T Nation

Bodybuilding's 30 Biggest Lies


#1

http://gain-muscle-now.com/bodybuildingmyths/bodybuildings-30-biggest-lies

What do YOU think?


#2

Same shit u here everyday


#3

Nothing new… nice piece to print out and give to newbs though.

S


#4

Every time i hear the words “low-fat” advocated anywhere i die a little inside


#5

I think some of it is bullshit and overly simplistic…like this:

[quote]You see it happen every day in gyms across the country. Some bodybuilding neophyte will walk up to a guy who looks like he�??s an escaped attraction from Jurassic Park and ask him how he trains.

The biggest guy in the gym likely got that way from either taking a tremendous amount of drugs and/or by being genetically pre-dispositioned to get big. Follow a horse home and you�??ll find horse parents.

The guy in your gym who is best bodybuilder is the guy who has made the most progress and done the most to his physique using natural techniques. He may still be a pencil neck, but he may have put on 40 pounds [19kg] of lean body mass to get where he is, and that, in all probability, took some know-how.

That person probably doesn�??t overtrain, keeps his sets down to a minimum, and uses great form and concentration on the eccentric (negative) portion of each exercise repetition.[/quote]

This is the same crap you hear everyday as if someone who is big simply got that way without trying because of genetics and that the smaller guy somehow shows more dedication.

The only people who would write something like that…are people who have seen such little progress that they attribute anyone doing better to drug use and genetics.

You aren’t going to know a thing about how far someone has gone from start to finish without actually speaking with them. It is ridiculous the numbers of people who think if you are big now, that you must have always been big.

If you want to be one of the big guys, it may just help to find out how they got that way instead of writing it all off as if they didn’t have to work for it.


#6

This guy seems to be very anti bulking also, I wonder how he looks.

Also “elite bodybuilders are the last people in the world you want to turn to for bodybuilding advice” hilarious…


#7

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I think some of it is bullshit and overly simplistic…like this:

You see it happen every day in gyms across the country. Some bodybuilding neophyte will walk up to a guy who looks like he�??s an escaped attraction from Jurassic Park and ask him how he trains.

The biggest guy in the gym likely got that way from either taking a tremendous amount of drugs and/or by being genetically pre-dispositioned to get big. Follow a horse home and you�??ll find horse parents.

The guy in your gym who is best bodybuilder is the guy who has made the most progress and done the most to his physique using natural techniques. He may still be a pencil neck, but he may have put on 40 pounds [19kg] of lean body mass to get where he is, and that, in all probability, took some know-how.

That person probably doesn�??t overtrain, keeps his sets down to a minimum, and uses great form and concentration on the eccentric (negative) portion of each exercise repetition.

This is the same crap you hear everyday as if someone who is big simply got that way without trying because of genetics and that the smaller guy somehow shows more dedication.

The only people who would write something like that…are people who have seen such little progress that they attribute anyone doing better to drug use and genetics.

You aren’t going to know a thing about how far someone has gone from start to finish without actually speaking with them. It is ridiculous the numbers of people who think if you are big now, that you must have always been big.

If you want to be one of the big guys, it may just help to find out how they got that way instead of writing it all off as if they didn’t have to work for it.[/quote]

Well put good point…


#8

I want to see a pic of him


#9

[quote]shizen wrote:
This guy seems to be very anti bulking also, I wonder how he looks.

Also “elite bodybuilders are the last people in the world you want to turn to for bodybuilding advice” hilarious… [/quote]
o
Well, it does seem true that they can get away with a lot diet and training wise that others can’t. Don’t yu ever wonder why newbies read a pro’s supposed “workout” in a muscle mag and try it with little results?

Further, if I ate what some of the pros eat during the off season, it would most likely not work for me.

But this is just pros we’re talking about. The big guy at the gym with a 9-5 job could probably offer great advice, and in my experience, many have.


#10

[quote]abcd1234 wrote:
Don’t yu ever wonder why newbies read a pro’s supposed “workout” in a muscle mag and try it with little results? Further, if I ate what some of the pros eat during the off season, it would most likely not work for me.

[/quote]

Do you think that the pros are writing that stuff about themselves?

Here’s an excerpt from a Ronnie Coleman article on biceps training

[quote]Based on the preceding thought, I came to the conclusion that cable work provided the required dual facilities of isolating the biceps while allowing them to be under constant stress throughout the completion of each set. The latter element is particularly difficult to attain during the negative (descending) part of each rep. This is where cables score heavily.

With cables, you can maintain muscular stress during the negative phase to an extent that is not mechanically possible with free weights.[/quote]

Now no offense to the guy… but ever hear him talk in his DVDs? lol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lr76Rj0etc&feature=related

Have a good hard look at some of the real writers for those magazines and then make some judgments on why the routines and diets don’t pan out for most.


#11

[quote]abcd1234 wrote:
shizen wrote:
This guy seems to be very anti bulking also, I wonder how he looks.

Also “elite bodybuilders are the last people in the world you want to turn to for bodybuilding advice” hilarious…
o
Well, it does seem true that they can get away with a lot diet and training wise that others can’t. Don’t yu ever wonder why newbies read a pro’s supposed “workout” in a muscle mag and try it with little results?

Further, if I ate what some of the pros eat during the off season, it would most likely not work for me.

But this is just pros we’re talking about. The big guy at the gym with a 9-5 job could probably offer great advice, and in my experience, many have. [/quote]

You shouldn’t mimic their exact workout, but the are more then qualified to give you advice that will work for you. They have been bodybuilding for 10+ years, much of which was probably done without assistance and they are the best of the best.

Those are definitely the people I do want giving me advice. They most likely will not advise you do exactly what they do-that would be crazy, most of their workouts would cripple an average trainer-.


#12

[quote]shizen wrote:
This guy seems to be very anti bulking also, I wonder how he looks.

Also “elite bodybuilders are the last people in the world you want to turn to for bodybuilding advice” hilarious… [/quote]

Riiiight…

Just like elite basketball players are the last people in the world you want to take basketball advice from. Or successful business people are the last people you want to take business advice from. /sarcasm


#13

[quote]Scott M wrote:
abcd1234 wrote:
Don’t yu ever wonder why newbies read a pro’s supposed “workout” in a muscle mag and try it with little results? Further, if I ate what some of the pros eat during the off season, it would most likely not work for me.

Do you think that the pros are writing that stuff about themselves?

Here’s an excerpt from a Ronnie Coleman article on biceps training

Based on the preceding thought, I came to the conclusion that cable work provided the required dual facilities of isolating the biceps while allowing them to be under constant stress throughout the completion of each set. The latter element is particularly difficult to attain during the negative (descending) part of each rep. This is where cables score heavily.

With cables, you can maintain muscular stress during the negative phase to an extent that is not mechanically possible with free weights.

Now no offense to the guy… but ever hear him talk in his DVDs? lol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lr76Rj0etc&feature=related

Have a good hard look at some of the real writers for those magazines and then make some judgments on why the routines and diets don’t pan out for most. [/quote]

i found this comment on that coleman video

“erm can someone please message me and tell me the truth about working out shortens your dick becuz i been working out for bout 3 years and i do not think it does but i wanna know the truth fanx if its tru hes got a wunder”

has anyone had their penis disappear yet ?


#14

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
shizen wrote:
This guy seems to be very anti bulking also, I wonder how he looks.

Also “elite bodybuilders are the last people in the world you want to turn to for bodybuilding advice” hilarious…

Riiiight…

Just like elite basketball players are the last people in the world you want to take basketball advice from. Or successful business people are the last people you want to take business advice from. /sarcasm[/quote]

Bodybuilding is the only activity where that stupidity is actually promoted. Would it make any sense for people to say the following, “I know you want to be in the Olympics one day…so you should avoid listening to other people who have actually reached the Olympic Games and only listen to people who try to compete there but never actually get good enough…everyone in the games is either just genetically gifted or on drugs.”?

If I want to be the best at something, I talk to and listen to the best. I don’t run after those who have achieved the least with some false belief that they somehow worked harder.

This is becoming the little man’s cry for attention…and it got real pathetic a long time ago.


#15

Well, there was some good advice in there, and I will give him some respect for telling the average people to start doing the complex moves.


#16

[quote]Scott M wrote:
abcd1234 wrote:
Don’t yu ever wonder why newbies read a pro’s supposed “workout” in a muscle mag and try it with little results? Further, if I ate what some of the pros eat during the off season, it would most likely not work for me.

Do you think that the pros are writing that stuff about themselves?

Here’s an excerpt from a Ronnie Coleman article on biceps training

Based on the preceding thought, I came to the conclusion that cable work provided the required dual facilities of isolating the biceps while allowing them to be under constant stress throughout the completion of each set. The latter element is particularly difficult to attain during the negative (descending) part of each rep. This is where cables score heavily.

With cables, you can maintain muscular stress during the negative phase to an extent that is not mechanically possible with free weights.

Now no offense to the guy… but ever hear him talk in his DVDs? lol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lr76Rj0etc&feature=related

Have a good hard look at some of the real writers for those magazines and then make some judgments on why the routines and diets don’t pan out for most. [/quote]

You know Scott, I read through Ronnie’s book (“Hardcore”) and the first thing that I thought was: “This was NOT written by Ronnie.”

It’s not that I don’t believe that he could write in such a way, it’s just that most of what’s in there isn’t what he does in any of his vids (especially the advice on how to do the exercises and such).

It sounds like it was written by some strength coach dude who had Ronnie’s program in front of him and made the rest up, or copied it from some stupid exercise instruction book.

All the “keep your elbows at your side while curling and do not move anything other than your forearms, go for a complete range of motion, squeeze at the top and squeeze at the bottom for 1 or 2 sec each” kinda bullcrap…

It also had very little info on Ronnie’s origins, just some short version of his bio.

Arnold’s encyclopedia of modern bbing (second edition?) was way more interesting in every aspect…

Real shame actually, I was looking forward to read some of what Ronnie thinks, it seems like such an insult to Ronnie himself that the whole thing was more or less ghost written.

I mean, it’s not some fucking magazine article, it’s supposed to be Ronnie’s book, dammit.

/end rant


#17

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I think some of it is bullshit and overly simplistic…like this:

You see it happen every day in gyms across the country. Some bodybuilding neophyte will walk up to a guy who looks like he�??s an escaped attraction from Jurassic Park and ask him how he trains.

The biggest guy in the gym likely got that way from either taking a tremendous amount of drugs and/or by being genetically pre-dispositioned to get big. Follow a horse home and you�??ll find horse parents.

The guy in your gym who is best bodybuilder is the guy who has made the most progress and done the most to his physique using natural techniques. He may still be a pencil neck, but he may have put on 40 pounds [19kg] of lean body mass to get where he is, and that, in all probability, took some know-how.

That person probably doesn�??t overtrain, keeps his sets down to a minimum, and uses great form and concentration on the eccentric (negative) portion of each exercise repetition.

This is the same crap you hear everyday as if someone who is big simply got that way without trying because of genetics and that the smaller guy somehow shows more dedication.

The only people who would write something like that…are people who have seen such little progress that they attribute anyone doing better to drug use and genetics.

You aren’t going to know a thing about how far someone has gone from start to finish without actually speaking with them. It is ridiculous the numbers of people who think if you are big now, that you must have always been big.

If you want to be one of the big guys, it may just help to find out how they got that way instead of writing it all off as if they didn’t have to work for it.[/quote]

“The guy in your gym who is best bodybuilder is the guy who has made the most progress and done the most to his physique using natural techniques. He may still be a pencil neck, but he may have put on 40 pounds [19kg] of lean body mass to get where he is, and that, in all probability, took some know-how.”

That is such total BULLSHIT, as if a total gain of 19 Kg were any kind of achievement!
You gain that much within a few months or a year of training.
The journey gets vastly more difficult AFTER that…

And if you look like some pencil necked geek, then no matter where you started, you are not yet a bodybuilder, you are a beginner.

That is exactly the same as people saying: “Oh, he benches 800 pounds, but he also weighs 308 pounds, so it’s not as impressive as some small guy benching 400.”
Getting to benching 400 is the “easy” part…
There is no one benching 800 who didn’t need to get big in order to be able to do it, but the “let’s make it all relative” people don’t get it.

/end of second rant today


#18

[quote]brancron wrote:
http://gain-muscle-now.com/bodybuildingmyths/bodybuildings-30-biggest-lies

What do YOU think?[/quote]

in #2 when it said: “So much for the eat-big-to-get-big philosophy”, i said to myself “so much for this article”


#19

[quote]Scott M wrote:
abcd1234 wrote:

Now no offense to the guy… but ever hear him talk in his DVDs? lol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lr76Rj0etc&feature=related

Have a good hard look at some of the real writers for those magazines and then make some judgments on why the routines and diets don’t pan out for most. [/quote]

Damn, looks like the skin can barely contain those biceps. Asking the biggest guy in your gym for advice is good, just because everybody was a beginner, and they will most likely tell you what they did when they started out, or were at your stage.

If they are naturally that big, then they will probably say so and then you do not have to worry about it. Most big guys that I have talked to are fairly humble and do not mind talking about what they have done in the past to get to where they are.


#20

Yo guys pay attention, who wrote this article? Looks to me (im actually prety ue) it was writtena by a supplement company’s writer, look at the tip about building muscle in an under maintainence caloric intake…