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BoneGrowth

I did some searches but could not find any concrete info about this. What can one expect with regards to bone growth?

I’m pretty sure that I’m as tall as I’ll ever be, 6’4 and 21 years old. I’ve been 6’4 for about 4 years, and I don’t expect to put on anymore height(and I’m fine with that), but what about my face and my hands and feet?

I have read they keep growing and developing(at the bone level) basically all through your life. Is there a time when I can expect to see changes there, some average age?

Furthermore, will weight training affect the development of the bones? assuming I haven’t reached my peak height(doubtful, but still) would weight training affect anything?

Also, I have read conflicting information about bone size, as in width. A lot of people talk about being ‘big boned’, but I have read that really, within a small margin, all our bones are about the same widths, and when someone is ‘big boned’ it is usually tendon size. Is this true? how big of a range is bone width amongst adult males?

[quote]Malevolence wrote:
A lot of people talk about being ‘big boned’, but I have read that really, within a small margin, all our bones are about the same widths, and when someone is ‘big boned’ it is usually tendon size. Is this true? how big of a range is bone width amongst adult males? [/quote]

When people say “big boned”, they generally mean the width of the skeleton - shoulder width, width of the pelvis - rather than bone thickness. You just have to take a look around to see that there are large variations in those measurements among people of same gender and similar height.

Coincidentally, we just so happened to have covered this topic in Nutrition class today(completely unbeknownst to me that we would).

Our text said that Men typically reach their adult height by age 17 or 18, but for the rest of their lives their bones will be fine tuning themselves, in density, width and structure(with regards to the face). Nothing drastic changes after the age of 21 or so(average), at least not compared to the drastic puberty related developments. But, subtle restructuring and modification does occur over time.

The text also said that weight training stimulated bone development with regards to this fine tuning.

It didn’t say much about the average width of people’s bones though.

Just in case anyone was interested.

Unless all that information was false, it was basically straight from my textbook on nutrition.

[quote]larryb wrote:
Malevolence wrote:
A lot of people talk about being ‘big boned’, but I have read that really, within a small margin, all our bones are about the same widths, and when someone is ‘big boned’ it is usually tendon size. Is this true? how big of a range is bone width amongst adult males?

When people say “big boned”, they generally mean the width of the skeleton - shoulder width, width of the pelvis - rather than bone thickness. You just have to take a look around to see that there are large variations in those measurements among people of same gender and similar height.[/quote]

Yeah, there is clearly a larger variation with the overall frame of a person. I’m 6’4 and thin but I have a big frame, it’s just empty. However, wouldn’t some of those measurements, like chest width, be directly related to the length of the rib-bones?

I guess the pelvic bone is the only one that would have to be clearly bigger all around and not just longer, but even then, I’d wager there really isn’t that enormous of a variation between pelvic bones, despite appearances making us think there are. I could be completely off base though, I’m curious if anyone has more concrete information.

I’ve always been very interested in the possibility of bone growth. Mostly because mine are to small. Archeologists like to generalize bone size when they are analyzing old bones to determine the era the skeleton came from. And they usually generalize that all men had about the same size for each period. But it is painfully obvious all men are not even close to being created equally when it comes to bone size. And no I’m not talking about that bone, but the same applies.

IMO the wrists, hands, and feet are the most obvious places to see extreme differences in bone size. Mens wrists vary from 6.5 inches to 8.5 inches. If you’ve ever compared a persons hands and wrists from a 6.5 inch to a person that has 8.5 inch wrists it is incredibly dramatic. Another thing you notice is guys with thick wrists and hands typically have a real easy time having large upper arms also. Some argue smaller wrists are better because it makes the upper arm look bigger. And there are many small wristed body builders with great upper arms. But in general I’d much rather have the thick bone structure.

Mine have definetly grown over time. They were barely 6.5 inches in high school at age 17 and now at 34 are right at 7 inches. Ye I kind of obsessed over measurements in high school. I blame it on Arnold’s ecyclopedia of bodybuilding. That’s probably typical of most people to have some bone growth as they age. And some may be due to Growth Hormone being released more with excersise.

And then there is always the addition of HGH. There are many anecdotal reports of people adding a great deal of bone density on even a short 6 month cycle of GH. And it’s pretty obvious from the users that are pro by looking at their facial features it adds density. I wish it was legal and wasn’t so expensive. I’d be all over that.

[quote]AverageJay wrote:
IMO the wrists, hands, and feet are the most obvious places to see extreme differences in bone size. Mens wrists vary from 6.5 inches to 8.5 inches.[/quote]

All of my bones, including wrists, are thin except for the hand and finger bones.

[quote]AverageJay wrote:
IMO the wrists, hands, and feet are the most obvious places to see extreme differences in bone size. Mens wrists vary from 6.5 inches to 8.5 inches. If you’ve ever compared a persons hands and wrists from a 6.5 inch to a person that has 8.5 inch wrists it is incredibly dramatic. [/quote]

My experience has been different. I’ve seen people with wrists that are like my calves, and it is monstrous and insane. But when you REALLY look at it. It’s not bone size, it’s just more mass around the bone.

There is no doubt some variation, but I do not believe it is at all as big as 2 inches for BONE size, on average. Skin, tendons, muscles…etc. all have a role in the measurements.

There are some freaks out there with agromeglia[sp?) who literally have enormous bones compared to the rest of the world. But they are very few and far between.

I still don’t think there is all that much variation at the bone level with width/thickness.

But, I’d like to hear some more information on this subject.

I just pulled out a tape measure and my wrists are just shy of 8" and I’d consider my wrists to be skinny. But then again, I’ve got a 6’7" wingspan and large hands so I guess it’s all relative.

Once the growth plates close the only thing that will change will be slight variations in bone width and density. This will be dependent on things like diet, stress, exercise which is ofcourse a form of stress. Enviomental and hormonal factors also play a role.

Some anabolics actually leach calcium out of your bones and decrease skeletal density, others enhance it. Which brings an interesting point to light. Given peoples different body chemistrys sp? some users gain a good ammount of bone density and some bone thickness through their use of anabolics. They may not even realise how much of their weight is attributed to increased skeletal mass and not just soft tissue like muscle.

[quote]Malevolence wrote:

My experience has been different. I’ve seen people with wrists that are like my calves, and it is monstrous and insane. But when you REALLY look at it. It’s not bone size, it’s just more mass around the bone.

There is no doubt some variation, but I do not believe it is at all as big as 2 inches for BONE size, on average. Skin, tendons, muscles…etc. all have a role in the measurements.

There are some freaks out there with agromeglia[sp?) who literally have enormous bones compared to the rest of the world. But they are very few and far between.

I still don’t think there is all that much variation at the bone level with width/thickness.

But, I’d like to hear some more information on this subject. [/quote]

Here’s an interesting study:

Notice this little blurb in the conclusion:

" These findings support prior studies suggesting that milk intake is an important factor in increasing bone density and bone size in young adults."

I’m sure there are many more out there. But I don’t think the overall difference in girth between peoples wrists, hands, fingers, feet, ect. can be explained by tendonds and other tissues alone anymore than someones greater height can be explained by that. If having longer, taller bones is easy to contribute to bone density and size, why is bone thickness and overall girth any different??