T Nation

Body Fat Set Point


I have a high body fat set point. How can I reset I or lower it.


It depends on your BMI and if Mars is in conjunction with Jupiter.


Actually that’s a very deep and legitimate question but the scope is beyond what I can reply at all sufficiently in a thread. It’s an article or book subject really.

But broadly, yes, because of gene expression affecting factors such as insulin sensitivity, levels of lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes, levels of uncoupling proteins, levels of inflammatory and antiinflammatory adipokines and cytokines, and many more, the body does for a given diet and exercise level have a balance point that it tends pretty strongly to stay at. Without changes in the above factors, fat of course can be lost by substantial caloric deficit but this tends to reverse with time, and metabolism tends to slow with greater fat loss, such as above 10% bodyfat.

Exercise methods to address this are high intensity interval training, resistance training such as taught for example by Vince Gironda or Christian Thibaudeau for fat loss, and low intensity aerobics to some extent.

Dietary methods are discussed much on the website.

There is discussion on the Biotest supplements forum as well.


My answer was a little curt, I must admit.

On the other side of the coin, this has been discussed for many years with no clear conclusion. The first time I read about it was in a medical journal (1990 something) and back then, it was ALL theoretical. Lots of “what if’s”.

For the other part of the argument (IS, Lypo, Subq, etc), I found that Lyle MacDonald explained it quite well. Yes, he came from a Keto point of view, but I found his reasoning quite good.

There is still no clear answer to how to lower your fat set point, as fat set point has not been fully understood.


More precisely, the approximate percentage of bodyfat that an individual person tends to stay at or return to it is a function of many other things rather than being itself (within the body) a particular value.

It’s an experienced thing and a consequence of other things, rather than itself being regulated, for its own sake, to a given value.

As said, it’s beyond content for a thread.

However, how to change where your body tends to stay is something that absolutely has been taught how to do, regardless of reasons as to why.


Now I understand.

Good article. Will have to read it in more dept when I have a little more time.



Thank you!



I loved your article and I keep reading it over and over again, because I am determined to lower my Fat set point.

Thank you for writing this article, very helpful.


Thank you for posting that! You’re very welcome!

By the way, there was a thread posted recently that may help. I thought it was great because Coach Thibaudeau came in with some great and detailed advice on the training end, and the training part of it is so important: http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_performance_nutrition_supplements/diet_doesnt_work_tried_it_all_helpcoach_needed?id=6273770&pageNo=1


[quote]The Big AC wrote:

I loved your article and I keep reading it over and over again, because I am determined to lower my Fat set point.

Thank you for writing this article, very helpful.[/quote]
same here, I’ve read it a couple times now just to reinforce some points.

For me that point is insulin sensitivity like Bill mentioned, and making sure I’m not taking anything that may increase insulin resistance, even acutely (such as caffeine anhydrous and the resulting increase in plasma epinephrine).

I’ve actually been drinking coffee instead because of a few studies (4-8 week timeframe) showing that it can lower leptin (a good thing as higher serum leptin, even though it is a satiety hormone, means leptin resistance). Not only that coffee can increase adiponectin and decrease pro-inflammatory markers such as TNF-a, IL-6, and CRP.

The increase in adiponectin is particularly interesting as I (supposedly) have a genotype of the ADIPOQ gene that results in decreased adiponectin. This is a very important hormone that is overlooked because it can control fat metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and has direct anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory activities.

Bill, correct me if I’m way off base, lol.


Not off base at all! :slight_smile:


what article are you guys referring to? I must have missed it


I’m guessing it’s this one: