T Nation

BJJ & Original JiuJutsu

Brazilian JiuJutsu has come a long way from, the introduction by Count Maeda to the refinement by Helio Gracie. This martial art is quickly becoming very popular around world and obviously in the fight world. My question is this can be BJJ now be seen as JiuJutsu? Adopting the ideology by the Samurai that you live on practicing your techniques since they were effective or you simply die with them because its ineffective.

Can we now recognize it as living up to the name JiuJutsu that was originaly founded and not like the Mcdojos? I want this to be a serious discussion by martial artists and people who practice BJJ because right now BJJ has guided many martial artists to rethink what is fighting.

[quote]wolf54 wrote:
Brazilian JiuJutsu has come a long way from, the introduction by Count Maeda to the refinement by Helio Gracie. This martial art is quickly becoming very popular around world and obviously in the fight world. My question is this can be BJJ now be seen as JiuJutsu? Adopting the ideology by the Samurai that you live on practicing your techniques since they were effective or you simply die with them because its ineffective.

Can we now recognize it as living up to the name JiuJutsu that was originaly founded and not like the Mcdojos? I want this to be a serious discussion by martial artists and people who practice BJJ because right now BJJ has guided many martial artists to rethink what is fighting.[/quote]

Seems kind of like you’re rambling a bit … what exactly are you asking? Are you asking if Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is comparable to Japanese Jujitsu? They are in essence the same thing. This is a quote out of Renzo’s book

Since Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fits this definition of the Japanese terms Ju and Jitsu … yeah it is ‘living up to the name JiuJutsu’

Is that what you were looking for?

Brazilian Jujitsu (Jiu-Jitsu is nothing more than an alternate spelling of jujitsu) is pretty much identical to pre-WWII Judo Newaza (groundwork).

BJJ is Judo specialized on groundwork, with a broader array of allowable techiques during competition and different rules and scoring.

But there is almost nothing in BJJ that is not also in Judo (at least as it was practiced and trained pre-WWII).

Considering that Maeda was a Judoka from the Kodokan, that makes perfect sense.

How do you know what the Samurai thought of jiu/ju-jitsu?

I bet you they focussed mainly on armed combat so they probably didn’t think much of it.

You also speak of ju/jiu-jitsu like it was something that someone just thought of one day. ORIGINALLY founded? By who? When? Where? It was a somewhat all encompassing term that applied to many different schools of combat. I ASSUME you mean Kano’s Judo. But who knows?

You are very vague.

[quote]Checkmate wrote:
Brazilian Jujitsu (Jiu-Jitsu is nothing more than an alternate spelling of jujitsu) is pretty much identical to pre-WWII Judo Newaza (groundwork).

BJJ is Judo specialized on groundwork, with a broader array of allowable techiques during competition and different rules and scoring.

But there is almost nothing in BJJ that is not also in Judo (at least as it was practiced and trained pre-WWII).

Considering that Maeda was a Judoka from the Kodokan, that makes perfect sense.[/quote]

checkmate beat me to it. this is exactly correct.

[quote]rawda wrote:
Checkmate wrote:
Brazilian Jujitsu (Jiu-Jitsu is nothing more than an alternate spelling of jujitsu) is pretty much identical to pre-WWII Judo Newaza (groundwork).

BJJ is Judo specialized on groundwork, with a broader array of allowable techiques during competition and different rules and scoring.

But there is almost nothing in BJJ that is not also in Judo (at least as it was practiced and trained pre-WWII).

Considering that Maeda was a Judoka from the Kodokan, that makes perfect sense.

checkmate beat me to it. this is exactly correct. [/quote]

Agreed - BJJ is basically founded on Kosen Ryu Judo. Compared to other Judo schools at the time their throws were’nt as good and were renowned at times to start a competitive match by lying flat on their backs which forced the opponent to engage on the ground immediatley.

People have a definite idea of what Judo is but not ju-jitsu (it can encompass a broad range of styles) so that was why BJJ is what it is called and not Brazilian Judo.
A great sporting art which i’d love to practice a lot more.

Maeda left Japan in 1904. The first Kosen school was established in 1914. Why does everyone still say Maeda taught Kosen Judo? They all came from the Kodokan but Maeda did not have anything to do with the Kosen clubs that started in the school systems.

Judo Newaza