T Nation

Best Bodybuilding Read...

Opinions on the most worthwhile book to read regarding bodybuilding and strength.

ill let you know when i write one.

The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding by Arnold

new rules of lifting was a pretty good purchase imo, explains a lot but its not too difficult to follow the logic, there was a book I borrowed from my mate that they advertise on mens health(can’t remember the name) but it was a great read, and the reason why I started squatting and dead lifting.

I actually liked Dr. Carlon Colker’s book.

S

[quote]tg2hbk4488 wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding by Arnold[/quote]

The Education of a Bodybuilder is much better.

Brother Iron Sister Steel by Dave Draper is good too.

There’s one called Gorilla Suit. I forget the author but it’s excellent.

[quote]Brendan Ryan wrote:
tg2hbk4488 wrote:
The Modern Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding by Arnold

The Education of a Bodybuilder is much better.

Brother Iron Sister Steel by Dave Draper is good too.

There’s one called Gorilla Suit. I forget the author but it’s excellent.

[/quote]

Gorilla Suit is by Bob Paris. The best book, imo, is “Muscle: Confessions of an Unlikely Bodybuilder” by Sam Fussel.

jpb

Thanks for all the replies and imput…i’ll take a look at all of these suggestions

I agree with the Mighty Stu.
Colker’s book Extreme Muscle Enhancement was a great read.

I know HIT can be a touchy subject but reading Arthur Jones’s Nautilus Bulletin’s 1 and 2 are great. Free online I might add.

Brian Johnston of the IART has a collection of over 5000 pages which is incredible but more suited for an advanced trainee/trainer.

If you are looking for a very detailed book on Bodybuilding history and the history of its nutrition I cannot recommend,
“Muscle Smoke and Mirrors” any more highly. Randy Roach did a great job on this one.

Michael

appreciated

Edit: damn it i can’t spell!

Oh, if you can find a copy, ‘muscle wars’ by Rick Wayne a pretty cool story of the arnold-esque era of bodybuilding competition.

S

I liked “The Poliquin Principles”, although it was surprisingly thin for the money it cost.

“Beyond Brawn” by Stuart McRobert was excellent.

I have an old book by Bill Pearl which is average in general content but has THE most comprehensive exercise chart imaginable. It makes the one in Arnold’s encyclopedia look like a Denny’s Kids menu in comparison. Admittedly some of the exercises strike me as “exotic for the sake of being exotic” but I learned a lot of exercise variations from it that I still use.

The name escapes me at the moment. I’ll go look for it