T Nation

Bloomberg: All Jihadists?

“The contrast between criticism of the Swiss and silence about local parallels isnâ??t limited to Egypt. Censure of Switzerland, where about 5 percent of the population is Muslim, was widespread in Islamic countries where Christians face restrictions on practicing their faith.”

â??The decision of the Swiss people stood to be interpreted as xenophobic, prejudiced, discriminative and against the universal human-rights values,â?? said the Organization of the Islamic Conference in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, which represents 57 Muslim-majority nations.

Members include Saudi Arabia, where non-Muslims are arrested for worshipping privately; Maldives, the Indian Ocean atoll where citizenship is reserved for Muslims; Libya, which limits churches to one per denomination in cities; and Iran, where conversion from Islam is punished by death, according to a 2009 U.S. State Department report on religious freedom.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=axK5Voe2uZno&pos=15

They’re all Jihadists, every one of 'em.

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
“The contrast between criticism of the Swiss and silence about local parallels isnâ??t limited to Egypt. Censure of Switzerland, where about 5 percent of the population is Muslim, was widespread in Islamic countries where Christians face restrictions on practicing their faith.”

â??The decision of the Swiss people stood to be interpreted as xenophobic, prejudiced, discriminative and against the universal human-rights values,â?? said the Organization of the Islamic Conference in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, which represents 57 Muslim-majority nations.

Members include Saudi Arabia, where non-Muslims are arrested for worshipping privately; Maldives, the Indian Ocean atoll where citizenship is reserved for Muslims; Libya, which limits churches to one per denomination in cities; and Iran, where conversion from Islam is punished by death, according to a 2009 U.S. State Department report on religious freedom.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=axK5Voe2uZno&pos=15

They’re all Jihadists, every one of 'em.[/quote]

Saudi Arabia is an Islamic countries. Before entering Saudi Arabia, they make you sign a disclaimer where they explain that certain offenses are punishable by DEATH (and it’s written in red bold characters). They don’t claim tolerance. They don’t talk about it. They don’t claim to be a democratic society. And they don’t give a rat’s ass if you’re Buddhist, Zoroastrian or Jewish. You get discriminated against no matter what if your religion isn’t the same as theirs. Even Muslims (Shi’ites, Suffis, etc.) who don’t ascribe to their doctrine get discriminated against.

Switzerland is a country that ratified all the treaties against religious discrimination there are. And it set a modern-day precedent in a so-called Western liberal democracy for singling out a community based on religion/ethnicity in its constitution. Understandably, this sparked a heated debate because what was once taken for granted got shook up. That’s why you see a discrepancy between coverage of the two discriminations.

But if your point is that people in Jeddah who utter the words “tolerance” and “xenophobia” should drop dead, then I’m with you 100%.

[quote]lixy wrote:

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
“The contrast between criticism of the Swiss and silence about local parallels isnÃ?¢??t limited to Egypt. Censure of Switzerland, where about 5 percent of the population is Muslim, was widespread in Islamic countries where Christians face restrictions on practicing their faith.”

�¢??The decision of the Swiss people stood to be interpreted as xenophobic, prejudiced, discriminative and against the universal human-rights values,�¢?? said the Organization of the Islamic Conference in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, which represents 57 Muslim-majority nations.

Members include Saudi Arabia, where non-Muslims are arrested for worshipping privately; Maldives, the Indian Ocean atoll where citizenship is reserved for Muslims; Libya, which limits churches to one per denomination in cities; and Iran, where conversion from Islam is punished by death, according to a 2009 U.S. State Department report on religious freedom.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=axK5Voe2uZno&pos=15

They’re all Jihadists, every one of 'em.[/quote]

Saudi Arabia is an Islamic countries. Before entering Saudi Arabia, they make you sign a disclaimer where they explain that certain offenses are punishable by DEATH (and it’s written in red bold characters). They don’t claim tolerance. They don’t talk about it. They don’t claim to be a democratic society. And they don’t give a rat’s ass if you’re Buddhist, Zoroastrian or Jewish. You get discriminated against no matter what if your religion isn’t the same as theirs. Even Muslims (Shi’ites, Suffis, etc.) who don’t ascribe to their doctrine get discriminated against.

Switzerland is a country that ratified all the treaties against religious discrimination there are. And it set a modern-day precedent in a so-called Western liberal democracy for singling out a community based on religion/ethnicity in its constitution. Understandably, this sparked a heated debate because what was once taken for granted got shook up. That’s why you see a discrepancy between coverage of the two discriminations.

But if your point is that people in Jeddah who utter the words “tolerance” and “xenophobia” should drop dead, then I’m with you 100%. [/quote]

I’m assuming, I hope incorrectly, that the populations of the 57 Muslim countries mentioned in the above hold the same views as their governments. That being the case, doesn’t that to at least a small degree make all those people Jihadists?

What’s the position of Morocco btw? (No, I’m not setting a trap. I just want to know.)

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
I’m assuming, I hope incorrectly, that the populations of the 57 Muslim countries mentioned in the above hold the same views as their governments. [/quote]

Does it look like any of those regimes are legitimate?

The country has plenty of churches and synagogues (with bells that are rang on Sunday!). If you’re a foreigner, you have more rights and freedoms than the locals. But there is not much freedom of religion for said locals.

Well, that is just correct Islam, because Mohammed wasn’t much of a believer in freedom of religion, or of freedom to disagree with him in any way.

(Yes, he did permit people of different beliefs to live, if they paid a tax to Islam, and if he didn’t want to rob their caravan or have some other reason for killing them. But I would not call that freedom, but rather, being under the sword.)