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Best Way to Jerk?


#1

I am currently being coached for Olympic lifting and we have been focusing on the clean and jerk. I can do 105kg but my front squat is my weak link. My question, however revolves around the jerk. I was taught to split jerk but I feel comfortable trying the dip jerk(not the correct name I am sure). My question is, what are the pros and cons of both and should I try to focus on the dip jerk?

Thanks


#2

it’s called the squat jerk. IMO, i dont think it’s the best way to jerk. when using heavy weights you need to basically overhead squat them to complete the jerk. this adds another movement to the lift which is potential to fail. split jerking is much more efficient.

look at these two videos and tell me which jerk looks more efficient:

squat jerk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP-eRlIvfF8

split jerk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_71R9wUxEnQ

it’s obvious that the split jerk is better because it basically punts the need to overhead squat


#3

Best way to jerk?

With a box of kleenex and lotion.


#4

stick to the split jerk. By the time that it might be a good idea to consider the squat jerk you should already have your answer.


#5

When you wanna do a squat jerk, try to not let your body get down to the squat position (ass to grass) like I used to do. The technique (speed etc.) is nearly identical to split jerk. One benefit of squat jerking is that it’s “easier” to deploy your legs side to side because the movement is symmetrical and there’s less distance to travel. The disadvantage is that the position is more unstable.

The “deep” squat jerk can be utilized if your shoulders or any part of your arms hurt. Here you let the bar push your body down after catching it so there’s no sudden stop/deceleration that could aggravate the injury. It’s far more unstable than both versions though.

Note that all of this is only from my experience.


#6

You don’t have to squat aaaaaall the way down in the push jerk.

And both jerks work, they don’t have a huge advantage over the other. The split jerk adds stability though


#7

What ever puts the most amount of weight up for you with gains year on year.

If that ist he split, power or squat Jerk GO FOR IT.

For 99% of people it’s the split Jerk.

Koing


#8

Watch Dimas’ squat jerk at the 96 Olympics. Brutal.


#9

Push/Squat jerk ftw. Very few people can do it. Feel lucky that you can and have worked for it. It’s much more efficient, especially for taller athletes. You don’t have to take a long time to split the legs, you’re in position when you rack the clean.

The “downsides” are you need much better balance and strength in the hole. Which is why I feel all athletes that can should push and squat jerk regularly, as the strength carryover is huge. Personally, I can push jerk at least 30-40 kg more than I can squat jerk. Although as you get stronger through more close-grip overhead squats, this gap should close.

What’s the ultimate balance exercise in weightlifting? Squat jerks.
What’s the ultimate full-body strength/flexibility building exercise? Close-grip overhead squats.

Also, your hip strength will develop more equally, as you are on a perfectly-parallel plane.


#10

[quote]TurboLykes wrote:
Push/Squat jerk ftw. Very few people can do it. Feel lucky that you can and have worked for it. It’s much more efficient, especially for taller athletes. You don’t have to take a long time to split the legs, you’re in position when you rack the clean.

The “downsides” are you need much better balance and strength in the hole. Which is why I feel all athletes that can should push and squat jerk regularly, as the strength carryover is huge. Personally, I can push jerk at least 30-40 kg more than I can squat jerk. Although as you get stronger through more close-grip overhead squats, this gap should close.

What’s the ultimate balance exercise in weightlifting? Squat jerks.
What’s the ultimate full-body strength/flexibility building exercise? Close-grip overhead squats.

Also, your hip strength will develop more equally, as you are on a perfectly-parallel plane.[/quote]

Today i decided that i’m going to train the push jerk and use it in competition. As I feel that it relies on my glutes/posterior chain more, which is my strongest body part. Also it looks cool, somehow it will make you lift with “style”.

And maybe it’s just because i’m starting to like pyrros dimas as my inspiration. (not that i’m transforming into TYPE2B or something though…)

EDIT: gramar


#11

[quote]Demidevil wrote:

[quote]TurboLykes wrote:
Push/Squat jerk ftw. Very few people can do it. Feel lucky that you can and have worked for it. It’s much more efficient, especially for taller athletes. You don’t have to take a long time to split the legs, you’re in position when you rack the clean.

The “downsides” are you need much better balance and strength in the hole. Which is why I feel all athletes that can should push and squat jerk regularly, as the strength carryover is huge. Personally, I can push jerk at least 30-40 kg more than I can squat jerk. Although as you get stronger through more close-grip overhead squats, this gap should close.

What’s the ultimate balance exercise in weightlifting? Squat jerks.
What’s the ultimate full-body strength/flexibility building exercise? Close-grip overhead squats.

Also, your hip strength will develop more equally, as you are on a perfectly-parallel plane.[/quote]

Today i decided that i’m going to train the push jerk and use it in competition. As I feel that it relies on my glutes/posterior chain more, which is my strongest body part. Also it looks cool, somehow it will make you lift with “style”.

And maybe it’s just because i’m starting to like pyrros dimas as my inspiration. (not that i’m transforming into TYPE2B or something though…)

EDIT: gramar
[/quote]

It’s Power Jerk. There is no push jerk.

What’s the ultimate full-body strength/flexibility building exercise? Snatch


#12

[quote]Koing wrote:

[quote]Demidevil wrote:

[quote]TurboLykes wrote:
Push/Squat jerk ftw. Very few people can do it. Feel lucky that you can and have worked for it. It’s much more efficient, especially for taller athletes. You don’t have to take a long time to split the legs, you’re in position when you rack the clean.

The “downsides” are you need much better balance and strength in the hole. Which is why I feel all athletes that can should push and squat jerk regularly, as the strength carryover is huge. Personally, I can push jerk at least 30-40 kg more than I can squat jerk. Although as you get stronger through more close-grip overhead squats, this gap should close.

What’s the ultimate balance exercise in weightlifting? Squat jerks.
What’s the ultimate full-body strength/flexibility building exercise? Close-grip overhead squats.

Also, your hip strength will develop more equally, as you are on a perfectly-parallel plane.[/quote]

Today i decided that i’m going to train the push jerk and use it in competition. As I feel that it relies on my glutes/posterior chain more, which is my strongest body part. Also it looks cool, somehow it will make you lift with “style”.

And maybe it’s just because i’m starting to like pyrros dimas as my inspiration. (not that i’m transforming into TYPE2B or something though…)

EDIT: gramar
[/quote]

It’s Power Jerk. There is no push jerk.

What’s the ultimate full-body strength/flexibility building exercise? Snatch
[/quote]

It’s interesting to note a squat jerk is just like like a snatch, only with the hands really close.

And as far as naming goes, I like what an Australian commentator in the 2004 Olympics called it, the “jump jerk.” It seems the most accurate. As “power” and “push” are pretty arbitrary.


#13

[quote]TurboLykes wrote:

It’s interesting to note a squat jerk is just like like a snatch, only with the hands really close.

[/quote]

To be fair, a squat jerk is more like a drop snatch, rather than a standard snatch. Although the similarities are obvious, so are the differences (i.e the snatch starts on the ground).


#14

[quote]TurboLykes wrote:

It’s interesting to note a squat jerk is just like like a snatch, only with the hands really close.

And as far as naming goes, I like what an Australian commentator in the 2004 Olympics called it, the “jump jerk.” It seems the most accurate. As “power” and “push” are pretty arbitrary.[/quote]

I agree. I used the therm push jerk because the movement looks more like a “push” to me. Also, isn’t the split jerk a “power” movement too?


#15

[quote]TurboLykes wrote:
And as far as naming goes, I like what an Australian commentator in the 2004 Olympics called it, the “jump jerk.” It seems the most accurate. As “power” and “push” are pretty arbitrary.[/quote]

WTF? You can’t make up your own naming conventions.

Power Jerk = your hips don’t break parallel on the receive
Split Jerk = your feet splits forwards and backwards
Squat Jerk = your hips go below parallel on the receive

[quote]Demidevil wrote:
I agree. I used the therm push jerk because the movement looks more like a “push” to me. Also, isn’t the split jerk a “power” movement too?[/quote]

Push Jerk/ Push Press = dip and drive
Power Jerk = dip, drive and dip again

The split is a split, its not a power movement (Power Clean, Power Snatch, Power Jerk). Power would be your feet go out a bit and your hips don’t break parallel.

Koing


#16

The split jerk is A LOT easier for most people.

The advantage of splitting is that it’s more STABLE back/front than squatting, although squatting allows you to get LOWER.

To do a squat jerk you need to have great accuracy placing the bar overhead, and also great shoulder flexibility (basically makes it a narrow snatch position).

Also, Dimas and Kendrick Ferris started as split jerkers, then changed. Kendrick’s an amazing lifter, but misses a LOT of jerks. Dimas is a bad subject, he’s basically not human! haha

Do what you feel best doing, but I’d say split jerk.


#17

I’m an awful person, I know, I’m sorry.