditioning circuits which take the form of rounds similar or greater than that of competition.

Traditional running is still limited as fighting is not a steady state activity and crossover is limited. Wind sprints are the only exception to this…in certain cases.

Hope this gives you some ideas mate. Best of luck with your future bouts if any.

-OMC[/quote]

Do you do any roadwork leading up to a fight?

OMC is right…

How you approach your training should be determined whether you are boxing for recreation or are going to box competitively. My training changed greatly leading up to my last fight.

This is something that you should talk to your boxing coach about. He will be very interested in your conditioning if you are going to join the gyms boxing team. (I assume that you are talking about a real boxing gym and not a boxing fitness class.)

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
OMC wrote:
Your plan should be determined by if your leading up to a fight or in between competition. Until you have established that a lot of the advice you will get (with the exception of prioritising technique) will be wrong or misplaced.

Example (Me)

Not currently building up to fight and taking time out to strenghten other aspects of my game.

Weight training about 4-5 times per week but focusing on strenght and explosiveness.

Pad work/sparring about 2-3 times a week (this is my conditioning and some technique) I don’t run in this training phase as it is unnecessary.

:Example (client who is pro fighter)

Building up to fight.

Weight training has changed focus to sport specific strenght, power endurance and cardiovascular endurance using padwork and in some cases cardio machines mixed into conditioning circuits which take the form of rounds similar or greater than that of competition.

Traditional running is still limited as fighting is not a steady state activity and crossover is limited. Wind sprints are the only exception to this…in certain cases.

Hope this gives you some ideas mate. Best of luck with your future bouts if any.

-OMC

Do you do any roadwork leading up to a fight?[/quote]

I did less road work in lead up to my fight, but picked it up towards the end to drop weight.

[quote]boxingash wrote:

I did less road work in lead up to my fight, but picked it up towards the end to drop weight.
[/quote]

I’ll elaborated on the roadwork part. I feel roadwork is overused in boxing…especially at the highest level. I do however think that in a 12 round fight you need to establish an aerobic base as you are working constantly for 36 minutes with minute breaks and there is nowhere to rest as clinching is not tolerated.

I do know and have coached and trained with several amateur boxing champions who do road work like they were training for 12 rounds. That is ridiculous and a waste of time. 4 2 minute rounds do not require the same training as 12 3 minute rounds.

The client I used as an example is a pro MMA fighter. Not a boxer. For a pro boxer I would increase both steady state cardio and wave cardio and make the necessary adjustments to their conditioning circuits layout

-OMC

[quote]OMC wrote:
boxingash wrote:

I did less road work in lead up to my fight, but picked it up towards the end to drop weight.

I’ll elaborated on the roadwork part. I feel roadwork is overused in boxing…especially at the highest level. I do however think that in a 12 round fight you need to establish an aerobic base as you are working constantly for 36 minutes with minute breaks and there is nowhere to rest as clinching is not tolerated.

-OMC[/quote]

Road work is a traditional means and has some merits. But there are others out there. Oscar De La Hoya did alot of work in the pool in the lead up to his Mayweather fight.

[quote]boxingash wrote:
OMC wrote:
boxingash wrote:

I did less road work in lead up to my fight, but picked it up towards the end to drop weight.

I’ll elaborated on the roadwork part. I feel roadwork is overused in boxing…especially at the highest level. I do however think that in a 12 round fight you need to establish an aerobic base as you are working constantly for 36 minutes with minute breaks and there is nowhere to rest as clinching is not tolerated.

-OMC

Road work is a traditional means and has some merits. But there are others out there. Oscar De La Hoya did alot of work in the pool in the lead up to his Mayweather fight.
[/quote]

DLH would gas in a three round fight though, he always has been a very, very weak finisher.

Alot of people are quick to knock roadwork, but every champion in the history of fighting has done tons of it. And the people who always say, “Oh, you don’t need that” amazingly always tend to be people that are… well, nobodies.

Can’t argue with results.

I second rossboxing.com Tonnes of great info on his site to get you going. Anaerobic work should be the core of your conditioning program IMO. Other then that structure your workouts around your sparring.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Alot of people are quick to knock roadwork, but every champion in the history of fighting has done tons of it. And the people who always say, “Oh, you don’t need that” amazingly always tend to be people that are… well, nobodies.

Can’t argue with results. [/quote]

So true.

Alot of “experts” bash on roadwork, but it seems to me every professional boxer does it.

I’ve heard alot of knocking of skipping, but I found it excellent (and loved it), especially when it came to doubles.