T Nation

Best Training Method for My Genetics?


#1

Hi,

my mom was a marathon runne(ecto)r and my dad a professional swimmer(meso).Unfortunately i got my moms genetics and i have been struggling to put on muscle all along-So is there any type of weight training, which can utilize my high lactate tolerance and slow twitch muscle fibers?I can do cardio any high rep low weight for hours and don’t crash, but short bursts of energy are quite hard to produce.


#2

punch your mum! Just kidding…

I wouldn’t worry too much about it; just train the way you want to train. Want to be a bodybuilder? Train like a bodybuilder. Fancy a shot at powerlifting? Then powerlift away, my boy.

If you just train the way you want to train, then you’ll be motivated enough to get results regardless of how bad your genetics for that type of training may or may not be. Sure, there’ll be people out there with better genetics than you who’ll probably achieve more than you, but that won’t matter to you if you are training in a discipline and for a goal you love, so just do what you want to do.

To use myself as an example, I’m about as ectomorphic as it gets with the metabolism of a hummingbird. I have probably the worst genetics for bodybuilding in the history of mankind, but I love the training so I’ve hammered away at it for years and despite my various shortcomings I’ve developed a physique that I know will never win any trophies but it’s certainly nothing to be ashamed at and even gets the occasional compliment.

So… yeah. Just train however you want. Genetics be damned!


#3

[quote=“Yogi_, post:2, topic:214247”]
I’m about as ectomorphic as it gets […]
I have probably the worst genetics for bodybuilding […]
I’ve developed a physique […]
even gets the occasional compliment[/quote]

:smirk:


#4

[quote=“mtc586, post:1, topic:214247”]
So is there any type of weight training, which can utilize my high lactate tolerance and slow twitch muscle fibers?I[/quote]
Farmer’s walks into the kitchen, followed by low volume, high frequency eggs and potatoes.

Seriously, what’s your current height and weight? And I’m guessing you’re pretty lean with some definition?

Somatotypes (ecto, meso, whatever) have basically nothing at all to do with actual training and nutrition. It’s best to simply forget about them. But if you’re telling me that both of your parents are on the skinnier side and did well at endurance sports, that’s a little more relevant (but still shouldn’t be the be-all, end-all of designing your plan).

Like Yogi said, you can and should train like any other guy who wants to add size. A smart plan that trains the entire body (not meaning in each session, simply not neglecting any bodyparts) with consistent eating (abundant calories from protein, fat, and carbs).

Plenty of programs on the site fit the bill. For an eating plan, I like this general approach, but there’s a bunch of other simple, effective options.


#5

When I was 15 I weighed 105lbs. The fat kids in school beat me at sprinting. So I trained long distance running and got really good at it. Then I started lifting weights at 16 and got really strong while force feeding myself and gained a ton of weight. Then I joined the military and found out I was good at both endurance activities and those that require short bursts of strength because I had built a lot of muscle in the years prior to enlistment. . When I stopped training at 25yrs I weighed 210+lbs. I lost 70+lbs just by eating 3 normal meals a day over a year.

If some wannabe trainer/fitness expert/guru/author tried to assess me for some kind of predetermined bodytype at different points within these 10 years, the conclusions would all have been different. You are a beginner and you are assessing yourself with 2nd hand information, much of which I bet was written by the aforementioned wannabes.

Stop reading the internet. Most of it is bullshit. Go eat and lift weights with the big guys in the gym.


#6

[quote]
Yogi wrote: Haha, if I get my heart rate down to 60 bpm then I’ll take a photo in your choice of women’s underwear and heels!

:grin:
[/quote]…


#7

I used to be 160 lbs at 6’1 after 1 year of training and I though it was due to shitty genetics.But when I looked back after a whole year of training I could only bench 175 x 5-6 reps and couldn’t squat 250 to proper depth.When I got stronger I started getting bigger.So just follow something like 531 and get strong