T Nation

Berardi Clients

Im redirecting this question to you on another post as not to take away from Dave Tate.

Well Im not questioning your history of training, but rather real people Without a SOLID FOUNDATION making results.

what I mean by real people? Fine tuning an athlete whom has already been training, and has a base of building or sport previously for years prior to working with you I don’t consider a major breakthrough.

I think alott of so called experts ride the waves of an already developed athlete.

WHere few trainers are the ones that brought them to gold or MVP status, or even help to create them on the way, rather than the icing on the cake.

IE, consulting with a starting running back who has lifted for 10 yrs, been playing ball forever and just now gets introduced to some common sports nutrition principles. Thats not what I consider building an athlete from the ground up. OR, WOKRING with a powerlifter whom has never dieted before in his life.

How many of your athletes that are newly aquired have exceeded their previous best efforts?, or how many athletes have you helped to create, NOT MAINTAIN.

I was more gearing toward wanting to see some pics of some real people that have been following the program, or even yourself?, and made some major progress, one where the FOUNDATION is not already LAYED OUT.

just go to his web site

Why would somebody put a lot of effort (i.e. money) into promoting results for an unknown… when you can take a brand name and promote those results instead?

That is one of the most difficulty worded questions I’ve ever read. I still can’t tell what exactly you are looking for, who your audience is, and what you hope to get out of your quest for knowledge. If this is a question for JB himself, you might want to PM him. If it’s for anyone else, you might want to re-word it to make it clearer. Seems like you rambled on/off topic throughout.

I don’t suppose he sees the need to do so, or else he would do so.

However, there are many people on his precision nutrition forums who are quite happy with their results. Like one man who recently competed in a bodybuilding competition and did well… having done nothing but scrawny to brawny and G-Flux and tonnes of PN meals along the way… and some tanner.

So it’s not like he had random success with one person and chose that as the one client he’d talk about.

Why on earth should he feel compelled to prove himself to you?

Like somebody else said, check out his website for god’s sake. Plenty of ‘normal people’ testimonies on there.

He can’t really win either way. If he gives examples of experienced trainers, then people accuse him of ‘riding the wave’ of somebody’s success. If he gives examples of new trainees, then people will just say it was newbie gains.

What exactly is your point here anyway.

I’m not here to speak for or defend anyone, but your question seems funny to me. Perhaps you’d like to ask an NFL coach how his last high school team did?

Results are results man (or woman), and that is all that matters.

Cheers,
Pat

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
Im redirecting this question to you on another post as not to take away from Dave Tate.

Well Im not questioning your history of training, but rather real people Without a SOLID FOUNDATION making results.

what I mean by real people? Fine tuning an athlete whom has already been training, and has a base of building or sport previously for years prior to working with you I don’t consider a major breakthrough.

I think alott of so called experts ride the waves of an already developed athlete.

WHere few trainers are the ones that brought them to gold or MVP status, or even help to create them on the way, rather than the icing on the cake.

IE, consulting with a starting running back who has lifted for 10 yrs, been playing ball forever and just now gets introduced to some common sports nutrition principles. Thats not what I consider building an athlete from the ground up. OR, WOKRING with a powerlifter whom has never dieted before in his life.

How many of your athletes that are newly aquired have exceeded their previous best efforts?, or how many athletes have you helped to create, NOT MAINTAIN.

I was more gearing toward wanting to see some pics of some real people that have been following the program, or even yourself?, and made some major progress, one where the FOUNDATION is not already LAYED OUT.

[/quote]

i went to a seminar, so that makes me a client. i have since pretty much wholesale ripped off his system (heck i just tell clients to read his articles - he has a waiting list anyway so the risk of losing clients is low!) and used it to great success personally and with clients.

what separates those who are successful from those who are not, is some are willing to do what it takes. not everyone has great genetics, most earn it the hard way. you might even consider it cheating to use Berardi’s system since it is the easiest way.

whatever excuse you need to make to yourself not to try because that’s what it sounds like. if it seems to confusing and you don’t know where to start, just say so. also, you don’t necessarily have to follow everything the same, everyone has to find their own feeding pattern. with that in mind, good luck on your quest.

Ok besides the banter here, what I was getting at:

I wanted to see someones progress besides Dave Tate, Or pictures of Athletes.

I just don’t see Dave Tate as a natural Lifter, therefore Dieting down rules can change quite a bit.

Being redirected to the website leaves some worded responses from clientel, or some pictures of some athletes, but not 12 week progress (Dave Tate type thing).

(thats one point)

Second Point is, How many of your athletes have made greater progress while working with you. For an athlete that usually means something like MVP, Leading the LEague in their position, or sometype of MEDAL.

[quote]Leafblighter wrote:
Why on earth should he feel compelled to prove himself to you?

Like somebody else said, check out his website for god’s sake. Plenty of ‘normal people’ testimonies on there.

He can’t really win either way. If he gives examples of experienced trainers, then people accuse him of ‘riding the wave’ of somebody’s success. If he gives examples of new trainees, then people will just say it was newbie gains.

What exactly is your point here anyway. [/quote]

I don’t feel your comments as necessarily true.

Although I have met trainers who worked with athletes from a young age, thats not what I was getting at.

Look at Poliquin, you can darn sure say X amounts of athletes have seen him, and made progress in their given sport above and beyond where they were before meeting him.

Plus you can ad all the MEdals he helped to win. With a hand directly in their.

But the testemonials I see on Berardi’s site are basic, team training, fitness lifters who look like they have been on stage before, Or athletes that haven’t made that superb next level( since meeting with a certain trainer) that some of Poliquin’s athletes have.

I guess what Im part getting at is despite education PHD status doesn’t necessarily mean ICONIC deserved status.

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
I guess what Im part getting at is despite education PHD status doesn’t necessarily mean ICONIC deserved status.
[/quote]

Are you having trouble getting clients or something?

The PhD probably means he has a good chance of knowing more about the subject than most people. However, it doesn’t mean he can take any bum and turn them into a world class athlete.

WTF?

WTF is right.

[quote]vroom wrote:
Kill’Em All wrote:
I guess what Im part getting at is despite education PHD status doesn’t necessarily mean ICONIC deserved status.

Are you having trouble getting clients or something?

The PhD probably means he has a good chance of knowing more about the subject than most people. However, it doesn’t mean he can take any bum and turn them into a world class athlete.

WTF?[/quote]

well said.

perhaps Poliquin is a better self promoter. either way, he thought enough of John to let him do the nutrition part of the seminar they had together in chicago a few months back.

that if anything says volumes more about ICONIC status and it being deserved than having a PhD.

OP

Wait a few posts and Calilaw will come on put up his opinions. Then you’ll be able to find someone that thinks like you.

Have you read his G-flux article? There’s also an transformation article, take a look.
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=909183

I’m really not sure what the point of your post is. Many S&C coaches and nutritionists do not give out client lists.

I’m also not really sure what is so “suspect” about JB’s recommendations to make you doubt them.

[quote]keaster wrote:
Wait a few posts and Calilaw will come on put up his opinions. Then you’ll be able to find someone that thinks like you.[/quote]

LOL. Berardi’s nutritional methods are sound and are one way to lose weight. Have I ever said otherwise? Please cite an example to support your position.

Just because I’m not a fanboy doesn’t mean I’m a hater. Some of Berardi’s stuff is excellent; some of trite and obvious. Of course, that would describe just about anyone’s advice/writing.

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
Im redirecting this question to you on another post as not to take away from Dave Tate.[/quote]

I’m actually surprised this post made it through the mods. Anyhow, why don’t you do this: Follow Berardi’s nutritional advice to the letter for 6 weeks. Find out if it works for you. If it doesn’t, let us know. If it does, well, then you have your answer.

[quote]vroom wrote:
Kill’Em All wrote:
I guess what Im part getting at is despite education PHD status doesn’t necessarily mean ICONIC deserved status.

Are you having trouble getting clients or something?

The PhD probably means he has a good chance of knowing more about the subject than most people. However, it doesn’t mean he can take any bum and turn them into a world class athlete.

WTF?[/quote]

Ph.D doesn’t equate iconic status, but I can tell you for being at one of his seminar that the guy knows his stuff through and through, is a fantastic communicator and all-round good guy. No down times and painful lectures, no super-geeky big words and theory, yet he didn’t dumb down any of his G-Flux explanation, with everyone from musclehead to college-taught understanding and appreciating it.

Besides, go back to the archive, he has some good articles and material there that dates back way before his PhD, so I guess a masters’ degree was good enough for him to start having a business and helping clients. The fact is that no amount of degree or experience will replace passion and drive.

[quote]vroom wrote:
Kill’Em All wrote:
I guess what Im part getting at is despite education PHD status doesn’t necessarily mean ICONIC deserved status.

Are you having trouble getting clients or something?

The PhD probably means he has a good chance of knowing more about the subject than most people. However, it doesn’t mean he can take any bum and turn them into a world class athlete.

WTF?[/quote]

Exactly–and who has made him ICONIC? He is a source of information and obviously a well educated one. I like a lot of his stuff, but also thought his macro meals–P&F notC&F–were a bit goofy.

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
Kill’Em All wrote:
Im redirecting this question to you on another post as not to take away from Dave Tate.

I’m actually surprised this post made it through the mods. Anyhow, why don’t you do this: Follow Berardi’s nutritional advice to the letter for 6 weeks. Find out if it works for you. If it doesn’t, let us know. If it does, well, then you have your answer.[/quote]

FYI i have followed Berardi’s advice at many different points, and can say I think their are much better methods.

I find that total carbs in the diet directly impact how your body will use its fats, thus a high p and f and a carb despite them being separated meals backfires for some unless your 10 % or under BF. I also find that having your body adapt to different diets gives some other progress that is intangible, for instance, typical 40 40 20 split, for a month followed by a lower carb approach, followed by a balanced , is another tool to use in training ( catching the body off guard).

I think the same eating style followed for long periods of time can often slow down results.