Board Under Heels When Squating

Hi Everyone

Some coaches on this website CW for example reccomend board’s under heals when squatting,Where as most coaches on the net look down at this saying that if u need a board then flexability is not up to par.

So my question’s are:
1.Is there advantage to using boards under heels?
2.Who here does it.

Peace

HHH

The purpose of a board (or plates) under the heels is not to make it easier for the inflexible. It’s to make the exercise more quad dominant. Front squats are a better quad exercise than backsquats but they take some getting used to. I think elevating the heels is not a bad idea at all while someone is learning front squats until they’ve reached a point where they can do front squats with a challenging weight.

Remember, Olympic Weightlifting shoes have a wooden wedge built into the heal.

I have used a board under my heels in the past and always seem to get a better quad pump when I do.

As far as balance goes, I don’t see much of a difference.

I remember reading that it affects the alignment of the bones in your lower leg at the knee. Over time it can cause knee problems.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
I think elevating the heels is not a bad idea at all while someone is learning front squats until they’ve reached a point where they can do front squats with a challenging weight.[/quote]

I disagree with this practice because when someone is starting a new exercise, they should be using minimal weights until their form is perfect. Only then should they go up in weight.

Having someone compensate for a form deficiency while working up to a challenging load is asking for trouble in my opinion. I used to do this and when I took the board away, I was frustrated at having to reduce the load in order to get the form down and it set me back some time. It’s a totally different feel. I much prefer boardless squats now.

DB

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
jsbrook wrote:
I think elevating the heels is not a bad idea at all while someone is learning front squats until they’ve reached a point where they can do front squats with a challenging weight.

I disagree with this practice because when someone is starting a new exercise, they should be using minimal weights until their form is perfect. Only then should they go up in weight.

Having someone compensate for a form deficiency while working up to a challenging load is asking for trouble in my opinion. I used to do this and when I took the board away, I was frustrated at having to reduce the load in order to get the form down and it set me back some time. It’s a totally different feel. I much prefer boardless squats now.

DB

[/quote]

What? I’m saying the same thing. Maybe I just wasn’t clear. Someone who is learning front squats should start with low weights and get their form down, gradually working up to heavier loads. In the meantime, they can use a board or plates under their heels for traditional BACK SQUATS to make the exercise more quad dominant. I’m not saying they should elevate their heels on the front squats.

[quote]Sifu wrote:
I remember reading that it affects the alignment of the bones in your lower leg at the knee. Over time it can cause knee problems. [/quote]

hmm. I haven’t heard this. Indeed, that’d be very bad.

using boards or plates when squatting is definitely used for those with flexibility issues in the ankles, the idea being to gradually gain flexibility until the squatter can be flat footed on the ground.

How does raising your heels 2" make the exercise more quad dominant?

[quote]bikemike wrote:
How does raising your heels 2" make the exercise more quad dominant?[/quote]

Very good question. But you only have to do 4 or 5 sets in that fashion to realize that it does put more stress on the quads.

[quote]bikemike wrote:
How does raising your heels 2" make the exercise more quad dominant?[/quote]

Changes the center of gravity during the lift.

Raising your heels will recruit the quads more to some degree. It is usually done to compensate for poor flexability/mobility in the ankle joint. Is it dangerous?..Despite what you might have read there really aren’t any solid studies that say this damages the knees…however I would work gaining the proper range of motion in your ankle so you can squat without your heels elevated.

[quote]the MaxX wrote:
bikemike wrote:
How does raising your heels 2" make the exercise more quad dominant?

Changes the center of gravity during the lift.

[/quote]

That’s my point. If you’re 6’ tall, 2" doesn’t do much to alter your
COG. I’m going to try it both ways next time I do squats (Saturday) and see how a board effects the mechanics.