T Nation

Books! What are You Reading?

Hey,

I was wondering what books you guys are reading. Chris Shugart mentioned Fountainhead in his writing, and as result now I’m hooked on all things Ayn Rand. Currently I’m reading The Fountainhead, which will be followed by Atlas Shrugged. I also plan to read Pultarch’s Lives. So let’s hear it, what are you guys reading?

Gotrek and Felix: The First Omnibus (collects the first three books)

Just finished Mechanicum.

On Deck: Heroes of the Imperium

In the hole: Gotrek and Felix: The Second Omnibus

Kinda on a Warhammer kick. Also, torrenting a bunch of computer science texts used at the local university. Hopefully getting in to get my BS in CS this summer. Get out of sales.

Just finished Heretics of Dune and Huge in a Hurry

On deck: Ghost Rider by Neil Peart

Just finished Twilight. If anyone mentions the name Edward Cullen near me again, I just might rip my ears off my head.

[quote]Invictica wrote:
Hey,

I was wondering what books you guys are reading. Chris Shugart mentioned Fountainhead in his writing, and as result now I’m hooked on all things Ayn Rand. Currently I’m reading The Fountainhead, which will be followed by Atlas Shrugged. I also plan to read Pultarch’s Lives. So let’s hear it, what are you guys reading? [/quote]

Ouch. I feel bad for you.

I’m reading “Team of Rivals”, that incredible book about Lincoln.

“The Boxing Scene”, by Thomas Hauser, which is one of the best books on boxing that I’ve ever read.

“American Lion” about Andrew Jackson.

and finally

“Stree E&E”, a book by Marc Macyoung about getting out of hard spots in the street.

I recently finished “What is the What” by Dave Eggers, and it solidifies my contention that he’s the greatest living writer, and certainly the best of our generation.

I just started reading the twilight series

Eifelheim–Michael Flynn
Algebra & Trigonometry w/ Graphing Utilities, 5th Edition–Sullivan

A Thousand Splendid Suns - Khaled Hosseini

Just finished:
Wasted - Marya Hornbacher
Shantaram - Gregory David Roberts

Brock Biology of Microorganisms;
Vertebrate Dissection;
Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates;
Organic Chemistry;

That’s pretty much all I have time for…

That and trolling forums.

Human Development - 11th Edition

The West: Encounters & Transformations - 2nd Edition

A Survey of Mathmatics with Applications (Expanded Edition)

yeah…i dont read for fun.

Twilight series is ok, second book annoys the f’ out of me in parts.

Currently: The Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula LeGuin

Also currently: Oracle High Performance Tuning - Gavin Powell (extremely exciting stuff my friends…)

Past two weeks:

American Gods - Neil Gaiman
A Fistful of Diamonds - John B. Robinson
Love in the Time of Fridges - Tim Scott
A River Runs Through It - Norman Maclean (for about the 30th time)
Farentheit 451 - Ray Bradbury (ump-teenth time)

On Deck:

Helix - Eric Brown
Terror - Dan Simmons

(whichever one is closest when I reach for it)

Currently - “Assignation Vacation” - Sarah Vowell

Next - Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Just finished “Room Full of mirrors” about hendrix, and “can’t buy me love” about the beatles.

Just finished Deception Point (Dan Brown )
and now The Apeal ( John Grisham )

The Sword of Truth Series

IMO Terry Goodkind is one of the greatest fantasy authors this world has ever known, amazing books.

they hold a special place in my heart. I started reading them at 12 and it took him until this year to finish the series, 9 books in all.

Took me 7 years to read them all, good times.

I’d also suggest if you are a fantasy reader anything by David Gemmell, awesome author.

My screenname on here, Waylanderxx, actually stems from one of his books, “waylander”. One of my all time favorites. I have read and re-read all of his books many times.

[quote]waylanderxx wrote:
IMO Terry Goodkind is one of the greatest fantasy authors this world has ever known, amazing books.
[/quote]

Waylander - Check out Neil Gaiman’s stuff. He’s collaborated with and is close friends with Terry Goodkind.

Great authors, both.

Recently read
“The Road”
and
“Into The Wild”

Vietnamese Women at War

I kid you not…

Damn the history classes.

And btw reading Ayn Rand right now might make you choke when you watch the news.

I’ve been reading this book called “Einstein’s Dreams” by Alan Lightman. It’s pretty cool; it makes you think about the way you spend time and live your life.

I haven’t read any non-fiction lately, so skip this if you’re not looking for fiction.

Recently, I’ve read six or so of the Harry Dresden books by Jim Butcher. A modern-day, rebellious wizard in Chicago assists police to battle supernatural enemies.

They’re alright, not great but certainly not bad either. Pulp entertainment novels that serve their purpose.

Anathem by Neal Stephenson. Secluded monks struggle to cooperate with secular forces against a shared enemy in a recovering post-Apocalyptic Earth-like setting.

This one depends greatly on whether or not you like Stephenson. If you do (and I do), Anathem is excellent. If you don’t, you probably won’t be able to finish it.

Divine Justice by David Baldacci. A fugitive from U.S. federal agents seeks refuge in a small West Virginia town that is not as innocent as it seems.

I thought the story was unremarkable and unimaginative, the characters were thin and poorly developed, and the writing was clunky. Other than that, I guess I’d call it average.

Steven Erickson’s Malazan Tales of the Fallen series through Book Six: The Bonehunters. An sprawling empire struggles to fulfill the vision of its fallen emperor in a world thrown into chaos by ancient forces.

Erickson does a great job of carrying out grandiose, sweeping plotlines despite keeping the direct focus on the gritty, day-to-day survival of individual characters. I thought Book 5: Midnight Tides was underwhelming, but the other books thus far have been excellent. Erickson maintains a very interesting balance between vulnerable mortals, and ground-shaking immortals.

I’m currently reading Thirteen by Richard K. Morgan. Law enforcement in the splintered remains of the United States enlist the services of a genetically altered, sociopathic “thirteen” to track down a series of murders thought to be committed by another “thirteen” variant.

I haven’t finished it yet, so I won’t comment much. The story thus far is inviting, and the book is well-written, but there’s a certain undertone to it that I find unappealing. I’m curious to see if it improves by the end of the book.