T Nation

Black Book - Edits and Revisions?


#1

Hi Coach,

I recently pulled out your ‘Black Book…’ to review the chapter on olympic weightlifting, and I decided to re-read the whole book from the beginning again as a refresher. This made me wonder: if you had to edit parts of it or re-write any chapters, which ones would they be? Or which topics would undergo more significant changes if you had to release an updated version?

I understand your latest book (‘Maximum Muscle Bible’) is a good sum of your recent findings, but I’d still be curious if there are parts of your first book which you’d completely or partly re-do or re-write.

Cheers.


#2

I would actually start over completely!!! That was written almost 20 years ago. Still good info. Out of all the section the Olympic lifting one is actually the worst LOL. I was a weightlifter back then but didn’t know the perfect teaching sequence. The info is still good, but what I would write now would be a lot more in depth.

Out of all my books “Theory and Application of Modern Strength an Power Methods” is BY FAR the best.


#3

That’s good to know. I’ve mainly been using the OL warm-up sequence you suggest as well as the Javorek complex. I also found the breakdowns and descriptions of each movement to be very good.

Thanks.


#4

Yes, that is a most excellent warm-up


#5

Could you summarize the OL warm up sequence?


#6

Sure. In a nutshell, you do this (each movement is done with the bar only):

  1. 30 sec. of snatch-grip barbell stretching in a squat position with the barbell pressed against your hips and your back arched
  2. 2 x 6 external rotation
  3. 2 x 6 behind the neck snatch-grip press
  4. 2x6 OH squats

Then the javorek complex.


#7

I noted in the book that you place a certain emphasis on an athlete’s fiber type for different considerations such as rep ranges, total volume, etc. Do you still give consideration to fiber type when working with clients or building training programs for them?


#8

I do, but not as much as in the past. Rather I use fiber dominance along with neurological dominance and body type to determine the type of training, amount of work, exercise selection and training methods used.