T Nation

Bench Injury - Wrist/Forearm

So the last couple of months, I’ve been adopting more of a powerlifting style to increase my bench. A couple of days ago I got some bad pains on the outside area of my wrist and forearm; it turns out I strained some ligaments or tendons. The doc said that tucking your elbows on bench and doing close-grip work puts a lot of stress on the ulna and the surrounding ligaments/tendons.

So how do powerlifters keep from getting hurt? Is there something I’m missing to stay healthy or does this just happen?

Don’t let your wrist bend all the way back. This keeps the bar in line with your elbow.

I think it just happens, I think alot of powerlifters have the same problem. I have the same problem and it hasnt gone away no matter how long I lay off. My bench sucks but I still have the problem. My forearms hurt when I let go of the bar, so I have to let go real slowly. Wrist wraps help a little.

Two things seem to help me:

  1. Bench only once a week.
  2. Heavy hammer curls.

I’ve had this problem as well, and found 3 things that have cleared it right up:

  1. Keep your forearms completely vertical; If you are dumping at any angle at all you will feel it in your elbows and forearms. I tend to feel it more in my elbows now.

  2. 1m wraps…They seem like overkill the first time you put them on but when the weight gets big you will really appreciate them. I still wear my old 12" for light work but the extra length goes a looooong way to blocking the wrist.

  3. Grip work. Sounds odd, but working my CoC up to reps with the #2 really helped.

I would invest in some wrist wraps.Ive got a short pair of Metal blacks and I love them.You may be bending your wrist back when you go to touch.Sometimes I find myself doing that.

[quote]super saiyan wrote:
So the last couple of months, I’ve been adopting more of a powerlifting style to increase my bench. A couple of days ago I got some bad pains on the outside area of my wrist and forearm; it turns out I strained some ligaments or tendons. The doc said that tucking your elbows on bench and doing close-grip work puts a lot of stress on the ulna and the surrounding ligaments/tendons.

So how do powerlifters keep from getting hurt? Is there something I’m missing to stay healthy or does this just happen? [/quote]

How close is your close grip?

My hands are probably about about 8-10 inches apart.

[quote]jlesk68 wrote:
super saiyan wrote:
So the last couple of months, I’ve been adopting more of a powerlifting style to increase my bench. A couple of days ago I got some bad pains on the outside area of my wrist and forearm; it turns out I strained some ligaments or tendons. The doc said that tucking your elbows on bench and doing close-grip work puts a lot of stress on the ulna and the surrounding ligaments/tendons.

So how do powerlifters keep from getting hurt? Is there something I’m missing to stay healthy or does this just happen?

How close is your close grip?[/quote]

[quote]super saiyan wrote:
My hands are probably about about 8-10 inches apart.

jlesk68 wrote:
super saiyan wrote:
So the last couple of months, I’ve been adopting more of a powerlifting style to increase my bench. A couple of days ago I got some bad pains on the outside area of my wrist and forearm; it turns out I strained some ligaments or tendons. The doc said that tucking your elbows on bench and doing close-grip work puts a lot of stress on the ulna and the surrounding ligaments/tendons.

So how do powerlifters keep from getting hurt? Is there something I’m missing to stay healthy or does this just happen?

How close is your close grip?

[/quote]

go a couple of finger wider and try it out, and keep on trying until wrists feel better.

[quote]super saiyan wrote:
My hands are probably about about 8-10 inches apart.

[/quote]

Unless you shoulders are 8-10" wide, this is way too narrow.

Think about what you are doing, man. There is no way your forearms aren’t at about a 45 degree angle to perpendicular.

Move to a grip at least thumbs length from the smooth and get some wrist wraps.

We use shorties pretty much all the time b/c we take such a beating squatting.

As well as all the good advice above, remember to squeeze the hell out of the bar, like you’re trying to crush it

[quote]ninearms wrote:
As well as all the good advice above, remember to squeeze the hell out of the bar, like you’re trying to crush it[/quote]

This tip should NOT be overlooked. It may just help you. Your situation may not be as complicated as you think. Squeeze the shit out of the bar! Especially when going heavy.

-Kev

From experience, a good elbow tuck does not mean that your elbows are over-tucked. Over-tucking reduces leverages.

A good tuck will have your arm appear (from the side) at a 90 degree angle when the bar hits your belly. Also, you will see a 90 degree angle when looking from the front or back between your upper arm and forearm.

It takes time, do 50 reps with an unloaded bar everyday and concentrate on a proper tuck.

A good trick I’ve learned is to hold your arms at your sides. Where your elbows are draw a line across your body. This is where to hit the bar. Practice that groove, and the proper tuck will come easier.

Good luck, and I hope this helps you with your pain.

Wrist wraps are a must.
Strong grip, hands and forearms will help.
Various wirst flexion exercises will help too