T Nation

Body Punching


#1

What are the best ways to hit a body shot for maximum power and connection? I'm trying to do a study on the best body punches and how they do/did it.

elbow-hip connection?
hitting specific spots?
digging/pushing the punch?
whats yours?


#2

The best body punchers, or best body punches?

In regards to hitting the body it depends on arena of application and intention of the punch.

If you are punching to the body in a sporting context wherein you fight multiple rounds, and grappling is outlawed (like boxing or kickboxing), then “ice picking/ripping” your punches (basically imaging you are trying to chip off a piece of your opponent’s body, or that you have claws like Wolverine and are going to slash your opponent’s abdomen) to the ribs can over time start to cause bruising and tissue damage to the intercostals and other muscle of the abdominal region which can impede breathing as the rounds wear on. This can also damage the ribs themselves, which again will make breathing more difficult and painful. Once this occurs stamina will be significantly affected and often it will lead to the hands dropping and head being easier to hit.

This is not a great method of body punching if grappling is allowed and you are fighting a skilled grappler or you want to drop someone with a single shot or cause internal damage though. In those situation you are better off “driving/sticking” your punches (basically imagine your fist is going to go into your opponent’s body and come out the other side) as this create’s a “poling/wedging” effect that will impede a grappler’s ability to close and/or clinch with you effectively and will generate a shock wave deep into the body effecting the internal organs.

Of course both methods of punching are effective and both can be used in both contexts, but in general the rules and skill sets of the fighters will favor one or the other.


#3

Great post, as always, sento.

So then my question would be, why wouldn’t the fighter stick the deep shot into the body to begin with?
I’m thinking perhaps the ‘chopping’ shots are easier to land?


#4

My personal favs with body shots are straight punches aimed for solar-plexus, and Bas Rutten’s ‘digging’ liver shots.


#5

Good question Jarvan, I think it’s probably a combination of what they are taught and ease of execution. Many people want to wind up on their hooks (even pros) as it’s just an easier motion to learn. To properly generate power with tight penetrating hooks without a wind up requires more training IME and someone who really knows what they are doing to teach it to you. Also, as you get more tired as the fight goes on punches tend to get more “swingy” due to fatigue in the shoulders.


#6

Yea, one of my favorite boxers of all time, George Foreman, brought hooks from the other side of the stands!
But what an insight factoring in fatigue to the equation.


#7

Shovel Hook (uppercut/hook hybrid) to the liver. More of a drop-pivot-dig than a wind up punch.


#8

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
The best body punchers, or best body punches?

In regards to hitting the body it depends on arena of application and intention of the punch.

If you are punching to the body in a sporting context wherein you fight multiple rounds, and grappling is outlawed (like boxing or kickboxing), then “ice picking/ripping” your punches (basically imaging you are trying to chip off a piece of your opponent’s body, or that you have claws like Wolverine and are going to slash your opponent’s abdomen) to the ribs can over time start to cause bruising and tissue damage to the intercostals and other muscle of the abdominal region which can impede breathing as the rounds wear on. This can also damage the ribs themselves, which again will make breathing more difficult and painful. Once this occurs stamina will be significantly affected and often it will lead to the hands dropping and head being easier to hit.

This is not a great method of body punching if grappling is allowed and you are fighting a skilled grappler or you want to drop someone with a single shot or cause internal damage though. In those situation you are better off “driving/sticking” your punches (basically imagine your fist is going to go into your opponent’s body and come out the other side) as this create’s a “poling/wedging” effect that will impede a grappler’s ability to close and/or clinch with you effectively and will generate a shock wave deep into the body effecting the internal organs.

Of course both methods of punching are effective and both can be used in both contexts, but in general the rules and skill sets of the fighters will favor one or the other.

[/quote]

Sento - I’ve heard now and again about the second method you speak on, mostly in a TMA context. I’d like to know more about it… can you elaborate on it?


#9

Sure Irish,

Essentially this style of body punching is like turning your fist (and body behind it) into a piston. The bones of the forearm line up directly in the “line of force” and create a structure supported via the body’s skeleton and skeletal muscles all the way from the fist to the ground. The result is essentially akin to turning your fist into a battering ram traveling at high speed with the mass of your body behind it. Also since the punches tend to “stick” and occupy the line of entry, they make closing the distance to clinch more difficult.

This is also certainly not unique to TMA’s. Dempsey talked extensively about creating a “power line”, “line of force”, and the advantages of “piston style” punching over swinging/loopy style punching (even to the body) in his book. Again, I’m not saying that “ice picking” can’t still be used where grappling is allowed (for instance I could use such a punch to turn you or clear your guard so I could get an angle on you or punch you in the head with my other hand), just that I wouldn’t use them as often.


#10

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
Sure Irish,

Essentially this style of body punching is like turning your fist (and body behind it) into a piston. The bones of the forearm line up directly in the “line of force” and create a structure supported via the body’s skeleton and skeletal muscles all the way from the fist to the ground. The result is essentially akin to turning your fist into a battering ram traveling at high speed with the mass of your body behind it. Also since the punches tend to “stick” and occupy the line of entry, they make closing the distance to clinch more difficult.

This is also certainly not unique to TMA’s. Dempsey talked extensively about creating a “power line”, “line of force”, and the advantages of “piston style” punching over swinging/loopy style punching (even to the body) in his book. Again, I’m not saying that “ice picking” can’t still be used where grappling is allowed (for instance I could use such a punch to turn you or clear your guard so I could get an angle on you or punch you in the head with my other hand), just that I wouldn’t use them as often.[/quote]

Maybe I’m not clear on the distinction. As a puncher who loves his hook, I try constantly, especially when body punching, to have the pivot of the body do 90 percent of the work.

When you say “ice picking” or “slashing” shots, do you mean just an arm punch to that area?


#11

No, both can involve the whole body or just the arm. The difference is that when you “ice pick” you are “ripping” your shots while when you are “sticking” your shots you are hitting straight through the center of mass of the opponent (sometimes that means hitting diagonally through the center from the ribs/liver up through the opposite side shoulder blade). I’ve posted vids as examples in the past, but will see if I can find some examples again.


#12

Ice picking. Notice how Justin is pulling the hook back towards him (in a circular type of action), and even Freddie is demonstrating an “ice picking” style hook when he is talking about the elbow hitting if the hook misses.


#13

GM Lewis demoing “sticking” the hook/an “inside hook” to the body. He is also throwing a “sticking” hook to the chin.


#14

Ice picking


#15

Sticking


#16

Sticking


#17

Sticking outside hook


#18

[quote]shs101 wrote:
What are the best ways to hit a body shot for maximum power and connection? I’m trying to do a study on the best body punches and how they do/did it.

elbow-hip connection?
hitting specific spots?
digging/pushing the punch?
whats yours?[/quote]

what is this study for?


#19

The best and probably only body shots an amateur should be focusing on IMO, is the solar plexus and the liver.

The liver above all else is probably one of the easiest organs to reach, and has one of the most devastating effects. I’d rather get hit in the head all day than cop one clean dig to the liver, its that painful and will rob even the most determined men of the will to fight.

Solar plexus is another area that particularly easy to hit, as all it requires is a straight shot to the sternum, and will quickly gas somebody out.

Of course there are other areas, but these are the areas I feel an amateur boxer should focus on as unlike a professional you’ve only got 2-4 rounds, its not enough time to play “long game”.


#20

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
No, both can involve the whole body or just the arm. The difference is that when you “ice pick” you are “ripping” your shots while when you are “sticking” your shots you are hitting straight through the center of mass of the opponent (sometimes that means hitting diagonally through the center from the ribs/liver up through the opposite side shoulder blade). I’ve posted vids as examples in the past, but will see if I can find some examples again.[/quote]

What do you mean by ripping your shots and then hitting straight through thec center? I just don’t understand ether the distinction between “ice picking” and “sticking”.