T Nation

Benching Flat Foot vs Toes


#1

Wondering if anyone else notice a difference benching on their toes instead of flat foot to relieve shoulder pain. I recently switched back to on my toes and feel I can get more arch which helps get my shoulders in a better position to press. Would like to hear some opinions on this. I think ipf is the only feed that doesn’t allow benching on your toes, but I hate that fed and could care less about them


#2

In all seriousness though, I find flat works better. I think it’s because it forces me to arch my upper back harder rather than letting me arch my lower back.


#3

Yes.


#4

I notice zero difference. I also suck at bench. Why even mention the rule in the IPF if you don’t like the federation?

I haven’t been active on this forum in a while. It’s amazing there is so much directed hate towards the IPF when the reality is that all federations are fucking terrible in one way or another. Also, the IPF is different than the USAPL. Most people shitting on the IPF have never even been to a meet.


#5

I mention them so no one says they bench flat foot because that’s how they do it in comp. I want to hear about training not a comp. And from what I’ve heard ipf is the worst of all. I also don’t have to compete to know that half my gear doesn’t meet their “list”.


#6

Switched from flat foot to toes about a year ago, I find it alot better. I am able to get better foundation and stay tighter cause I can bring my feet back more. Also get better leg drive for whatever reason.


#7

I feel like I lose leg drive and some stability but it gets me more arch and seems to really help with my shoulder pain. Then I thought back and I’ve never had shoulder pain until I switched to flat foot then it would come and go. Only been mostly flat footing for about 2-3 years of 9 ish years been training


#8

Exactly my experience so far, less leg drive, but a better arch. For me toes is a (small) net gain.


#9

I think it also considers proportions and height a bit concerning flat or toes.

Even with weights under my feet, I practically have to spread eagle around the bench to get my legs situated on either side if I bench flat.

With toes, I can drive fairly well, and keep my legs in more on the sides of the bench which lets my butt get tighter.

When benching with flat feet I noticed I can’t tighten my lats as much as I can, compared to toes.

But that’s just me. I’m also very very short.


#10

I use my Squat shoes which are heeled.

I have joked in here on this topic that if stillettos or platforms are legal and it helps then you should use them.

I have tried toes like once but didnt like it.


#11

Remember though I was mainly asking for relieving shoulder pain. So far my shoulder feels way better. I may be switching for good.


#12

Not really in a spot to give benching advice, but CT talks a lot about benching with a very slight decline (a plate under the foot of the bench) for shoulder health. I tried it and it helped my shoulder impingement a great deal. It’s close enough to regular bench that you could maybe do most of your bench training with the slight decline, and transition to true flat for meet prep? Or if you just like benching on your toes more than flat footed, it helps your shoulder and it doesn’t affect your numbers than why not?

I switched from toes to flat a long time ago because it’s “the right way” according to internet experts, but this thread is making me think about revisiting “on the toes” benching. If I miraculously add 20lbs to my bench instantly I’ll be sure to report back lmao


#13

IPF groupies and youtube commentators only. I always benched flat footed because benching on my toes just feels weird, but if anyone prefers that then do so unless you are going to compete under IPF rules. The opinions of people who know nothing about powerlifting mean absolutely zero to me.


#14

I switched originally switched for a comp in Korea and kept it that way. After giving it some time it definitely seems like my shoulders are loving it. On a side note kirill sarychev benches on his toes.