T Nation

BOSU Trainers

Has Anyone had any experience with these devices? They are sort of like half stability balls with a flat board surface opposite the 1/2 ball. I’m intrigued by the concept and wanted some info before investing in one. God Bless America. Thanks.

I have seen them at the gym and priced them on the internet … they’re about $129 and don’t think it’s worth it. Stick with a regular stability ball. You can do plenty of things without these things. But yes, they look intriguing.

Bosu trainers are the shit. Who ever doesn’t think that doesn’t know stability training. This device is amazing for rehab settings, lunges, squats, shoulder press. The average person is unable to stand on a stability ball, but can stand on a bosu. I have purchased a bosu and love it. You can do so much with it, don’t ever underestimate a device that will increase knee stability, core strenght, and power.

my personal advice…
don’t buy it

they are expansive and useless.
they doesn’t give you anything more than a “step”

and about satability issue… there are better way to work on it than bosu.
and a lot of them just required: you and nothing more

Bosus are very versitile. Okay - bit on the expensive side but really useful and can be used for lots of static and dynamic stability/proprioception work. Great for re hab, position sense work and core.

Try placing one flat side down, then jumping onto it 5-10 times during your warm up before doing a set of squats. To say you will feel “solid and grounded” when you squat is an understatement.

Bosu press ups (round side down) are a great way to work on benching imbalances from left to right, plus shoulder stability.

Try standing on one round side down on one leg to work on hip stabilty and to strengthen abductors and even the deep flexors of the ankle and toes. Too easy? Play med. ball catch with a buddy at the same time.

How about the stork press or stork row. round side down, stand on the bosu with one leg and perform a db press or bent over db row (unsupporterd) for a real test of balance and co-ordination. Experiment with which hand you hold the weight in to change the feel of the exercise.

Sure these exercises dont permit huge loads, but after doing them for a while - say 3 to 4 weeks - return to your regular version of the exercise and you will find technically they are much easier having done them in a very unbalanced environment, thus permitting greater loads to be handled in the traditional exercises by eliminating weak links like joint stability, balance or co-ordination.

Also, not so far to fall when you screw up!!!

Patch.

This is a declaration of how T-Nation has changed, there are tons of “fitness” wieners on the site now. Arguing about a piece of equipment that has been proven absolutely useless in several peer reviewed studies when utilized with non-rehabilitation patients. How about you guys start squatting 405 for ten before you use the BOSU, that will “work your core”.

Actually, my master’s thesis study was the first study to look at the effect of unstable surface training in healthy, trained individuals on markers of athletic performance.

I’m not agreeing or disagreeing with you; I’m just setting the record straight on what’s out there and what isn’t (more of the latter).

[quote]Clark Call wrote:
Arguing about a piece of equipment that has been proven absolutely useless in several peer reviewed studies when utilized with non-rehabilitation patients. [/quote]

Watch who you are calling a fitness weiner!!!

An intelligent trainer will look at all the tools available to improve their weakness’. Or I guess they could just suit up and let the denim take the strain! (just funnin’ ya!)

Sure, some of the “functional” crowd talk a good workout, but some of us actually have a foot in both camps and as a result are big, strong and agile, oh and pretty fit too.

Now I realise your comments weren’t meant as a personal slur, but c’mon…dont dis someone elses exercise preferences just because they aren’t identical to yours.

Minds are like parachutes - they work best when open. (always wanted to say that)

Just for the record…did 500lb double in the squat today. Wanna know something weird? No wobbles. Guess thats thanks to my fitness weiner BOSU warm up.

Patch

You guys realize this thread was started in 2001, right?

hahaha nice one Dave - didnt even spot that…!

[quote]Patch wrote:
Watch who you are calling a fitness weiner!!!
[/quote]
it hurts uhm?

i agree, but BOSU isn’t a good tool.
it does’nt give you anything that value that money. if you want to work on balance there are better solutions…

i agree… everyone has slightly different targets… but again… BOSU is useless. Do you plan to do squat over a BOSU?

which kind of help can BOSU give that a swiss ball can’t?

i don’t believe that he disagree for personal flavor… but for simple comparison of BOSU with old tool and old stability excercize…

always open mouth catch flies…

i don’t agree. try without BOSU warm up. but with a correct warm up.

At the gym I work at we offer a class based around these. Sort of like an aerobics class on half-balls. Old fat women and men crouch on them in the hopes of it “toning” their “core” and thereby making them somehow less fat and soft. BOSU’s are only a half step above the ab products you see for sale on infomercials.

Eric,

Are you able to talk about your thesis yet? I don’t remember ever hearing the results of your study.

Take care,

Ryan

Unfortunately, not yet. I’ll be defending within a month, but I can’t really disclose any information until it’s been accepted for publication in a journal. I’m guessing that’ll be in December, and it might not be published until August of next year.

[quote]Dr. Ryan wrote:
Eric,

Are you able to talk about your thesis yet? I don’t remember ever hearing the results of your study.

Take care,

Ryan[/quote]

Eric,

Ah, the waiting game. Don’t you just love it.

Best of luck with your defense and hopefully it will be picked up for publication before long.

Take care,

Ryan

The really funny thing about all the guys who are making fun of this wonderful product is, none have tried it seriously. You are all concerned about moving the largest loads.You use belts, wraps and whatever else it takes to lift the heaviest loads possible, and turn heads in the gym. If you give another training approach half a chance you would notice that the bosu is an incredible tool. Yes you do have to decrease the weight you move, but when you return to your bar bending loads, you will notice without a doubt the difference the BOSU has made for your stability, security and your strength.

[quote]makpower wrote:
The really funny thing about all the guys who are making fun of this wonderful product is, none have tried it seriously.
[/quote]
i have tried it.
i found it useless, or better, it doesn’t give nothing compared to the cost of that half-ball.

again no. i don’t use belt, wraps or hook… just lift

if i give another training approach half a change, i start training with a different target.
do you think bosu may be of any use for bodybuilder, “powerbuilder & strongman”, WL or PL?

[quote]
Yes you do have to decrease the weight you move, but when you return to your bar bending loads, you will notice without a doubt the difference the BOSU has made for your stability, security and your strength. [/quote]

have you any prove/study about that?

[quote]cadav wrote:
makpower wrote:
The really funny thing about all the guys who are making fun of this wonderful product is, none have tried it seriously.

i have tried it.
i found it useless, or better, it doesn’t give nothing compared to the cost of that half-ball.

You are all concerned about moving the largest loads.You use belts, wraps and whatever else it takes to lift the heaviest loads possible, and turn heads in the gym.

again no. i don’t use belt, wraps or hook… just lift

If you give another training approach half a chance you would notice that the bosu is an incredible tool.

if i give another training approach half a change, i start training with a different target.
do you think bosu may be of any use for bodybuilder, “powerbuilder & strongman”, WL or PL?[/quote]

I agree, powerlifters, and bodybuilders would gain little to nothing on a bosu. However athletes, such as hockey players, football player, athletes who have to produce strength in a dynamic and often off balanced position would would benefit from the use of the BOSU.

[quote]

Yes you do have to decrease the weight you move, but when you return to your bar bending loads, you will notice without a doubt the difference the BOSU has made for your stability, security and your strength.

have you any prove/study about that?[/quote]

I was training with the bosu for 5 months soild. Now I am training for a strongman competition. I have given up the bosu training b/c I recognize the fact that the same amount of weight cannot be used on it, however I was squating 275lbs on the bosu (dome down) and now I’m squating 305 with no problem. I feel very confident, and I notice a difference in how stable I feel with the weight on my back.

As of right now I am unable to fine any research to back up my experience.

Just a thought. Peter Twist of twist conditioning is responsible for training the Vancouver Canucks. His training consists of alot of bosu, stability agility training. If it was a useless product would a NHL hockey team really pay money to train with it?

basing the effectiveness and efficiency of a training methodology on what sports teams or athletes use it isn’t always the best of ideas. Just ask a former Penn State football player about his experiences with their S&C. Better yet, take a look at the training practices of arguably the greatest NFL player ever, Jerry Rice.