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#1

I posted my weekly workout last week.
It basically consists of training 3 days a week using compund lifts (I've copied and pasted it below):-

Sunday
Power clean & Press-
Over head squats
Bench Press
Bent over rows - to waist

Monday
Abs + cardio - 15-20 minutes running

Tuesday
Conventional squats
Chin up
Dips
Bent over rows to upper chest

Wednesday
MMA/Boxing/Sparring

Thursday
Deadlift
Military Press
Good Mornings

I want to get stronger in all my lifts while improving cardio, and my boxing skills.
I have 2 cycles of MAG-10 sitting in my cupboard, would it be a waste of MAG-10 if I used it for the above workout?? Is the best use of MAG-10 as the prescribed workout which was written when MAG-10 was released?? growth surge project I think it's called, using sets of 10 reps??
I'm currently using 5x5??

Or would it be better to use something like Carbolin 19 or Alpha Male and save the MAG-10 for a pure bulking phase??


#2

Compound lifts and MMa training as well will burn you out no matter what concoction you take. As for your bulking phase you sound like a bodybuilder. Spend your time sparring, rolling and boxing, get some fights in to toughen you up too. No weight training exercise will help your boxing as much as just boxing.

If you want to train grappling, get a partner to train with , weights wont help you much as they dont mimic the strength needed to grapple, you only really get that from grappling (see supertraining), thats often why big strong mma guys often suck on the mat. When you`ve won a few fights and impressed with your skill then you could see if you can get in an MMA gym.

Play to your skills, ifyour in against a 280 pound former college wrestler then your unlikely to match him on the ground no matter how many deadlifts or bench presses you put in, instead practice your sprawls and boxing. At the stage you are probably at now weight training is`nt really required, it just takes time away from sparring and skills.

Its like a few years back Jerrel Venetian fought Hirotaka Yokoi in a pride match, Venetian was a former K-1 kickboxing grand champion, Yokoi had no stand up yet excelled on the ground. This was an MMA match and venetian and yokoi went at it yet venetian fought the fight exactly like a k-1 match, he had no sprawl or takedown defense and tried to fight Yokoi on the ground even though Yokoi was a superb shootfighter. If Venetian had worked on his defense and sprawl and worn down yokoi with kicks he may have won through better tactics. Would venetian adding 10 pounds of muscle or adding 20% to his clean and jerk max have helped him? no.

2 fighetrs i really admire are Fedor emelianko and Quinton Jackson, neither use weights in the bodybuilding sense but simply work on grappling and boxing and conditioning i.e running and circuits.


#3

I think improving your strength will improve your performancev in fighting, of course if your skill sucks, increasing your clean and jerk wont help, but if you have superior strength in your weight class you will feel it make diference when you enter the ring, so i wouldnt wait to reach a high level to start strength training.
And Fedor does strength training, he lifts that kettlebells, does pullups, sledgehammer swinging and exercises with bands.


#4

I would cut out the military pressing on dead lift day.

I would want a rest day before my deadlift workout so I can go all out.

I just do 10x10 on deadlift and call it a workout. Unless of course I lose count of my sets then I do one or two more sets.

I would ditch the cardio and do less sparring during the cycle to maximize weight gain.


#5

I dont exactly agree with the previous poster's but I do concur that perhaps you should wait. To use the MAG-10.

Don't you have a weight class to fit into? Why are you trying to gain weight?

Realistically examine your goals and see if this is even necessary.

To improve your strength sure you can use MAG-10, but that might be a bit of a waste. So why not wait till you really decide to change your body (loss fat, add muscle).

For now, work specifically on your skill training. Strength train, 2 maybe 3x a week. Use more challenging motions when you train.

For example if you're going to shoot a double, go ahead and lift your partner. After hundreds of shots that adds up to a considerable strength advantage and your technique improves as well.

I would invest in Martin Rooney's "Training For Warriors" book and CD


#6

DO NOT ditch the sparring just cut down on the intensity. Thats like saying just lift weights don't play basketball (in an effort to get better at basketball). MMA revolves around sparring, you can't practice a kata. Sparring is to standup what rolling is to submission wrestling.

(sifu I recognize you said do less, so I'm not attacking what you said just presenting a point)

Sifu, aren't your reps on Deadlift kind of high??? Im sure that would produce one hell of an effect on the body though. But normally form would be shot to hell unless you're not using that challenging of a weight.

Deadlifts I try to stay below 6 unless I'm doing them specifically as an accessory movement.