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Biceptal Tendonitis: Exercises?

Does anyone know any specific exercises that target the biceptal tendon?I have a reoccuring case of biceptal tendonitis that has wreaked havoc on my bench press and even affected my grip for deadlift these past few years.

The injury only bothers me in the top or lockout portion of the lift and only in flat or decline presses ,incline and shoulder presses are not affected.To address this problem I have included lots of floor presses,board presses and rack lockouts with little to no success.

Also I do lots of rotator work and as a result my rotator cuff is quite strong but it does not carry over to the biceptal tendon.I press with a powerlifting type style elbows tucked,shoulders pulled back,arched lower back but this injury still affects my pressing.

As far as seeking treatment I have seen several types of practitioners(active release ,physio,chiropractor) with only limited results at best.What I am looking for is some exercises that target the biceptal tendon better ,especially in the position it would be in should I be benching.Do you have any suggestions

I’ve had some nagging issues like yours. I always thought that bench press was the irritant. I was wrong. It was low-bar squats. A couple months ago, I move the bar position on all my squat up an inch or two. Since then, no pain.

TC has a great article few years back about eccentric work for bicep tendonitis. Sorry dont have a link but search for it its all but slow eccentrics only to build the tendon strength etc

Phill

[quote]Pantera freak wrote:
Does anyone know any specific exercises that target the biceptal tendon?I have a reoccuring case of biceptal tendonitis that has wreaked havoc on my bench press and even affected my grip for deadlift these past few years.
[/quote]

If it is the long head tendon that is the issue it is a touchy area that is often misdiagnosed. Seeing a rheumatologist is best for getting the correct diagnosis of what it actually is, ie an internal rotator or actually the biceps tendon.

If it is the long head, the bicepital groove it sits in sometimes wears out from over use or a normal degeneration over years.

Sometimes the ligamentous tissue which covers it becomes lax and both these situations may cause the biceps tendon to move around, thus inflaming it (tendonitis). Taking some anti-inflamatories is helpful sometimes. In worse case scenarios a shot of cortisol is needed.

You should avoid anything that places the biceps in a stretch position. Ie, flat benching, incline benching incline curls or flyes.

However you said you aren’t bothered when performing incline presses or shoulder presses, but rather in flat benching or decline pressing.

That leads me to believe that it is short head or corachobrachialis which both insert at roughly the same area. If it is a biceps issue and not another tendon.

Diet wise
I find, cutting out a lot of crap during winter time, ie no starches, breads, rice, pasta, potatoes or other hi gi foods helps. Increasing fats helps me as well. I also drink a very high quality aloe vera and supplement with greens.

Eat a more raw diet with plenty of fish.

[quote]
The injury only bothers me in the top or lockout portion of the lift and only in flat or decline presses ,incline and shoulder presses are not affected.To address this problem I have included lots of floor presses,board presses and rack lockouts with little to no success.[/quote]

Sometimes you don’t need more exercises to help. Sometimes you need less otherwise you may injure the area more.

[quote]
Also I do lots of rotator work and as a result my rotator cuff is quite strong but it does not carry over to the biceptal tendon.I press with a powerlifting type style elbows tucked,shoulders pulled back,arched lower back but this injury still affects my pressing.[/quote]

As mentioned above, you may need less not more work. You’re only as strong as your weakest link so taking a little time off, losing a little strength in a movement in seeking improvement in that weaker link may end up paying dividends later.

[quote]
As far as seeking treatment I have seen several types of practitioners(active release ,physio,chiropractor) with only limited results at best.What I am looking for is some exercises that target the biceptal tendon better ,especially in the position it would be in should I be benching.Do you have any suggestions [/quote]

If it is the long head, when I had issues the rheumatologist told me to roll up a towel until it was fairly thick, about 21-25 inches. Tuck it under your armpit and really wedge it up there. Close your arm on it and find a wall.

With the towel still under your armpit, bend your elbow to 90 degrees and place your whole forearm against a wall from elbow to wrist. With your feet press your body into the wall and with your shoulder laterally press away from the wall like your on a nautilus machine doing lateral shoulder raises but hold it in like a static contraction by equalling the lateral raise with your feet pressing back into the wall. This helps the long head biceps tendon slip back into position.

Do that twice a day three times a week limiting the work you do on it and if you do any shoulder, arm or back work do it at the end of your workout.

That’s if it is the long head.

But would definitely reccomend seeing a rheumatologist.

best wishes