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Books on Sprinting

Does anyone have any book/article recommendations for sprinting?

I don’t want to become a “sprinter”, I just want to lean out a bit through sprinting. In other words, I am a beginner to sprinting.

Thanks,
Pambele

[quote]Pambele wrote:
Does anyone have any book/article recommendations for sprinting?

I don’t want to become a “sprinter”, I just want to lean out a bit through sprinting. In other words, I am a beginner to sprinting.

Thanks,
Pambele[/quote]

Head over to charliefrancis.com

Take a look through the forums. If anything, I would recommend the GPP dvd and CFTS. Those should get you started in the right direction.

I love this site

http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/sprints/index.htm

This book explains the Sprint 8 workout:
http://www.amazon.com/Ready-Set-Synergy-Fitness-2nd

[quote]Pambele wrote:
Does anyone have any book/article recommendations for sprinting?

I don’t want to become a “sprinter”, I just want to lean out a bit through sprinting. In other words, I am a beginner to sprinting.

Thanks,
Pambele[/quote]

If you just want to use sprinting to lean out a bit, do you really need a book? Just go out there and run.

The Charlie Francis stuff would probably be counterproductive as it’s geared on developing a fast 100m, not on getting in shape and leaning down, which would be a different program.

[quote]medic33 wrote:
This book explains the Sprint 8 workout:
http://www.amazon.com/Ready-Set-Synergy-Fitness-2nd[/quote]

Medic, the link didn’t work for me.

Thanks,
Pambele

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
If you just want to use sprinting to lean out a bit, do you really need a book? Just go out there and run.
[/quote]

You make a good point, and I have been doing exactly that for the past two months or so, but I think I need a bit more structure around my sprinting workouts and I could also learn better technique - I have developed shin splints and they’ve gotten really bad…

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:

The Charlie Francis stuff would probably be counterproductive as it’s geared on developing a fast 100m, not on getting in shape and leaning down, which would be a different program.
[/quote]

I don’t think Ive ever seen someone who worked on running a solid 100m that didnt get in shape as a result.

[quote]Pambele wrote:

You make a good point, and I have been doing exactly that for the past two months or so, but I think I need a bit more structure around my sprinting workouts and I could also learn better technique - I have developed shin splints and they’ve gotten really bad…[/quote]

Technique has little to do with shin sprints, unless of course you’re landing on your heels when you run, which you shouldn’t be. In order to get this problem in check, you will have to back off on the running for now and prepare your lower legs for the forces encountered during sprints. In order to do that, I would do something like this:

Session 1
-Isometric Calf Raises at both extreme ranges of motion
3 sets of 20 seconds
-Lateral Speed Line Hops (2 feet, then progress to 1)
3 sets of 15-25 seconds

Session 2
-Eccentric Calf Raises (up with 2, down with 1)
3 sets of 3 per leg
-6" Box Hops (Hop onto and off of a box as fast as possible. Start with 2 feet, progress to 1)
3 sets of 15-25 seconds

Session 3
-Straight Leg Altitude Landings (hop off a low box and try to absorb the fall with your calves. Progress to a higher box and then to 1 foot.)
4 sets of 3-4 drops
-Lateral Speed Line Hops (as above)
3 sets of 15-20 seconds
Add 1 of these sessions to each day you weight train your lower body. Do them 1 at a time. Once you become proficient at all the exercises your calf troubles should be gone and you’ll be able to return to sprinting pain free. This should take a couple of months, but it’ll be worth it.

RJ

[quote]RJ24 wrote:

-Isometric Calf Raises at both extreme ranges of motion

RJ[/quote]

Rj’s advice was good, but I think isometric calf raises are useless from a running standpoint. I doubt it will take 2 months to get rid of them if you just rest, then again I don’t know how severe your case is.

I’d also make sure you are flexible in your legs, especially below the knee. I had shin splints so I started really focusing on flexiblity while resting and they went away. Good luck.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
Pambele wrote:
Does anyone have any book/article recommendations for sprinting?

I don’t want to become a “sprinter”, I just want to lean out a bit through sprinting. In other words, I am a beginner to sprinting.

Thanks,
Pambele

If you just want to use sprinting to lean out a bit, do you really need a book? Just go out there and run.

The Charlie Francis stuff would probably be counterproductive as it’s geared on developing a fast 100m, not on getting in shape and leaning down, which would be a different program.
[/quote]

The program is structured; The GPP laid out doesn’t have to be geared towards 100m sprinters. The volume can be adjusted accordingly for anyone. And if you are training for sprints, you are going to get lean regardless. Have you ever seen a top sprinter that WASN’T ? Check out the GPP DVD if you’re curious and see what I mean.

[quote]Pambele wrote:
jtrinsey wrote:
If you just want to use sprinting to lean out a bit, do you really need a book? Just go out there and run.

You make a good point, and I have been doing exactly that for the past two months or so, but I think I need a bit more structure around my sprinting workouts and I could also learn better technique - I have developed shin splints and they’ve gotten really bad…[/quote]

Regards to shin splints. You may have to do your sprint work on grass. Running on a hard surface will take it’s toll on your lower limbs eventually.

As far as learning technique, hills are a great tool- They teach proper forward lean for starting mechanics and also take some stress off of the hamstrings.

Stick to grass for a while and keep icing those shins. Work on strengthening your anterior tibilais muscles which are often neglected by most if not all athletes.

I wouldn’t really want to be doing altitude drops absorbing the force with your calf if you have shin splints; could aggravate them even more!

I will second the charliefrancis.com suggestion, it has something for everyone involved in running. By the way WRCortese usually gives some pretty good advice over there.

[quote]Kreal7 wrote:
RJ24 wrote:

-Isometric Calf Raises at both extreme ranges of motion

RJ

Rj’s advice was good, but I think isometric calf raises are useless from a running standpoint. I doubt it will take 2 months to get rid of them if you just rest, then again I don’t know how severe your case is.

I’d also make sure you are flexible in your legs, especially below the knee. I had shin splints so I started really focusing on flexiblity while resting and they went away. Good luck.[/quote]

The calf raises don’t help much if you have strong calves naturally, or if you’re light, but for most people, they need to build some serious strength in the lower legs before moving onto extremely stressful things like sprinting.

And I was not talking about 2 months to get rid of the shin splints. I meant it would take 2-3 months to bring his power absorbtion within his lower legs up to par before he could really start running in high volumes pain free. For the average gym rat, both strength and power within the calves needs to be trained, otherwise they’ll be a weak link during all forms of power work.

You have to remember, you can’t transfer the power of your hips to the ground effectively if your shock absorbers (calves) are about as stiff as sponges.

RJ

Also, I forgot to mention that you should wait for your shin splints to clear up before you start following my advice. There’s no reason to stress the area further until it’s pain free.

RJ

[quote]WRcortese5 wrote:

"…if you are training for sprints, you are going to get lean regardless. Have you ever seen a top sprinter that WASN’T ? [/quote]

I disagree.

Of course “top” sprinters may be lean but it is totally illogical to assert a generalisation that sprinting therefore makes you lean.

I am afraid that you are simply associating the fact that successful sprinters are lean (and of course young)and drawing a causal connection.

Of course you do not want to carry extra weight as as a sprinter and so you would expect successful sprinters to be lean.

However, there are a number of older adult sprinters at my local track who are not that lean simply because they do not expend sufficent calories.

As further evidence plenty of soccer players at various levels carry more body fat than you might expect given the time they spend sprinting.

Successful sprinting requires low body fat. It dose not necessarily cause it.

[quote]WRCortese5 wrote:
Have you ever seen a top sprinter that WASN’T ?
[/quote]

Ever seen a good power forward that wasn’t tall?

I understand what you are trying to say and also understand that what I said is a bit of an exaggeration. HOWEVER, the fact that the best sprinters are ripped is, in my opinion, not due to their sprint programs.

Is following CFTS one of the best ways to improve your sprint times? Without a doubt! Are there better ways of using sprinting to lean out? Definitly.

Intensive tempo is a much better method for fat loss then fully rested flying 30s. I don’t have CFTS (only an avid CF forum lurker), but I’m guessing there’s not a whole lot of intensive tempo?

“Sport Speed” by George Dintiman and Bob Ward is a good book, and it goes into detail on improving functional strength through Oly and PL movements, in addition to the track work.

[quote]peterm533 wrote:
WRcortese5 wrote:

"…if you are training for sprints, you are going to get lean regardless. Have you ever seen a top sprinter that WASN’T ?

I disagree.

Of course “top” sprinters may be lean but it is totally illogical to assert a generalisation that sprinting therefore makes you lean.

I am afraid that you are simply associating the fact that successful sprinters are lean (and of course young)and drawing a causal connection.

Of course you do not want to carry extra weight as as a sprinter and so you would expect successful sprinters to be lean.

However, there are a number of older adult sprinters at my local track who are not that lean simply because they do not expend sufficent calories.

As further evidence plenty of soccer players at various levels carry more body fat than you might expect given the time they spend sprinting.

Successful sprinting requires low body fat. It dose not necessarily cause it. [/quote]

If I came off as asserting that, that was not my intention. I simply feel that the type of training that a 100-400m sprinter would do would help in acheiving a more lean look while preserving the muscle mass that he was after. After all, long continuous runnning isn’t muscle friendly.

If you are doing 2-3 speed sessions per week with the additional low intensity work, weights, etc then I feel you are going to see some very positive body composition changes. And yes, sprinting will not just automatically make you lean, but over time sticking to a plan or something similar will gear you in the right direction.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
WRCortese5 wrote:
Have you ever seen a top sprinter that WASN’T ?

Ever seen a good power forward that wasn’t tall?

I understand what you are trying to say and also understand that what I said is a bit of an exaggeration. HOWEVER, the fact that the best sprinters are ripped is, in my opinion, not due to their sprint programs.

Is following CFTS one of the best ways to improve your sprint times? Without a doubt! Are there better ways of using sprinting to lean out? Definitly.

Intensive tempo is a much better method for fat loss then fully rested flying 30s. I don’t have CFTS (only an avid CF forum lurker), but I’m guessing there’s not a whole lot of intensive tempo?[/quote]

I agree with what you said. I was not suggesting that he follow the entire GPP format to the T, but that he take a look and adjust to what he feels would be best suited to his goals. Nothing wrong with improving sprint speed as a byproduct of training in my opinion, even as a recreational athlete.