T Nation

Beyond Brawn

I am wondering if anyone has read and followed the concepts in Beyond Brawn.
I have never seen anything mentioned about abbreviated training at T-Mag, so
I am wondering if it is worth checking out or not…Thanx

I have the book, and was a Hardgainer subscriber until it went under last year.

Is it worth it? It is a good book and if you like collecting and reading about physical culture, then it’s worth it on that basis alone. There’s also good stuff about ART.

As a training manual, I do credit it with getting me serious about the basic lifts: squat, deadlift, press, chins, etc. To that extent it is great. The downside to it is its preachiness, single-mindedness, and lack of adaptability. Another limitation is that McRobert himself stated that his methods are more suited for a skinny/lean person looking to pack on muscle. If you’re a person who carries a bit more bodyfat already, then it may not be for you.

Keep in mind this is just a quick impression I’m giving, it’s not at all comprehenisive, and I don’t presume to discount McRobert’s work in summary fashion.

I have “Brawn” and it is supposedly very similar to “Beyond Brawn.”

Both pale in comparison to Pavel’s “Beyond Bodybuilding.” It is the most badass training book I’ve read.

I have both Brawn and Beyond Brawn. I basically agree with bino’s comments.

A little single minded… not always a bad thing. I became single minded about training being my #1 “leisure” activity.

It got me serious about planning and logging my workouts. I think the training log is a HUGE factor in successful lifting.

Squats, deads, rows, bench! BASICS!

I like Brawn quite a bit more than Beyond Brawn.

I still like to do the abbreviated thing sometimes. 2 different full body workouts a week… especially in the summer when I’d rather be out enjoying the fact that I am in pretty good shape.

LA

I think it’s a great resource, especially for natural trainees.

Now that I’ve been thinking about it more, Brawn may have had a bigger impact on me than I gave it credit for. My workouts are almost exactly the same in that I workout 2-3 times per week, do the big movements only once per week, 3-4 movements per workout.

The only things that have really changed are that I don’t go to failure (although McRobert himself said it’s okay to stop one rep short–so is it really HIT?), and I switch up my set/rep schemes, 5X5 for a month, then 10X3, etc.

Alot of flak was given to the hardgainer term and the people who wrote info based on it. But I have to say that Beyond Brawn (which was an update of Brawn) is a good foundation book. It really does want you to focus on the basics, plan and record your workouts and food intake, and keep your program balanced to avoid injury.

It does fall down in the steroid bashing (although he is right to some extent about the mainstream muscle mags presenting roid based programs and BB’s as achievable by anyone) and flexibilty of training.

Either way its a good book, but there are others that are better.

You guys should check out my new book - Scrawny to Brawny. You can read excerpts at www.scrawnytobrawny.com.

It’s a science based, updated, reved up version of Brawn. Kinda like Brawn for this next generation - the intelligent, science driven lifter.

I think you’ll love it.

[quote]John M Berardi wrote:
You guys should check out my new book - Scrawny to Brawny. You can read excerpts at www.scrawnytobrawny.com.

It’s a science based, updated, reved up version of Brawn. Kinda like Brawn for this next generation - the intelligent, science driven lifter.

I think you’ll love it.

[/quote]

I just ordered it. I’m looking forward to reading it. Sounds like a great concept! I really like your writing style, you have the ability to take an at times rather dry subject and not only make it interesting but entertaining. I’ll post a review when I finish.

Cheers,

RW

I didn’t know the hardgainer went under. I used to read it back in the day. It used to be a great resource for natural trainers.

Has anyone ever seen Stuart McRobert?