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Benefits of High Fat Diets?

[quote]XanderBuilt wrote:

[quote]maverick88 wrote:
I have been eating a 60-70% fat diet for about 3 months no carb-ups and though I felt like crap for about the first 2 weeks I now feel great. I lift weights 4-5x a week sprint 2x a week and trail run 10 miles every Sunday.
[/quote]

Do you carb-up nowadays?

Back in 2010 and earlier this year I tried Paleo for the week and a carb meal on a weekend. Usually sticking to simple carbs (rice, potatoes) and a good quality ice cream (a a few scoops in a bowl say).

Thanks for the tip on the software. I’ve used My Fitness Pal also (on iOS but might be available on other platforms also). Shelby also recommended Nutrition Data (web site) when I was coached by him.[/quote]

No, carb ups at all and do not plan on having them. I am trying to see what kind of long term results/benefits I get. So far so great. Diets like the “Anabolic Diet” though high fat have huge carb ups that I feel may take away from realizing the full potential benefits.

I have not been able to find studies on long term high fat diets so, I figured I would try it myself. As some one who trains I have not had any negative effects in regard to endurance/strength as many believe will occur. It took about a month but, I can now run long distance (max was 15 miles 6:45-7:30 miles) no issues.

whole eggs, cashew butter, butter/bacon fat, fish oil, 2 TBSP coconut oil daily, 1 c nuts daily, bacon, heavy cream, EVOO 2 TBSP, 85/15 beef

very high carb once per week to enjoy junk

[quote]qeynos wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
exposure to carbs does not make you insulin resistant[/quote]

explain why so many american have diabetes if its not HFCS and carbs
[/quote]

exposure does not equal excess :wink:

also don’t forget trans-fats, excess omega-6s possibly, lack of physical activity as well

[quote]XanderBuilt wrote:

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]XanderBuilt wrote:
How are you guys getting such high calories from fat? Oils? In your meals or as a supplement?
Are you also counting the fats that protein meats are prepared from?

TQ[/quote]

Fatty cuts of meat, coconut oil, avocados, coconut milk, salmon, and certain nuts. I count all fat using fit-day. Most days I am at 65% fat, 25% pro, 10% carbs. I eat mostly green veggies and don’t count fiber. I usually stay under 30g carbs. As I said after being on this diet for quit some time I am finding that I do not need as many calories to keep muscle/grow.

[/quote]

Thanks! I forgot about salmon and avacado. I’ve eaten smoked salmon wrapped around sticks of cream cheese or regular cheese. [/quote]

Also, protein shakes with eggs and half&half. The cream in the h&h provides a lot of fat. And some from the yolks.

[quote]XanderBuilt wrote:
How are you guys getting such high calories from fat? Oils? In your meals or as a supplement?
Are you also counting the fats that protein meats are prepared from?

TQ[/quote]

Most meat has fat in it. I seek out the fattier cuts of meat and cook it in such a way that I do not lose any of it. Eating chicken require eating the skin otherwise it’s too lean.

I pour olive oil or melted butter on all my vegetables, drink heavy whipping cream, and eat coconut oil by the tablespoonful. I can get up to 300 grams pretty easily in one day.

I avoid seed oils and supplement with a little fish oil.

Check this out:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]XanderBuilt wrote:
How are you guys getting such high calories from fat? Oils? In your meals or as a supplement?
Are you also counting the fats that protein meats are prepared from?

TQ[/quote]

Most meat has fat in it. I seek out the fattier cuts of meat and cook it in such a way that I do not lose any of it. Eating chicken require eating the skin otherwise it’s too lean.

I pour olive oil or melted butter on all my vegetables, drink heavy whipping cream, and eat coconut oil by the tablespoonful. I can get up to 300 grams pretty easily in one day.

I avoid seed oils and supplement with a little fish oil.
[/quote]

This is almost me to a T.

Interesting video LIFTIC, watched the whole thing. To be honest, I know this type of diet works for me in terms of overall well-being/how I feel (especially sleep), as well as body composition. The only conflict is when doing pretty crazy lifting, in terms of volume & intensity techniques. Like now I’m doing a John Meadows program and it’s absolutely ridiculous… I don’t know how much I’d progress if I was doing this low carbs (even in a ‘fat-adapted’ state, per the video).

Not to mention that, but I absolutely love Anaconda peri-workout, which is basically taking 45-65g (2-3 scoops) carbs per day. I’d figure that would keep me out of the nutritional ketosis that Dr. Phinney talks about.

For those following this type of diet.

-Do you adjust ratios depending on your daily caloric intake or do you have your ratios and let the macros fall where they will?

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
For those following this type of diet.

-Do you adjust ratios depending on your daily caloric intake or do you have your ratios and let the macros fall where they will?
[/quote]

Your question confuses me but I will try.

I don’t really pay attention. The goal for me is to eat lots of food, with most of that being food from animals and plants, nuts, some fruit. This tends to take care of things by itself.

My eating style tends to limit wheat and grains.

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
For those following this type of diet.

-Do you adjust ratios depending on your daily caloric intake or do you have your ratios and let the macros fall where they will?
[/quote]
The beauty of this way of eating is that you don’t have to account for anything. When eating only protein and fat (and veggies or small amount of fruit like berries/apples), you basically eat until satiated. It’s kind of a naturally regulated way of eating, as stated in the video.

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
For those following this type of diet.

-Do you adjust ratios depending on your daily caloric intake or do you have your ratios and let the macros fall where they will?
[/quote]

I think I understand. Many will say and it is true that with a high fat diet you do not really count calories. With that said I do change ratios. On high calorie days like when I have my long trail runs my fat and protein intake is higher. If I left my carbs at 10-15% I would be eating hundreds of carbs. So, on these days my fat intake may be 75-85% depending on protein. I stay around 50-60g of carbs (usually lower) on all days and adjust P&F ratios to meet that.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]qeynos wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
exposure to carbs does not make you insulin resistant[/quote]

explain why so many american have diabetes if its not HFCS and carbs
[/quote]

exposure does not equal excess :wink:

also don’t forget trans-fats, excess omega-6s possibly, lack of physical activity as well[/quote]

Excess carbs -> insulin -> fat gain -> excess bodyfat produces excess inflammatory chemicals -> being bathed in inflammation 24/7/365 year after year causes IR. This is why it takes most people a decade or two to develop it.

[quote]Jeffrey of Troy wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]qeynos wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
exposure to carbs does not make you insulin resistant[/quote]

explain why so many american have diabetes if its not HFCS and carbs
[/quote]

exposure does not equal excess :wink:

also don’t forget trans-fats, excess omega-6s possibly, lack of physical activity as well[/quote]

Excess carbs -> insulin -> fat gain -> excess bodyfat produces excess inflammatory chemicals -> being bathed in inflammation 24/7/365 year after year causes IR. This is why it takes most people a decade or two to develop it.

[/quote]

Ok, not sure if you are disagreeing with me or not.

I just didn’t agree with the previous statement “exposure to carbs leads to diabetes”, this is false

[quote]maverick88 wrote:
Are there any studies that show the benefits of following high fat diets. I am talking about no carb-ups at all macro split of 60-75% fat. I have read the “Josh Whiton Protocol” where he list some advantages but, he posts no research.

I have wondered whether performance athletes would better perform on high fat diets. There have been many threads stating that if it were they would be doing it, others have shared that they tried but, energy levels would diminish. However, every time the diet used is some type of carb-cycling, keto, or AD where high fat is used but, so are large carb ups. When they are just high fat they last about 4-6 weeks. Are there any studies on long duration high fat diets?

I have been eating a 60-70% fat diet for about 3 months no carb-ups and though I felt like crap for about the first 2 weeks I now feel great. I lift weights 4-5x a week sprint 2x a week and trail run 10 miles every Sunday.

Some benefits I have had are:

  • I am never bloated/full/gassy and I am never hungry or have cravings
  • I always have energy
  • No trouble falling to sleep
  • Better/More mental clarity, maybe I am just more alert.
  • Muscle has been easier to hold on to.

Obviously, the benefits are enough for me to continue but, I was wondering if there has been any research done.[/quote]

Not to answer your ? - lolz - but on a related note…

The problem w/ the HCLF diet is twofold:

  1. it is high carb
  2. it is low fat

The hypothalamus reads the total fat intake, and if it remains too low for too long, the brain shuts down the activity of the fat-burning enzyme.

The brain also needs fat, not just omega 3 but alos naturally sat fat, to function properly.

However, 60% + seems to me more than necessary. OTOH, if you like it, bully for you.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]Jeffrey of Troy wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]qeynos wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
exposure to carbs does not make you insulin resistant[/quote]

explain why so many american have diabetes if its not HFCS and carbs
[/quote]

exposure does not equal excess :wink:

also don’t forget trans-fats, excess omega-6s possibly, lack of physical activity as well[/quote]

Excess carbs -> insulin -> fat gain -> excess bodyfat produces excess inflammatory chemicals -> being bathed in inflammation 24/7/365 year after year causes IR. This is why it takes most people a decade or two to develop it.

[/quote]

Ok, not sure if you are disagreeing with me or not.

I just didn’t agree with the previous statement “exposure to carbs leads to diabetes”, this is false[/quote]

except those pubmed articles say otherwise

[quote]qeynos wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]Jeffrey of Troy wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]qeynos wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
exposure to carbs does not make you insulin resistant[/quote]

explain why so many american have diabetes if its not HFCS and carbs
[/quote]

exposure does not equal excess :wink:

also don’t forget trans-fats, excess omega-6s possibly, lack of physical activity as well[/quote]

Excess carbs -> insulin -> fat gain -> excess bodyfat produces excess inflammatory chemicals -> being bathed in inflammation 24/7/365 year after year causes IR. This is why it takes most people a decade or two to develop it.

[/quote]

Ok, not sure if you are disagreeing with me or not.

I just didn’t agree with the previous statement “exposure to carbs leads to diabetes”, this is false[/quote]

except those pubmed articles say otherwise


[/quote]

Man, that’s a slippery slope argument. It’s common sense that sugar is not good for you. Also, this is not what JF is saying at all. There is a big different between table sugar and potatoes.

there’s a big fucking difference between exposure and excess. Fuck people.

15-mins of sun bathing is exposure and good, 15 hrs is excess and bad.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
there’s a big fucking difference between exposure and excess. Fuck people.

15-mins of sun bathing is exposure and good, 15 hrs is excess and bad.[/quote]
from a John Meadows article:

Limit overall carb intake. Excessively high carb diets decrease insulin sensitivity. The relationship between insulin levels and insulin sensitivity is nonlinear, meaning that high carb intake, even within normal ranges of insulin release, can cause a large decrease in insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin levels cause the metabolism to get “stuck” in carbohydrate-burning mode by activating the expression of genes for carb metabolism and down-regulating the expression of genes for fat-oxidation.

The average person has around 350-400 grams of glycogen reserves in muscle tissue, and another 100 grams or so in the liver. If the extra carbs are not burned for immediate energy, they’re converted to triglyceride and stored as bodyfat.

Don’t misinterpret this as a “carbs are bad message.” Again, excess carbs are the culprit.

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
For those following this type of diet.

-Do you adjust ratios depending on your daily caloric intake or do you have your ratios and let the macros fall where they will?
[/quote]

I think I understand. Many will say and it is true that with a high fat diet you do not really count calories. With that said I do change ratios. On high calorie days like when I have my long trail runs my fat and protein intake is higher. If I left my carbs at 10-15% I would be eating hundreds of carbs. So, on these days my fat intake may be 75-85% depending on protein. I stay around 50-60g of carbs (usually lower) on all days and adjust P&F ratios to meet that.[/quote]

Thanks, that is what I was wondering.

[quote]PB Andy wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
there’s a big fucking difference between exposure and excess. Fuck people.

15-mins of sun bathing is exposure and good, 15 hrs is excess and bad.[/quote]
from a John Meadows article:

Limit overall carb intake. Excessively high carb diets decrease insulin sensitivity. The relationship between insulin levels and insulin sensitivity is nonlinear, meaning that high carb intake, even within normal ranges of insulin release, can cause a large decrease in insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin levels cause the metabolism to get “stuck” in carbohydrate-burning mode by activating the expression of genes for carb metabolism and down-regulating the expression of genes for fat-oxidation.

The average person has around 350-400 grams of glycogen reserves in muscle tissue, and another 100 grams or so in the liver. If the extra carbs are not burned for immediate energy, they’re converted to triglyceride and stored as bodyfat.

Don’t misinterpret this as a “carbs are bad message.” Again, excess carbs are the culprit.[/quote]

Don’t get me wrong. Excess carbs are the root of numerous health issues, not just T2 diabetes. And the avg American would do themselves a huge favor to cut that shit down.