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Blenders and Glycemic Index

Does anyone know whether putting frozen or unfrozen fruit in a blender could raise its glycemic index?

Thanks

I have heard that the smaller the oat size, the higher it’s GI.

Given that, I believe there would be a relation between particle size and GI; the smaller the particle, the higher.

However, it is fruit you are talking about, it might raise it’s glycemic index to something slightly less negligible. Don’t worry too much about it.

[quote]silverhydra wrote:
Don’t worry too much about it.
[/quote]

A smaller particle size will speed mechanical digestion, but assuming that you chew your food well, it’s not something worth worrying about.

[quote]HK24719 wrote:

[quote]silverhydra wrote:
Don’t worry too much about it.
[/quote]

A smaller particle size will speed mechanical digestion, but assuming that you chew your food well, it’s not something worth worrying about.

[/quote]

Whoops, forgot about chewing; my bad.

I guess I can’t extrapolate the oats example, as that is one of the only carbohydrates that you don’t really chew.

With the oat example, the smaller pieces usually lose some of the bran portion during processing. This seems to account for the difference.

I would suspect if there was an effect, it would come from the temperature of the fruit, with the frozen being a tad slower to absorb. I doubt that the difference is significant though.

One would be better off changing the fruit used to affect the glucose exposure (not just GI, but insulin release and the Area Under Curve for blood glucose, as well as shape of curve). For example raspberries have around 6g of digestible carbs per 100g and around 6g of fiber. Contrast fruit like bananas, grapes, and mangoes which have around 3 times the carb content and less fiber.

Regardless, the actual differences are small unless one is on a very low carb diet. Outside this case, anyone eating fruit at a meal instead of other carb sources has already done most of the optimization possible.