T Nation

Bloody Nose

well, I got my first bloody nose from squatting today. it happens from time to time but this is the first time while i was actually at the gym. had to do my grip work with my head tilted back ha ha…

usually, this happens right before the weights increase. now i was doing WSFSB (west side for skinny bastards) and i actually close grip bench press a 1 rep more then a week ago.

the question is, could the bloody mess be a bad sign and what should i do about it? i’m drinking some magnesium to lower the pressure, it worked before …

you should be fine, however if it keeps happening, and you are bleeding a good amount, not just a little bit, you might have a sinus or nasal cavity problem which is kinda common and not hard to take care of. I forget what its called, its not life threatening, but can get bad.

Congrats It happens.

Now if this is a usual; occasion and not on attempts where your seeing strast giving your all etc Then yhea Id worry if you were going balls the hell out then well it happens. make sure your getting your electrolytes etc.

Phill

You need to learn to breath correctly. Don’t be holding your breath. Good way to blow an eye or head vein. And that would be really bad.

it must be the weather. it went from sunny (high air pressure) to really rainy (low air pressure) in a few days. it makes you sleepy and increases the difference in pressure inside and outside your body. makes you sleepy, slow, and rises you blood pressure a bit too.

sinusitis is bugging me all the time too tho …

i try not to hold the air in there too tight. it kind of begins to escapes at half the lift. breathing with the abs…

it was fun getting some blood on the program copy ha ha. can’t wate for the next weeks ME

[quote]mmllcc wrote:
You need to learn to breath correctly. Don’t be holding your breath. Good way to blow an eye or head vein. And that would be really bad.[/quote]

Why would wanna go giving out bad advice like that, your setting him up for failure.
If your going for an all out max attempt, hold your breath. Yeah your face turns beat red and your nose might bleed. but if you’re breathing into your diaphragm, it helps you stay tight.

Even with the bench press, even though the load isn’t on his spine, you still wanna stay tight.

holding the breath only for the “hard” part of the lift is an OK approach too right?

[quote]mmllcc wrote:
You need to learn to breath correctly. Don’t be holding your breath. Good way to blow an eye or head vein. And that would be really bad.[/quote]

:slight_smile:

[quote]evansmi wrote:
mmllcc wrote:

Why would wanna go giving out bad advice like that, your setting him up for failure.
If your going for an all out max attempt, hold your breath. Yeah your face turns beat red and your nose might bleed. but if you’re breathing into your diaphragm, it helps you stay tight.
[/quote]

I suppose this depends on your view of things. You can:

  1. Breath when you lift. Your PR might be a few pounds less than what you can absolutely do. But over time your PR will increase with steady work.

OR

  1. Hold your breath, use it to keep your core stable and put up just a few more pounds; this time anyway. And maybe also get a nose bleed, broken eye vessels, and nice pool of blood in the brain…And die. Of course now you won’t be getting anymore PRs for sure.

Seriously, holding your breath is just a poor technique to compensate for a weak core.

If you want to be lifting heavy when you are 70…breath.

[quote]mmllcc wrote:
evansmi wrote:
mmllcc wrote:

Why would wanna go giving out bad advice like that, your setting him up for failure.
If your going for an all out max attempt, hold your breath. Yeah your face turns beat red and your nose might bleed. but if you’re breathing into your diaphragm, it helps you stay tight.

I suppose this depends on your view of things. You can:

  1. Breath when you lift. Your PR might be a few pounds less than what you can absolutely do. But over time your PR will increase with steady work.

OR

  1. Hold your breath, use it to keep your core stable and put up just a few more pounds; this time anyway. And maybe also get a nose bleed, broken eye vessels, and nice pool of blood in the brain…And die. Of course now you won’t be getting anymore PRs for sure.

Seriously, holding your breath is just a poor technique to compensate for a weak core.

If you want to be lifting heavy when you are 70…breath.[/quote]

Holy hell get out of the strength sports section. I would like to see you squat without holding your breath.

Seriously. Stop posting until you learn a thing or two.

Go away mmllcc.

Taking air into your stomach and holding it for ANY PR attempt is the way to do it.

[quote]Ghost22 wrote:
Go away mmllcc.

Taking air into your stomach and holding it for ANY PR attempt is the way to do it.[/quote]

“ANY” PR attempt – you are a moron.

[quote]Florida Titan wrote:

Holy hell get out of the strength sports section. I would like to see you squat without holding your breath.

Seriously. Stop posting until you learn a thing or two.
[/quote]

I learned to breath while lifting years ago. In the 13 or so years I have training I have seen people holding their breath pass out and drop bars on themselves, one person pop a vessel in their head and is to this day paralyzed, busted vessels in the eye that have impaired eye sight, etc.

In sports you need to be able to breath while exerting as much as force as possible. Especially in wrestling and strong man type events. So just because YOU learned one way to lift doesn’t mean there is not a better way. It just means your training has been narrow, incomplete, and short-sighted.

Also - note I did say you could possibly lift more by holding your breath. But each person should evaluate that risk separately and fully understand if it may be necessary or fit into their long term goals.

So – you get out of here until you learn some things.

A burst blood vessel in the brain is a direct effect of a genetic disposition to have berry aneursyms. Your friend that died could have just as easily died from a high stress work environment, high blood pressure or a poor diet.

Proper lifting technique as taught by ANY successful/well known strength coach would agree that a strong tight core filled with air to increase interabdominal pressure is the way to perform any powerlift. Your chances of dying from an aneurysm, passing out mid lift, or blowing an eye vessel is much less common than say herniating your abdomen, slipping a disk or collasping under the weight due to no air in the stomach.

Your 13 years of weight room experience is nothing compared to the thousands of years of combined experience and educational background of the world’s top strength and conditioning coaches that teach the opposite of what you believe.

Please stop polluting this site with ignorance.

[quote]Florida Titan wrote:

world’s top strength and conditioning coaches that teach the opposite of what you believe.

[/quote]

Really? Name them.

[quote]compared to the thousands of years of combined experience
[/quote]

lol

could it be you just adapt to the way you lift in this case? like the blood vessels becoming more flexible, thicker, more dense in your head, and stuff, if you keep the air in ?(i do head stands from time to time to get the same effect)

every thing else that gets stressed seems to adapt well in most cases…

the nose vessels could as well be a natural decompression valve. it is the first thing to break, you are forced to stop what you are doing. your head pressure should decrease a bit too.

[quote]mmllcc wrote:

Seriously, holding your breath is just a poor technique to compensate for a weak core.
[/quote]

Seriously, one of the most blatantly incorrect things I’ve ever read here.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
mmllcc wrote:

Seriously, holding your breath is just a poor technique to compensate for a weak core.

Seriously, one of the most blatantly incorrect things I’ve ever read here.
[/quote]

How is it incorrect genius?

If I lift my cat I can do so while breathing without busting my gut. If I squat 100 lb I can breath and lift without busting my gut. If I squat 200 lbs I can do so without busting my gut. If I squat 300 lbs I can breath and do the lift without busting my gut, etc. However – eventually my core will be stressed to the point that breathing is more difficult under heavy loads – and thus to breath under heavy loads you must learn how to breath.

Under extremely heavy loads the weakest point will break – for MANY this is when a hernia occurs (others a leg breaks or whatever). To help strengthen that area to prevent a hernia, people hold their breath; using the diaphragm and air pressure to create extra abdominal pressure to give static strength to that area – because it is the weak link.

[quote]mmllcc wrote:
Florida Titan wrote:

world’s top strength and conditioning coaches that teach the opposite of what you believe.

Really? Name them.
[/quote]

All of them…

This is stupid and I’m going to stop feeding trolls.

[quote]sabaz wrote:
well, I got my first bloody nose from squatting today. it happens from time to time but this is the first time while i was actually at the gym. had to do my grip work with my head tilted back ha ha…

usually, this happens right before the weights increase. now i was doing WSFSB (west side for skinny bastards) and i actually close grip bench press a 1 rep more then a week ago.

the question is, could the bloody mess be a bad sign and what should i do about it? i’m drinking some magnesium to lower the pressure, it worked before …[/quote]

I got blod running from my nose on the 2nd rep in a 5 rep set on smolov base meso cycle. 3rd week 3rd day.

I did the program with front squats.

Of course i completed the set.

After set was completed i ran to the toilett. My mouth was covered with blood from the nose.

Pretty hardcore i tought.

But I never got it on cam. :frowning: